PDA

View Full Version : Another nice piece from Rabid Imam - on Ashraful


khalifa
March 3, 2006, 09:35 AM
Check it out guys, it's on CI - Rab really goes into the backgrounds of players.

http://content-usa.cricinfo.com/bdeshvsl/content/current/story/239411.html

pagol-chagol
March 3, 2006, 10:50 AM
Originally posted by khalifa
Check it out guys, it's on CI - Rab really goes into the backgrounds of players.

http://content-usa.cricinfo.com/bdeshvsl/content/current/story/239411.html

All of Rabid Imam's other articles are better than this.

khalifa
March 3, 2006, 11:34 AM
Originally posted by pagol-chagol
All of Rabid Imam's other articles are better than this.

Could you elaborate? Or are you just mad at Ash for not contributing in the 2nd inning??

I found this article to be unique, from an insider's perspective and not full of stats, which are sometimes meaningless to portray a real-life picture.

pagol-chagol
March 3, 2006, 11:48 AM
Originally posted by khalifa
Originally posted by pagol-chagol
All of Rabid Imam's other articles are better than this.

Could you elaborate? Or are you just mad at Ash for not contributing in the 2nd inning??

I found this article to be unique, from an insider's perspective and not full of stats, which are sometimes meaningless to portray a real-life picture.

This was more like a tabloid article than a cricket article. I don't like to follow how many times Elizabeth Taylor got married and much rather discuss "Who's afraid of Virginia Wolf".

If you don't like stats than check out Rajesh's article on Ashraful

http://content-usa.cricinfo.com/columns/content/story/239379.html

I hope this will change your opinion on stats.

About, insider perspective, this article doesn't penetrate to anywhere beyond a superficial level.

khalifa
March 3, 2006, 12:16 PM
pagol-chagol, I have read the article, and did you not notice Don Bradman was ranked 5th in the table "Lowest % of sub-20 scores (Min 30 Tests)", who is considerd one of the best, if not the best, test batsman? Not needless to say his universally-known batting average of 99+
Now, I am not comparing Don with anyone else, but this goes on to show the inability of stats to the nuances and subtleties of real life!

pagol-chagol
March 3, 2006, 12:20 PM
Originally posted by khalifa
pagol-chagol, I have read the article, and did you not notice Don Bradman was ranked 5th in the table "Lowest % of sub-20 scores (Min 30 Tests)", who is considerd one of the best, if not the best, test batsman? Not needless to say his universally-known batting average of 99+
Now, I am not comparing Don with anyone else, but this goes on to show the inability of stats to the nuances and subtleties of real life!

You misread the table.

Bradman had the 5th best of all time, not 5th worst.

The first table is for the worst ever and the second table is for best ever.

khalifa
March 3, 2006, 02:19 PM
I didn't misread it, I know that Bradman is 5th best in this table. But his overall performance is considered 'the best' among test cricketers. This goes on to show analyzing parts of data can be very misleading. And hence the old cliche - lies, damn lies, and statistics!!

pagol-chagol
March 3, 2006, 02:28 PM
Originally posted by khalifa
I didn't misread it, yes he is the 5th best. That is my point. Shouldn't he be among the first three, considering his overall performance?
Also, these tables reflect records spanning the whole career of these cricketers, when Ash still has a long way to go, don't you think? So this is basically comparing apples with oranges.

Little difference between 5th in the history of cricket and 3rd.

Those 4 guys, although more consist ant than Bradman, didn't have as many double centuries as Bradman. If you look at Bradman's game by game stats you'll see he had many huge huge centuries,doubles and triples. Not just out at 100. On top of that he was the 5th most consist ant (in that scale) which pushed his average to over 99. It seems like your argument is if he was in the top 3 then you have no problem with the stat but since he is 5th you have this disagreement.

There are plenty of players who have played 30 tests like Ashraful , but Ashraful came ahead of all of them(worst). Many of these players are still playing. So, your apples vs oranges analogy doesn't cut.

I wonder if there are a lot of players who have started as inconsist antly as him and changed considerably. That would be a good topic for Rajesh, if he cares.

fishyguy
March 3, 2006, 02:41 PM
This article is basically kissing Ashraful's ***.

Really.

I don't care what he does with his credit card and what he buys for his nephew. Its what he does on the field that matters.

He has a long long way to go, still very immature and this article makes him sound like he's one of the best batsmen dominating world cricket.

Take it down a notch Rabeeb.

I hope articles like this don't inflate Ashraful's head. The players really need to stay grounded.

pagol-chagol
March 3, 2006, 02:57 PM
Originally posted by fishyguy
This article is basically kissing Ashraful's ***.

Really.

I don't care what he does with his credit card and what he buys for his nephew. Its what he does on the field that matters.

He has a long long way to go, still very immature and this article makes him sound like he's one of the best batsmen dominating world cricket.

Take it down a notch Rabeeb.

I hope articles like this don't inflate Ashraful's head. The players really need to stay grounded.

Fishyguy, I was trying to say what you said nicely. You came out swinging.

You are so right. Articles like this messes up Ashraful's head even more.

billah
March 3, 2006, 02:58 PM
Pagol miah, I think articles are not all about stats and analysis. Generally, that is how Profit & Loss (PNL) statements are written. In cricket, the numbers games take a special place. That does not mean we are incapable of enjoying a "personal touch" piece on a cricketer who inspires a whole nation. I've read passionate & personal pieces about English county cricketers by great sportswriters.

Rabeed was not analyzing numbers, I don't think that's his style. He would rather describe the astonishments on the faces of his cohorts in great detail watching Ashraful scoring the 52-ball-96. Obviously, he is a Bangladeshi. This feeling, of patriotic ferver, stands above number-crunching analysis in Rabeed's pieces. That is why we love reading his articles so much.:)

pagol-chagol
March 3, 2006, 03:29 PM
Originally posted by billah
Pagol miah, I think articles are not all about stats and analysis. Generally, that is how Profit & Loss (PNL) statements are written. In cricket, the numbers games take a special place. That does not mean we are incapable of enjoying a "personal touch" piece on a cricketer who inspires a whole nation. I've read passionate & personal pieces about English county cricketers by great sportswriters.

Rabeed was not analyzing numbers, I don't think that's his style. He would rather describe the astonishments on the faces of his cohorts in great detail watching Ashraful scoring the 52-ball-96. Obviously, he is a Bangladeshi. This feeling, of patriotic ferver, stands above number-crunching analysis in Rabeed's pieces. That is why we love reading his articles so much.:)

I said:
All of Rabid Imam's other articles are better than this.

There is a market for all kinds of articles. I wouldn't be surprised if this article is loved by more people than other ones. Public seem to crave emotional melodramatic stuffs.

abherath
March 5, 2006, 11:47 PM
Rabid Imam is a capable writer but I think he uses too much exaggeration and flowery language. About Ashraful giggling, buying a velvet tiger for his nephew, was Rabid there watching him, or is it just the article being spiced up ?

As for Rajesh's article which focuses on Ashraful's string of failures, I think the picture is changing gradually now. As the inning of 136 and the two preceeding half centuries in ODIs showed, Ashraful is definitely maturing. Hopefully his average will be at least in the 40s when he retires, as he has a long time to go, being just 21+ now. Aravinda de Silva of Sri Lanka had a similar pattern, with his average being in the 40s when he retired.

The celebrity status of Ashraful seems to get his head at times. I think this can happen to most youngsters enjoying celebity status.

Anyway, Ashraful is a few years ahead of the rest of cricketing Bangladesh.