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AsifTheManRahman
April 12, 2006, 06:47 AM
So why is this happening over and over again? Inspite of what Bashar's done with his field placing and the rotation of his bowlers (I haven't watched the match and so shall refrain from commenting), we could still have been in greater control at the end of the fourth day, had it not been for the infamous second inning break-down.

It is so clear that our batsmen lack the temperament; test matches are two-inning games and there is no way we can dream of winning unless we get the second-inning batting right.

as an example, look at the way shahriar nafees played. once again, i haven't watched the match, but did get the impression that he was oozing confidence - probably a tad more than is desirable - which led to numerous edges and his early demise. the max that our batsmen can do is bat well on the first inning of a test match; they simply go cuckoo beyond that. they just don't have what it takes to realize that it's a completely new start, and that a fifty or a hundred scored in the previous inning counts no more.

besides, i even doubt they can bat in conditions where the pitch is favouring the bowlers - especially spinners. we won't be provided with batting paradises wherever we go - there are times when our batters will have to be over-cautious, watchful, and settle down and take their time. patience is the key, and i don't think they've developed it to the extent that is required to meet the demands of test cricket.

another 50 runs and we would've been able to win this match; in the end, our batting has let us down (or will let us down).

Sovik
April 12, 2006, 07:16 AM
our players are not fit enough to play in second innings or they thought they have done enough against australia

AsifTheManRahman
April 12, 2006, 07:23 AM
i don't think anyone thinks like that; i don't think they lack in fitness either. it's just that they don't have the temperament.

now i am not sure about our performance in the second test either.

ammark
April 12, 2006, 07:32 AM
Our players are not mentally fit enough for 2nd innings. The lapse started with lee-lichrist pertnership of 1st innings. the fielders were quiet, enam was getting belted, Bashar was just waiting for things to happen. I think this made it worse. If bashar kept trying things, it would keep other fielders in the game then. Then their tiredness and serious lapse of concentration and commitment on the pitch when batting took their toll:

eg. - JO's wild slash at the ball, Bashar's Walk-out, Nafees' slower reaction to Lee yorker.

The only way to improve this is with more domestic 4-day comepetition and Test match experience, and strength and psychological fitness training. Our 2nd innings collapse tendency cannot continue ad infinitum. If the batsmen can start channeling their concentration for 10 overs more each, we'll improve manifold. Only regular application of such an effort can condition them into having the right temperament.

yaseer
April 12, 2006, 07:39 AM
I think its matter of mental aspect....they are not mentally tough enough.

In the 2nd innings, you generally have to carry on the good work that you did in the 1st innings OR you have to try to come back in the match.
In both the cases, as all the teams are better than BD, players are not mentally tough or confident enough that they can carry on with good work or come back in the match against better side....

In the 1st innings, there is no such pressure.....so normally BD plays well in the 1st innings.

AussieFan
April 12, 2006, 07:43 AM
What I feel is when Shahriar and Bashar batted well, Ashraful, Aftab and others should have built on it. only Rajin Saleh tought it fit to do so. 100 more runs in the first innings would not have been impossible or too much to ask for. If that happened, it would have been a completely diferent story by now.

A lesson to learn. Until Bangladesh can handle this second innings thing, they should put their heads down and score as much as possible in the first innings. If you have to, thinks it is an ODI though it would be better if you could occupy the crease too. Then at least you'll have fever losser and more draws.

yaseer
April 12, 2006, 07:43 AM
it is a matter of beleiving on your ability that you can do it.......beleiving that we are also up to the level of other teams....beleiving if others can do it...we can too....

I hope after this great show against aussies......BD players can beleive in themselves that they can compete with any side in test cricket too...as they are doing in ODI cricket.

AussieFan
April 12, 2006, 07:43 AM
What I feel is when Shahriar and Bashar batted well, Ashraful, Aftab and others should have built on it. only Rajin Saleh tought it fit to do so. 100 more runs in the first innings would not have been impossible or too much to ask for. If that happened, it would have been a completely diferent story by now.

A lesson to learn. Until Bangladesh can handle this second innings thing, they should put their heads down and score as much as possible in the first innings. If you have to, thinks it is an ODI though it would be better if you could occupy the crease too. Then at least you'll have fever losser and more draws.

ammark
April 12, 2006, 08:02 AM
If you have to, thinks it is an ODI though it would be better if you could occupy the crease too.

I would opine that this isnt a solution. Right now many of our batsmen play with an ODI attitude. As if its a race against time and overs. They dont think about playing session by session, and ball by ball. The ultimate goal for the team is 5 days away, and spread over 2 innings. Its an insane amount of work and heck of a lot taxing to play that way, instead of hitting out at a ball within a more constricted 50 overs.

Day by day world test cricket evolves to be more aggressive from a point where the game was lauded for how long a batsman could hold out in what is essentially a bowlers game. We're trying to leap to this stage, without conditioning ourselves to the ultimate reality: that the batsmen will play roughly 110 overs out in the sun, and then field for another 110. And then repeat this cycle - all within 5 days.

BioMEMS
April 12, 2006, 08:12 AM
BD players are mentally weak!:mad: You should have seen their faces when Hayden, Ponting were doing well. Nobody was encouraging the BD bowlers. The looked like they all have given up hope. Actually Bashar is the one to blame. He doesn't inspire his team as a captain. If BD had some fighting spirit like the Aussies do then they would have done much better in this test. Anyways, it's not over until it's over and I hope Dav will be able to inject some hope/enthusiasm into the team for tomorrow.

cricket_pagla
April 12, 2006, 08:13 AM
same old story... keep repeatin' n repeatin'...... dis tym.. i ws 2 bored of dis 2nd inns style.. i hav 2 quit watchin 2nd inns of BD matches.....

sadi
April 12, 2006, 08:20 AM
pathetic batting to say the least... speacially the way Pilot got out... it was really embarrassing... the only batsman who had some sorta temperament is Rajin....

SMHasan
April 12, 2006, 11:53 AM
It is a big question why we cant keep the patience. Like everyone I am clueless as well. If I wana find the fault then lot of faults will come out. Our batsman need to think more precisely form now on.

Aftab is having a new disease which is he is getting out just before the end of a session. He got out on the first day and on the 3rd evening. What is wrong with him? He should have just passed that dangerous time and then he could come back next morning but it didnt happen. He needs to learn how to keep his wicket intact. we have to wait and see what happens tomorrow if its a win then its a big big moment but if its a loss then we have wait to see what hapens in the 2nd test. Lets see whether they improve in the 2nd innings in Chittagang.

layperson
April 12, 2006, 12:08 PM
i think this second innings collapse is a psycological barrier for our team..... they perform in the first innings nd get excited nd too eager for runs ..... they behave like kids who just won a race nd in their excitement to win the next one too slips nd fall .... the only thing we can do is try nd make them calm b4 they start the second innings ......thts my two cents on the topic

Beamer
April 12, 2006, 04:04 PM
Listen, even the four day games in the domestic matches don't last four days. We are lacking in that department but it will come with time with more four and five day games. I think its a disservice to our cricket that we don't have another test series until May of next year.

ammark
April 12, 2006, 06:25 PM
Listen, even the four day games in the domestic matches don't last four days. We are lacking in that department but it will come with time with more four and five day games.

Then I suppose we'll have to wait till that day when our players have mastered the art (and mental toughness) of lasting 5 days with full commitment. Our test matches have become so reflective of the lack of domestic competitiveness in this sense. I cant even remember the last time we scored more than 250 in our 2nd test innings!

OZGOD
April 12, 2006, 06:26 PM
BD players are mentally weak!:mad: You should have seen their faces when Hayden, Ponting were doing well. Nobody was encouraging the BD bowlers. The looked like they all have given up hope. Actually Bashar is the one to blame. He doesn't inspire his team as a captain. If BD had some fighting spirit like the Aussies do then they would have done much better in this test. Anyways, it's not over until it's over and I hope Dav will be able to inject some hope/enthusiasm into the team for tomorrow.

It take time to gain mental strength though mate. The Banglas have never been in a position where they were in the drivers' seat over the first couple of days. The first couple of days there was no pressure on them as nobody expected to win, and they played freely, with nothing to lose. On the third day expectations had changed - all of a sudden their nation was thinking, and praying, that they would win. You could see that pressure on them when they played - they played like a team which had something to lose.

The OZ, on the other hand, have played under pressure before, many times. Gilly has done this rescue act many times. The OZ have been in this position before, having to save the match after conceding a big deficit in the 1st innings - the more you play these situations the better you get at them. And the players who failed in the 1st innings (Marto aside) cashed in on their second attempts. And the pressure was pretty immense - the repercussions back in OZ should we lose this match (and we're still a chance of losing it) would have been massive.

It's a funny thing, pressure. It causes some players to rise to the occasion and others to fall. But one thing's for sure - the more and more you play under pressure, the better you get at handling it. The only way you can get better is to keep exposing yourself to it.

OZGOD
April 12, 2006, 06:37 PM
Then I suppose we'll have to wait till that day when our players have mastered the art (and mental toughness) of lasting 5 days with full commitment. Our test matches have become so reflective of the lack of domestic competitiveness in this sense. I cant even remember the last time we scored more than 250 in our 2nd test innings!

This is a good point. I don't know much about Bangladesh's domestic competition, but one of the cornerstones for the sustainability of the OZ success has been our Pura Cup and ING Cup competitions. We don't have the population base that India, England, SA or Pak have, and our athletes tend to get diffused among the many different sports played here in OZ (rugby, cricket, cycling, swimming, etc). So one of the key strengths we have is in identifying promising young cricketers and then putting them through a rigorous grade and then national competition to toughen them up and to improve their skills.

Look at the blokes who have "debuted" in the past year - Hussey (30 yrs), Hodge (31) and Clark (30), just to name three. Practical grandpas, the lot of them. In our team it's very unusual for a bloke below the age of 25 to make it into the team. The only exceptions I can think of in the recent past were Lee, Ponting and Clarke. They have to be really special to be brought into the team. In OZ cricket you're expected to do your apprenticeship in domestic cricket first, then in the ODI squad, then in the Test series.

The idea is that playing in the Pura Cup on a consistent basis before getting into national colours will harden a player enough to be able to handle the rigours of national competition from a mental perspective. Most of the young players we've introduced (including the three I named, as well as Hayden, Martyn, and a few others) have failed and been dropped at some point. They then went back to domestic cricket to work on their deficiencies. This way, they come back stronger, hungrier and more determined to succeed. Some of them (Hayden and Marto) had to wait a long time.

This is also why we've been able to introduce players like Bichel, Kasper, etc - guys who don't have a huge amount of talent but have a lot of experience playing in a tough competition and who are then much more ready to handle the rigour of Test cricket when they do get an opportunity.

The place for a young, immature player to work on deficiencies in his game is not in the national squad. Irrespective of his talent, if he's not ready to play Test cricket then he shouldn't be playing. By the same token, if a bloke is late 20s or even 30s, if he deserves to play then he should be playing.

Though I realise that not every nation has the luxury of a rigorous domestic competition. The WI are in a similar situation - talented athletes but they come into the national team in an unpolished form and are more often than not unable to hack it from a mental perspective. Investing in support infrastructure like a strong domestic competition is an essential part of a long term plan for success.

TheWatcher
April 12, 2006, 06:48 PM
I could live with the fact that our top order batsmen failed because of high pressure of expectance. But they, especially the first three batsmen, got out simply because of lazyness. Both Golla and Abir looked way too relaxed during the second innings, and, I guess, I don't have to say anything about Bashar here.