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View Full Version : "Knowing when to quit" - ignorance Bashar style


betaar
May 21, 2007, 02:14 PM
I am sure all of you BC fans are following the ongoing saga that our beloved captain Habibul Bashar is playing with the mind of BD cricket fans, cricket management, the rest of the players and sadly his own on deciding his oneday cricket retirement. It is obvious that Bashar is not a man of strong will or mental strength, which always showed up in his captaincy. I know he brought the most number of wins for <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-comhttp://www.banglacricket.com/alochona/ /><st1:country-region w:st=<st1:place w:st=" /><st1:country-region w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">Bangladesh</st1:place></st1:country-region> but then again in the land of blind one eyed man is the king. So comparing him with the ex-captains is unfair the least and asking him to continue, in spite of his personal failures, banking on his success as captain defies logic. But what makes Bashar even more dismal lately is the way he’s handling his oneday retirement situation and making any future plan impossible for the management or the future captain.

Bashar’s lack of decisiveness on the retirement issue is as apparent as his batting lately and needless to say his captaincy. Since there have been millions of threads on his poor batting and captaincy on this board, I will save you from the boredom by not talking about it rather what I really want to focus on why Bashar is unsure of his own fate though it is in his own hand. Bashar can take a simple decision and put an end to all the bashing (that he’s got within the last few months) and possibly save his reputation for the future. But what’s making it harder for him to escape all these abuse is the attraction of being in the limelight even if for all the wrong reasons. But the question is, can we really blame him? Let’s find out.

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<FONT face=Verdana>I think the way Bashar is acting is indicative of our national attitude to life and thus a problem for our country. We as a nation, whether in sports or economic development or anything else, is very much success starved and so are the individuals that belong within. Once one of us manages to succeed in life and comes under limelight, it’s very hard to give that up and our cricketers are no different of who most are from families that are either economically and/ or professionally success deprived. When these players gain success by virtue of their hard work and talent and get used to being the focus of the nation, it is virtually impossible for them to give up that lifestyle even when they reach their shelf lives.

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<FONT face=Verdana>Now to justify my point, let’s look at the cricket players of the successful (I mean not just cricket, but other sports, economy, education, etc.) nations who actually know when to quit. If we just look at the recent retirements of all the great players we will see that they all retired at the peak of their career, especially the Australian players. We all know how well Warne and McGrath (I am not going to even bring up Steve Waugh) were playing when they decided to put away their boots. Surely they were top of their games, surely they could’ve carried on at least couple of more years, but they wanted to retire with their heads held high. Not that all the players from the rich nations come from rich families, but they got the right molding when growing up. On the contrary, look at Tendulkar still trying to break records after records and on the process getting criticized by so many ex-great players and the fans of his country that used to worship him as a GOD. The fact that he belongs to the subcontinent (which we are a bi-product of) makes him the victim of the same mentality which tells him to carry on till he is taken out of the shelf. I wouldn’t bring Lara’s retirement in this argument because his retirement has to do more with the abysmal state of WI cricket then his own form or reputation. Though he’s in the same stage of his career as Tendulkar, but Lara actually has still been playing good test cricket and carrying the burden of a declining team.
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<FONT face=Verdana>So Bashar is acting well within the mentality that our nation and/ or subcontinent has injected in him; so asking him acting any different would be no short of a miracle. And talking about miracle, we all know that he is NO Steve Waugh, so hoping for his form to comeback in any form of cricket is a hope against hope.
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<FONT face=Verdana>One other thing that is factoring in Bashar’s decision is that cricket is his passion and his bread and butter, giving up cricket in any form and loosing either of those two is a life changing event which surely has its own downside.
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<FONT face=Verdana>I am not really supporting Bashar to continue this drama or even stay as a captain or as an oneday player any longer then the end of the test series against <st1:country-region w:st="<st1:place" Verdana?><FONT face=Verdana>against <st1:country-region w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">India</st1:place></st1:country-region>, rather trying to analyze why we should be patient in giving him a bit more time to take this life changing decision.<o:p></o:p>

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SS
May 21, 2007, 02:39 PM
You have raised and discussed some points here. Let's see what our members say.

Sohel
May 21, 2007, 02:40 PM
BCB's not a charity, or shouldn't be anymore now that the times have changed... especially for a man of questionable talent and unquestionable mediocrity... others are waiting so that we can all turn that page and move on to a better tomorrow... :D

Tigers_eye
May 21, 2007, 03:01 PM
This is not a trait for subcontinent people or Bangladeshis. In sports this is the norm. Very few know their own value in a declining career. And here are some names to justify my view.

1) Ali (no introduction, conclusion needed)
2) Botham (Yeah, he could change the result of a game by himself when he was in his prime)
3) Karim Abdul Jabbar (Highest scorer in the NBA alltime)
4) Even my hero Michael Jordan came back for no reason.
5) Roger Clemens.
6) Aggasi, Sampras, Lendle not all are like Borg.

I can go on and on. Yes, even Australians a generation earlier didn't know when to retire. Such as, Heally, Taylor, Boon, Dean Jones, Border etc. They all stayed longer than what they should have.

On the other side of the coin: A subcontinent player Imran walked away from the game carrying the trophy. I expect Murali, Vass to call quits exactly when it is time not later.

Sohel
May 21, 2007, 03:13 PM
KRITOGGOTA for occupying space at the right time doesn't win games the last time i checked... :D

betaar
May 21, 2007, 03:19 PM
This is not a trait for subcontinent people or Bangladeshis. In sports this is the norm. Very few know their own value in a declining career. And here are some names to justify my view.

1) Ali (no introduction, conclusion needed)
2) Botham (Yeah, he could change the result of a game by himself when he was in his prime)
3) Karim Abdul Jabbar (Highest scorer in the NBA alltime)
4) Even my hero Michael Jordan came back for no reason.
5) Roger Clemens.
6) Aggasi, Sampras, Lendle not all are like Borg.

I can go on and on. Yes, even Australians a generation earlier didn't know when to retire. Such as, Heally, Taylor, Boon, Dean Jones, Border etc. They all stayed longer than what they should have.

On the other side of the coin: A subcontinent player Imran walked away from the game carrying to trophy.

-I am not saying it exists only in us, but it's more apparent.

-I think Jordan came back under the pressure of his sponsors.

-Considering Imran's family and educational background, he was in a league of his own, how many subcontinent players had the mojo as Imran? So he's more of an exception not an example.

Tigers_eye
May 21, 2007, 03:51 PM
-I am not saying it exists only in us, but it's more apparent.
This has to do with individuals. Not nationwide or regionwide culture. Individuals who have greed would not leave the godi. If you really look into professional sports in US (Football, Basketball, Hockey and Baseball) you will find the majority don't retire. They get cut. We are no better. If we have 95% overstaying then they have 90%.

-I think Jordan came back under the pressure of his sponsors.
No, he makes more money now than what he was making while playing (including sponsors money). He was the Wizard's president and the wizards were a sorry group of players who didn't know how to win or what it takes to win. It is the love of the game and thinking that he still got it brought him back for the 3rd time.

-Considering Imran's family and educational background, he was in a league of his own, how many subcontinent players had the mojo as Imran? So he's more of an exception not an example.
If Imran is an exception so can be McGrath. Waugh didn't retire he was forced to retire because of Border (chief selector protecting his highest test score).

Overstaying has to be an individual thing. Gower, Gatting, Lamb, Atherton all overstayed.

Fazal
May 21, 2007, 04:13 PM
Mamur Barir Abdar.... bat kortey parey Na... tobuuooo doley raktey hobe !!!!!

zahid
May 21, 2007, 04:26 PM
Nice article.

ammark
May 21, 2007, 04:54 PM
I had written this earlier in a separate post:

Bashar's captaincy is overly defensive, reactionary and error prone and has cost us a good number of wins recently with the team that he has under his wings. In all truth I have not seen his captaincy improve or deteriorate since 2004... as has been jibed at often, his on field decisions seem formulaic and unimaginative. It is just our bad luck that finally with the great team that we have now, its Bashar's static on field decisions that have held us back. It would have been quite different if Bashar progressively learnt and adapted his on field captaincy since back then.

As a batsman, the criticism comes from his consistent lack of form, negative body language and the way he's been playing his innings. By all means he may choose not to retire from the team, but he has to prove to the world that he deserves to be in BD team given the alternative players ready and waiting at the moment for his spot. This does NOT mean that he has the right to retain captaincy

Now your questions will only be answered if Bashar truly understands this. His state of mind can be indecisive, but really to me, the reasons for him stepping away from the team captaincy (and/or the team itself) is crystal clear

Sumon77
May 21, 2007, 09:39 PM
You have raised some good points, but still i thought he was a sensible one than the previous ones. but he failed to honor the support of the fans. And its really bothers me when he change his decision not by himself but from someone's (dada) advice. Its time to take strong decision from the sleectors.

gatekeeper
May 21, 2007, 11:35 PM
6) Aggasi, Sampras, Lendle not all are like Borg.


I think Borg tried to make a comeback after a few years of retirement.

kalpurush
May 22, 2007, 12:46 AM
I think Borg tried to make a comeback after a few years of retirement.
Needed some money!....er to kisu kortey parto na..tai...:D

Timtim
May 22, 2007, 01:12 AM
Lets not get sidetracked here ;)

Yah, I admit Bashar has given us a lot. But everyone has to go after their time is over to make room for the younger potentials. That is the final gift to the team from the player.

Bashar needs to realize that his time is over. There are many more than capable replacements in the squad. Even if he stays, he won't be able to play for more than a couple years, so it would be wise to quite while he is ahead (things could get much worse if he stays) while still keeping some dignity. It's only going to make the team stronger, as we practically play with 10 players now.

PoorFan
May 22, 2007, 01:25 AM
Well, I think BCB should plan a system of 'Golden Handshake' system which financially help players to retire from National team. Something like a package of money + job + insurance for a certain period, which may help them to find a new career in the mean time. Otherwise it's getting ugly as well as hurting teams performance, since as we can see from Mahmud ( chacha ) era. I think BCB has enough money to plan and implement those package according to players contribution. This way it will be more helpful and easy for both players and BCB in my opinion.

Sovik
May 22, 2007, 01:30 AM
i just don't know what to say. so frustrating.

CricFanBD
May 22, 2007, 01:34 AM
Bashar should retire from any kind of Cricket even from charity match...it is my personal opinion and I strongly believe that.

And believe it or not...Bashar's retirement will be very good and a highly developed step for BD cricket.

betaar
May 22, 2007, 10:58 AM
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If Imran is an exception so can be McGrath. Waugh didn't retire he was forced to retire because of Border (chief selector protecting his highest test score).


I knew you'd say this. The reason McGrath is not an exception is because there is a trend in Aussie players that established prior to mentioning McGrath's name.

The other Astralian players you mentioned were all mentally strong to make a come back and I don't think Bashar is in the same league. I also know some of the Aussie players retired knowing the inevitable due to process that is practiced by their board which goes to show their tough mindset as a developed cricketing nation and I don't think BCB is capable of doing that as yet.