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Miraz
May 31, 2007, 05:43 AM
I am opening this thread to make members more educated about cricket as a whole. I am not at all an expert, but I will try to give some insight into some basic stuff like field positions, types of bowling, shots, dismissals etc. etc.

I also welcome inputs from other members to make us more educated which will definitely help to enjoy the game in a better way.

Members who are new to the world of cricket can also post questions, and I am quite sure some of the old members will be able to answer them.

Disclaimer : None of the images or informations are created by me, they are all taken from different websites. Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cricket), Cricketscorlive (http://www.cricketscorelive.com/types-of-cricket/) and Cricinfo (http://www.cricinfo.com/db/ABOUT_CRICKET/)

Here comes few basic stuff.

1. Field placements : This image shows the basic fieldingpositions for a right handed batsman.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/9a/Cricket_fielding_positions2.svg/448px-Cricket_fielding_positions2.svg.png

And here's the possible types of dismissals

Ways to get out

Laws 30 to 39 discuss the various ways a batsman may be dismissed. In addition to these 10 methods, a batsman may retire out. That provision is in Law 2.
Law 30: Bowled (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bowled). A batsman is out if his wicket is put down by a ball delivered by the bowler. It is irrelevant whether the ball has touched the bat, glove, or any part of the batsman before going on to put down the wicket, though it may not touch another player or an umpire before doing so.
Law 31: Timed out (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timed_out). An incoming batsman must be ready to face a ball (or be at the crease with his partner ready to face a ball) within 3 minutes of the outgoing batsman being dismissed, otherwise the incoming batsman will be out.
Law 32: Caught (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caught). If a ball hits the bat or the hand holding the bat and is then caught by the opposition within the field of play before the ball bounces, then the batsman is out.
Law 33: Handled the ball (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Handled_the_ball). If a batsman wilfully handles the ball with a hand that is not touching the bat without the consent of the opposition, he is out.
Law 34: Hit the ball twice (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hit_the_ball_twice). If a batsman hits the ball twice other than for the purposes of protecting his wicket or with the consent of the opposition, he is out.
Law 35: Hit wicket (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hit_wicket). If, after the bowler has entered his delivery stride and while the ball is in play, a batsman puts his wicket down by his bat or his person. The striker is also out hit wicket if he puts his wicket down by his bat or his person in setting off for a first run. "Person" includes the clothes and equipment of the batsman.
Law 36: Leg before wicket (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leg_before_wicket). If the ball hits the batsman without first hitting the bat, but would have hit the wicket if the batsman was not there, and the ball does not pitch on the leg side of the wicket the batsman will be out. However, if the ball strikes the batsman outside the line of the off-stump, and the batsman was attempting to play a stroke, he is not out.
Law 37: Obstructing the field (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obstructing_the_field). If a batsman wilfully obstructs the opposition by word or action, he is out.
Law 38: Run out (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Run_out). A batsman is out if at any time while the ball is in play no part of his bat or person is grounded behind the popping crease and his wicket is fairly put down by the opposing side.
Law 39: Stumped (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stump_%28cricket%29). A batsman is out when the wicket-keeper (see Law 40) puts down the wicket, while the batsman is out of his crease and not attempting a run.Here's a bit details about the pitch
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/c/c3/Cricketpitchmswd.png/800px-Cricketpitchmswd.png


I will post some other info, if the members like this tutorial. :)

Miraz
May 31, 2007, 05:44 AM
Here's a pie diagram showing the directions of the cricket shots

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/94/Cricket_shots.svg/545px-Cricket_shots.svg.png

and these shots clarified briefly

<dl><dt>Cut </dt><dd>A cross-batted shot played at a ball wide on the off side (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Off_side), slapping the ball as it passes the batsman so that it is hit in the region square or backward of square on the off side. Also the upper cut, deliberately cutting the ball over the slips, point (or over the gully region), and Chinese cut, accidentally cutting the ball with the inside edge so it escapes to the leg side.
He is near the end of the follow-through, having hit down onto the ball, so that it travels along the ground.


</dd><dt>Drive </dt><dd>A shot played by swinging the bat in a vertical arc through the line of the ball (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Line_and_length), hitting it in front of the batsman. Depending on the direction the ball travels, a drive can be either a cover drive, off drive, or on drive. Also square drive, which is less common and involves opening the "face" of the bat with the bottom hand to guide the ball square on the off side. Drives can be played both off the front and the back foot, but back-foot drives are harder to force through the line of the ball. Sachin Tendulkar of India is well-known for his signature straight drive, which is similar to an on drive but is played straighter down the ground, past the bowler.</dd><dt>Hook </dt><dd>An aggressive, cross-batted shot played at a bouncer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bouncer_%28cricket%29) aimed at or near the batsman's head. The batsman must step inside the line of the ball and swing his bat around his head, hooking the ball around behind square leg, usually in the air and sometimes for six runs (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_%28cricket%29). It is a dangerous shot to attempt, but can be very productive.</dd><dt>Leg glance </dt><dd>A delicate shot played at a ball aimed slightly on the leg side (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leg_side), using the bat to flick the ball as it passes the batsman, deflecting towards the square leg or fine leg area. Involves deflecting the bat-face towards the leg side at the last moment, head and body moving inside the line of the ball. This shot is played 'off the hip' and is sometimes called the hip glance.</dd><dt>Paddle Sweep </dt><dd>A type of sweep shot (see "sweep" below) directed to the fine leg area. The paddle sweep is a cross-batted shot played on one knee, usually at a slow ball on or wide of leg stump. Involves bringing the bat "down on top of the ball" in order to play it away to fine leg.</dd><dt>Pull </dt><dd>A cross-batted shot played to a ball bouncing around waist height by swinging the bat in a horizontal arc in front of the body, pulling it around to the leg side. It is different from a hook shot because it involves swinging the bat down onto the ball so as to keep it along the ground.</dd></dl> Sweep<dl><dt>
</dt><dd>A cross-batted shot played to a low bouncing ball, usually from a slow bowler (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bowler_%28cricket%29), by kneeling on one knee, bringing the head down on the ball as in a forward defensive stroke, and swinging the bat around in a horizontal arc near the pitch (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cricket_pitch), sweeping it around to the leg side.</dd><dt>Reverse Sweep </dt><dd>A cross-batted sweep shot played to a low bouncing ball, by kneeling on one knee and swinging the bat around in a horizontal arc close to the pitch (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cricket_pitch), but reversing the blade of the bat half-way through the swing and sweeping the ball around to the off side from the leg side. The reverse sweep is a potentially valuable shot to play because it effectively defeats the field positions, but it is considered an unorthodox shot by cricket purists. It was first regularly played in the 1970s by the Pakistani (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pakistan) batsman Mushtaq Mohammed (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mushtaq_Mohammed). Two cricketers who are considered to have played the reverse sweep very well (it has been described as their signature shot by some) were Andy Flower (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andy_Flower) of Zimbabwe (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zimbabwe) and Javed Miandad (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Javed_Miandad) of Pakistan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pakistan). The reverse sweep requires good timing and coordination in turning the blade over and also requires considerable arm-power in driving the ball to the off side. It has been known to backfire, for instance in the case of Mike Gatting (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Gatting) of England (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/England) against Allan Border (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allan_Border) of Australia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australia) in the 1987 World Cup, when Gatting, attempting a reverse sweep off a fairly non-aggressive first delivery off Border, edged the ball with the top edge of his reversed bat straight to wicket-keeper Gregory Dyer (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Gregory_Dyer&action=edit). This subsequently proved to be a very expensive wicket for England, whose run rate dropped sharply and caused them to lose the 1987 World Cup Finals. It has also been often used by England Wicket-Keeper Paul Nixon in the 2007 World Cup Finals, to such an extent that it has seemingly become his 'trademark' shot</dd></dl>Source (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cricket)

Miraz
May 31, 2007, 05:49 AM
Here's the type of bowlers operate in cricket.

<table class="wikitable" width="50%"><caption>Bowling abbreviations</caption> <tbody><tr> <td rowspan="8" align="left">Pace bowling</td> <td>RF</td> <td>Right-arm fast</td> </tr> <tr> <td>RFM</td> <td>Right-arm fast medium</td> </tr> <tr> <td>RMF</td> <td>Right-arm medium fast</td> </tr> <tr> <td>RM</td> <td>Right-arm medium</td> </tr> <tr> <td>LF</td> <td>Left-arm fast</td> </tr> <tr> <td>LFM</td> <td>Left-arm fast medium</td> </tr> <tr> <td>LMF</td> <td>Left-arm medium fast</td> </tr> <tr> <td>LM</td> <td>Left-arm medium</td> </tr> <tr> <td rowspan="5" align="left">Spin bowling</td> <td>OB</td> <td>Off break (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Off_spin) (right-arm)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>LB</td> <td>Leg break (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leg_spin) (right-arm)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>LBG</td> <td>Leg break (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leg_spin) googly (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Googly) (right-arm)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>SLA</td> <td>Slow left-arm orthodox (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Left-arm_orthodox_spin)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>SLC</td> <td>Slow left-arm chinaman (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Left-arm_unorthodox_spin)</td></tr></tbody></table>
and the speed of the pace bowlers

<table class="wikitable" width="50%"><caption>Classification of pace bowlers</caption> <tbody><tr> <th>Category</th> <th>mph (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miles_per_hour)</th> <th>km/h (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilometres_per_hour)</th> </tr> <tr> <td>Fast (Express)</td> <td>85 +</td> <td>137</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Fast-Medium</td> <td>80 - 89</td> <td>129 - 145</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Medium-Fast</td> <td>70 - 79</td> <td>113 - 129</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Medium</td> <td>60 - 69</td> <td>97 - 113</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Medium-Slow</td> <td>50 - 59</td> <td>80 - 97</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Slow-Medium</td> <td>40 - 49</td> <td>64 - 80</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Slow</td> <td>below 40</td> <td>below 64</td></tr></tbody></table>
Source (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cricket)

cricket_king
May 31, 2007, 05:50 AM
Nice and detailed miraz bhai. I'm sure this will help some of the newbies to cricket out :)

Antora
May 31, 2007, 05:56 AM
thnxx I actually learnt a few things... thnx again!!!

Miraz
May 31, 2007, 05:58 AM
Here are some information about the Test cricket and possible results.

Test Cricket

Test cricket is played between two teams of eleven players over a period of up to a maximum of five days - although matches are sometimes completed early when one side wins well within the time allotted (e.g. in three or four days). On each day there are usually three two-hour sessions with a forty minute break for "lunch" and a twenty minute break for "tea". The duration of sessions can be altered if there have been weather interruptions or (in certain circumstances) if the state of play so dictates. In the early days (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Test_cricket_%28to_1883%29) of the game, Test matches were played over three or four days and there have also or have been 'Timeless Tests (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeless_Test)', where there was no predetermined length of the match.
Before play starts on the first day, a coin is tossed. The team winning the toss (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_toss) chooses whether to bat first or to bowl first. In the following, the team batting first is termed "team A" and its opponents "team B".
Team A bats until either ten batsmen (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batsman) are dismissed (team A is "all out"), or its captain chooses to stop batting (called a "declaration (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Declaration_and_forfeiture)"). This batting period is called an "innings (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Innings)". There is no limit to the length of an innings provided there remain at least two batsmen who have not been dismissed (when ten are dismissed, the eleventh cannot continue by himself) and the five days have not elapsed.
After team A's first innings the teams swap roles, with team B batting its first innings, and team A bowling and fielding.
If team B is dismissed with a score 200 runs or more behind team A, team A chooses whether to "invite" team B to bat again for its second innings (called "forcing the follow-on (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Follow-on)"), or to bat itself to gain a bigger lead. (If the whole first day of play is abandoned without a single ball being bowled, whether because of rain or otherwise, the follow-on requirement is reduced to 150 runs.)If the follow-on is forced:
Team B bats its second innings.
If team B's total score from both innings is less than team A's first innings score, team A wins the match.
If this is not the case, team A must bat its second innings to attempt to score more than team B's total. If it succeeds in the remaining time, team A wins. If it is dismissed before this occurs, team B wins. (This is very unusual - teams that enforce the follow-on very rarely lose. This has happened only three times in the entire history of Test cricket and each time the losing team has been Australia; the most recent one being the India-Australia series in India in 2001.)
If time runs out before any of the above occurs, the match is called a draw (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tie_%28draw%29).If, after each team's first innings, the follow-on is not forced or cannot be forced:
Team A bats its second innings. If time runs out before the innings is completed, the match is a draw.
If team A's total score for its two innings is less than team B's score from its first innings, team B is the winner. Otherwise, team B must bat a second innings.
If team B's total score over two innings is more than team A's, team B wins the match.
If team B is dismissed before reaching team A's total, team A wins the match.
If neither occurs before the scheduled end of the match, it is a draw.Finally, if the team batting in the fourth innings is dismissed with the combined totals equal, the game is a tie (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tie_%28draw%29) (as distinct from a draw, as described above). With the comparatively high scores in cricket, only two ties (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tied_Test) have occurred over the entire history of over 1,700 Test matches. Both matches are regarded as amongst the most exciting ever played.

Source (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cricket)

Sohel
May 31, 2007, 06:06 AM
this needs to be a PERMANENT feature of the forum. great idea and better job Miraz bhai.

Mr-Cricket
May 31, 2007, 06:22 AM
Great thread mate. I'm reading through it now.

rah
May 31, 2007, 06:27 AM
great thread, readin through it now and the new mebers and people new to the game can hopefully find it easier

Aritro
May 31, 2007, 06:59 AM
Great thread mate. I'm reading through it now.

Yep, this thread was more or less tailor-made for Mr.Cricket

WarWolf
May 31, 2007, 07:04 AM
This should be a sticky thread.

Aritro
May 31, 2007, 07:18 AM
Some greats from an era when we didn't quite have the ability to upset the likes of Australia

Minhajul Abedin Nannu

http://content-aus.cricinfo.com/ci/content/player/55971.html


As a 20-year-old, Minhajul Abedin played in Bangladesh's very first official one-day international, against Pakistan at Moratuwa in 1985-86. Thirteen years later, he bowed out of international cricket in style, when his seven vitally economical overs of offspin helped Bangladesh to their first (and, by mid-2003, only) victory over Test-playing opposition, against Pakistan at Northampton in the 1999 World Cup. In between whiles, Minhajul was a regular member of Bangladesh's middle order - and even captained them for two matches during the Asia Cup in 1990-91. But his record was inauspicious. He managed just two scores above 40 in his first 23 innings, and was only included in the 1999 World Cup squad at the last minute. Belatedly, however, he rose to the occasion, top-scoring against Scotland at Edinburgh (a performance that might have earned him the sobriquet, Abedin Angus ...) and compiling a gritty unbeaten 53 against the mighty Australians. After the tournament he retired on a high, but his correct technique and unflappable temperament kept him in the selectors' minds when Bangladesh were subsequently awarded Test status. In June 2002, at the age of 36, he was invited to join a national training camp, but the prospect of a Test debut has since receded.

Got himself a reputation around the Dhaka scene as someone who peddled himself around to various clubs and claimed advance payments only to sign for a completely different club. Not substantiated though, before we invite a libel case. ;)

Technically astute and as classy a strokemaker as we ever had during that era. One of my old favourites.

Akram Khan (Uncle off Tamim and Nafis Iqbal)

http://content-aus.cricinfo.com/ci/content/player/56221.html

Of you thought Inzamam was out of shape, wait till you see this bloke. As vice-captain during the 1999 World Cup, Akram Khan played Obelix to Aminul Islam's Asterix, twirling a menhir-sized bat for 42 in the controversial win over Pakistan. His technique is hardly worthy of the name - in fact, Akram possesses the widest gate in international cricket - but he's no mug when it comes to straight-lofting the spinners. Very much a specialist slip.
Simon Briggs

Disgraceful review from Cricinfo, demonstrating not only a complete lack of respect but also professionalism.

Having said that, there's nothing in that review that wasn't true. His 'technique' was simultaneously hilarious and exhilirating. Watching him bat for Abahani was a highlight. He only knew one shot against the spinners.

Aminul Islam Bulbul

http://content-aus.cricinfo.com/ci/content/player/56224.html

It is hard to imagine the tiny, china-faced Aminul as a professional footballer, yet that was his sport until a knee injury forced him onto the cricket field. He rose to become Bangladesh's captain for the 1999 World Cup, then lost that post too after the players' strike later that year. For a man of such delicate build, Aminul's footwork can be ponderous, and he has never been a prolific runscorer - not even in his days with United Services in the Hampshire league. Yet in Bangladesh's first Test match against India, Aminul ground out a nine-hour 145, an amazing display of concentration and perseverance, especially given his lack of first-class experience. That one innings has set him up for life. Simon Briggs

Another stalwart of our 90s era. We relied on him heavily and I really wish he'd been a couple of years younger so that our early teething period had been slightly easier. A more than handy batsman.

Enamul Haque Moni

http://content-aus.cricinfo.com/ci/content/player/55878.html

Enamul Hoque was a specialist left-arm spinner and a left-hand lower-order batsman who appeared regularly in Bangladesh's first sorties into Test cricket. A prolific wicket-taker in domestic cricket, he struggled at the higher level as part of a weak Bangladesh attack.

Before a talented Sylheti with a slightly bizzare bowling action and an even more dodgy birth certificate first ripped through England in a tour match in 2004, there was only one Enamul Haque in Bangladeshi cricket and that was Moni. Literally the slowest bowler in cricket history. He'd give it so much flight that sometimes you'd wonder if it had got itself stuck on a cloud. I always enjoyed watching him bowl, it certainly kept things interesting.

Xavier
May 31, 2007, 07:21 AM
Excellent thread, I still have a lot to learn about the game... especially about the bowling style... btw sometimes things got even more complicated: why the square cut/drive shots are opposite to the square leg fielding position? :-p

Aritro
May 31, 2007, 07:24 AM
Excellent thread, I still have a lot to learn about the game... especially about the bowling style... btw sometimes things got even more complicated: why the square cut/drive shots are opposite to the square leg fielding position? :-p

'Square' refers to that part of the field on both sides.

mali007
May 31, 2007, 07:24 AM
Very helpful thread. Will help new cricketers and the members of the forum. Keep it up.

cricket_dorshok
May 31, 2007, 07:28 AM
Nice thread, should be sticky.

Miraz
May 31, 2007, 07:28 AM
I am happy that you liked the thread.

I will post some more details with time.

So, keep visiting this thread. :)

Sohel
May 31, 2007, 07:36 AM
This should be a sticky thread.

hear, hear... :)

Protic
May 31, 2007, 07:46 AM
Yeah :] this should stay permanently.
Nice thread. No wonder one of my favs is Miraz bhai.

Tokai
May 31, 2007, 08:24 AM
Wow! I thought pull and hook were 180 degree of each other! Same on me! Thanks Miraz.

Miraz
May 31, 2007, 08:30 AM
Now, some bowling grips

Fast bowling

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/2/20/Cricket_Grip_fast.png
Normal grip

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/7e/Cricket_Grip_legcutter.png
Leg cutter

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/eb/Cricket_Grip_offcutter.png
off cutter

Spin bowling type


Off spin
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/18/Chinaman_small.gif

Leg spin
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/03/Leg_break_small.gif

Slow left arm orthodox spin
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/3/32/Slow_left_arm_small.gif

Left arm chinaman

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/18/Chinaman_small.gif


Source (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cricket)

Zunaid
May 31, 2007, 08:32 AM
Miraz - can you please attribute the source of the content.

Miraz
May 31, 2007, 08:38 AM
Miraz - can you please attribute the source of the content.

Zunaid bhai, I have a comment in the opening post

Disclaimer : None of the images or informations are created by me, they are all taken from different websites. Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cricket), Cricketscorlive (http://www.cricketscorelive.com/types-of-cricket/) and Cricinfo (http://www.cricinfo.com/db/ABOUT_CRICKET/)

Will this do? or I should add source after every post?

Source link added.

bulbul_fan
May 31, 2007, 08:51 AM
awsom thread miraz bhai..it was very helpfull!! thanks!!

Zunaid
May 31, 2007, 08:53 AM
Zunaid bhai, I have a comment in the opening post



Will this do? or I should add source after every post?

Source link added.

Yes.

Hatebreed
May 31, 2007, 08:53 AM
Thank you for taking this initiative Miraz bhai.

Back in BD there was this 'travelling library/bookstore' at my school. There I bought a book about cricket by a Bangladeshi author, it was one of my favourites because it explained almost everything you need to know about the game. I lost it since arriving in the UK, and it was long ago so I can't remember the name.

Thanks to the internet, all this information is available at our fingertips. I urge all new members and cricket fans alike to read them and learn about this beautiful sport. You may be passionate supporters, but it's also important to know about the game itself.

Miraz
May 31, 2007, 08:59 AM
Yes.

Boss, I asked two questions and one answer!! :)

Both of them can't have the same answer. :D

Anyway, source link added and I will continue adding source link after every post.

akabir77
May 31, 2007, 09:04 AM
wow thats great miraz bhai good job...

Now can you elaborate on when to drop a player and when to chose a new one!!! I think our fans got the biggest problem on player issue. they want to see their fav players or remove the not so fav player from the squad too often. can you find some article that discusses about the effect of too much changes..

Thanks I think you need to make a article kinda think with good format and stick it in the forum. and BC make the newbes read that before they can post anyhting/open a thread. I mean may be answer some questions or something before they can be called street cricketer or something...

Kabir
May 31, 2007, 09:05 AM
This is a great idea. I actually learnt a few of the basics...damn, etodin jantam na? :(

MODS: Please make this a sticky. This is one of the best threads currently.

Zunaid
May 31, 2007, 09:06 AM
This is a great idea. I actually learnt a few of the basics...damn, etodin jantam na? :(


Never visited wiki?

nayef
May 31, 2007, 09:14 AM
enlightening thread!!

Rajowana
May 31, 2007, 09:18 AM
great and very helpful thread thnx

mali007
May 31, 2007, 09:18 AM
Zunaid bhai, I have a comment in the opening post



Will this do? or I should add source after every post?

Source link added.
Really helpful !! Please post some tips on NET RUN RATE.

akabir77
May 31, 2007, 09:21 AM
I have a doubt about this law
Law 34: Hit the ball twice (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hit_the_ball_twice). If a batsman hits the ball twice other than for the purposes of protecting his wicket or with the consent of the opposition, he is out.

I think this is no more a law. can any one double check?

Nafi
May 31, 2007, 09:26 AM
I have a doubt about this law
Law 34: Hit the ball twice (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hit_the_ball_twice). If a batsman hits the ball twice other than for the purposes of protecting his wicket or with the consent of the opposition, he is out.

I think this is no more a law. can any one double check?

I think you're talking about the rectification of the law, which states that if a batsman clearly accidentally hits the ball twice, which can happen frequently, it is not out.

zahid
May 31, 2007, 09:33 AM
I didn't know that Fast-Medim and Medium-Fast are different things! lol

And also didn't know that You are considered OUT if you hit the ball twice or handle the ball!


Btw, Channel 4 used to show DARREN GOUGH'S CRICKET ACADEMY on TV. Vaughn and Murali and many others used to teach how to do things !!!!

Tokai
May 31, 2007, 09:53 AM
<TABLE class=wikitable width="50%"><CAPTION>Classification of pace bowlers</CAPTION><TBODY><TR><TH>Category</TH><TH>mph (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miles_per_hour)</TH><TH>km/h (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilometres_per_hour)</TH></TR><TR><TD>Fast (Express)</TD><TD>85 +</TD><TD>137</TD></TR><TR><TD>Fast-Medium</TD><TD>80 - 89</TD><TD>129 - 145</TD></TR><TR><TD>Medium-Fast</TD><TD>70 - 79</TD><TD>113 - 129</TD></TR><TR><TD>Medium</TD><TD>60 - 69</TD><TD>97 - 113</TD></TR><TR><TD>Medium-Slow</TD><TD>50 - 59</TD><TD>80 - 97</TD></TR><TR><TD>Slow-Medium</TD><TD>40 - 49</TD><TD>64 - 80</TD></TR><TR><TD>Slow</TD><TD>below 40</TD><TD>below 64</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
Source (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cricket)
Unless it has been changed lately, fast (express) is 90+ (144km/h). That would actually make more sense because fast and fast medium overlaps now.

Tigers_eye
May 31, 2007, 10:20 AM
Excellent thread Miraz bhai. May be a seperate forum all together. :)

"Basics of cricket" - Sub Forum name
Arnab's "A reservoir thread of articles on cricket's technical issues" should be there too. Just opens peoples' eyes.

http://www.banglacricket.com/alochona/showthread.php?t=10420

SS
May 31, 2007, 10:23 AM
Great stuff from Miraz. I hope we can also add some video footage of different shots and also bowling actions. Not sure where it is available. I used to remember tv footages of bowlers bowling long time ago, where you can also see how bowlers bowling offcutter or outswinger etc. I will try to see if I can find something (no promise, I will try).

jawaherul
May 31, 2007, 10:27 AM
wonderful thread miraz vai .

however , i have some points .

1) you have mentioned the definition of different types of spin bowls by figure where they are defined by the direction of the ball bowled by the bowler . but , i think the definition should be based on the grip of the bowler and the way of releasing the ball while bowling . otherwise .. say , a leg-spinner's wrong one is by definition a off-spin bowling .

i think the definitions should be such .....

right arm off spin :
----------------------
the bowler bowls with the right hand , while releasing the ball his fingers or palm rotates clockwise that is from thumb to the little finger ; enforcing some side-spin and over-spin on the ball , which makes it change direction after being pitched . however , if the bowlers use the fingers to enforce the spin , he is a finger spinner ( example : saqlain mushtaq ) and if he uses the palm , he is a wrist spinner ( example : muttiah muralidharan ) . usually wrist -spinners get a more firm grip on the ball and can spin the ball to a greater extent .

right arm leg-spin :
----------------------
the bowler holds the bowl in the right hand at the point of delivery and rotates the fingers ( finger spinner ) or palm ( wrist spinner , like shane warne ) in anti-clockwise direction , that is from little finger to thumb .

slow left arm orthodox :
---------------------------
bowler holds the ball in his left hand at the point of release and rotate his fingers ( i think SLA bowlers are all finger spinners , however for the sake of definition , wrist spinner definition can also be given ) in the anti clockwise direction . however , this is like off-spinners since , the rotation is from thumb to the little finger .

example : md rafiq

slow left arm chinaman :
----------------------------
bowler holds the ball in the left hand and rotate like an leg spinner .... in the clockwise direction that is from little finger to thumb . there may also be finger spinners and wrist spinners .

example : brad hogg


Direction of the ball :
------------------------

the direction of the ball is as showed in the figures of miraz vai . but these are normal instances . there are some instances when the bowler bowls like an off-spinners but somehow manages the ball to go like an leg-spinner after pitching . depending on these , there can be some variations ....

normal delivery :
-------------------
when the ball follows the normal direction .


wrong ones :
---------------
the ball follows exactly reverse-direction of the normal deliveries . they are also called googlies ( i am not sure about the spelling )

flippers :
----------
the ball straightens after pitching . it does not chnge direction like the normal deliveries or the wrong ones .

armers :
----------
googlies of the SLA's that goes with the arm . that is the bowler bowls with very few rotations on the ball , rather thorws it with the arm . rafiq has mastered his armers .


----------------------------------------------------------------------------

i am sure , there are at least some slight mistakes in my writing . in fact , i have not consult any site or source , the definitions are given by me . miraz vai please consider , if they are valid , if they are valid , then please include them after necessary corrections , and if they are not , also inform me . thanks in advance .

and thanks again for this very good thread .

jawaherul
May 31, 2007, 10:36 AM
here is my 2nd point . actually a question ... i don't know the answer .

2 ) suppose , a batsman has a stance like chanderpaul in the crease . then although it is highly unlikely and risky ( should never be advised to play like this across the line ) , it is possible for the batsman to play a drive so that the ball goes through the midwicket or even square leg . will it then be call an on-drive or a square drive ?

hehehe , obviously some wierd type of question . never mind .

Zunaid
May 31, 2007, 12:02 PM
Just FYI. BC has some other useful links page. You can get there from the footer.

Here is what is there:

<!-- begin main content --> BanglaCricket: Useful Links

Bangladesh Cricket (http://banglacricket.com/html/footer/links.php#BangladeshCricketSites) | International Cricket (http://banglacricket.com/html/footer/links.php#InternationalCricketSites) | About Cricket (http://banglacricket.com/html/footer/links.php#AboutCricket) | Cricket Statistics (http://banglacricket.com/html/footer/links.php#CricketStatisticsandRankings) | Cricket News (http://banglacricket.com/html/footer/links.php#CricketNewsSites) | Bangladesh (http://banglacricket.com/html/footer/links.php#Bangladesh) | Bangladesh News (http://banglacricket.com/html/footer/links.php#BangladeshNews)

GoldenAsif
May 31, 2007, 12:28 PM
WOW

thanks for the time and effort you put in making this thread Miraz Bhai.

I have checked one or two other cricket forums out (non-BD obviously) and it is threads like this which make BC one of if not the best cricket forum on the net.

layperson
May 31, 2007, 12:38 PM
Good thread for people who dont know the basics of cricket or new people who are interested to learn more about the game. Me, I am a pro, so I can afford to skip reading these. :) Good thread and good job Miraz bhai.

Kabir
May 31, 2007, 12:42 PM
I hope we can also add some video footage of different shots and also bowling actions. Not sure where it is available.

Actually, you'll find tons of that on YouTube, Google Videos, CricInfo, and other places. For example, on YouTube I saw many video tutorials, some from Shane Warne, Wasim Akram, etc.

I like your idea of posting videos. I posted one/two in "Offsite cricket videos..." thread earlier.

Xavier
May 31, 2007, 01:13 PM
I suggest to also include a list of the most famous bangladeshi and international bowlers defining their bowling style.

Zunaid
May 31, 2007, 01:17 PM
Do also check the following BC articles by our very own C'man:


Slow Bowling Terminology (http://www.banglacricket.com/alochona/../html/article.php?item=345) (1st January, 2003)
Calling No Ball (http://www.banglacricket.com/alochona/../html/article.php?item=346) (1st April, 2003)
Reverse Swing (http://www.banglacricket.com/alochona/../html/article.php?item=347) (1st July, 2003)

sislam2
May 31, 2007, 02:01 PM
I was not quite sure about the definition of PULL and HOOK. Even though it is well written, both shots can be played along the ground or over the ground depending the roll of the wrist.

sislam2
May 31, 2007, 02:03 PM
If anyone need cricket tips or tutorial visit the following the site.
Tips are given by the best of Australian

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=cricket+masterclass&search=Search

sislam2
May 31, 2007, 02:08 PM
here is my 2nd point . actually a question ... i don't know the answer .

2 ) suppose , a batsman has a stance like chanderpaul in the crease . then although it is highly unlikely and risky ( should never be advised to play like this across the line ) , it is possible for the batsman to play a drive so that the ball goes through the midwicket or even square leg . will it then be call an on-drive or a square drive ?

hehehe , obviously some wierd type of question . never mind .

Not sure i understood it completely.
Given chanderpauls stance, he shuffles in a position before the bowl is delivered that he can adjust to bowling.

For a square drive the bowl still have to be on the square of the wicket on off side.
so, the ball played to on side with a drive will be a on drive, which case ball may go to midwicket. But if it reaches square leg, it will be a flick.

layperson
May 31, 2007, 02:30 PM
I was not quite sure about the definition of PULL and HOOK. Even though it is well written, both shots can be played along the ground or over the ground depending the roll of the wrist.

Hook shots are played in the air. I dont remember seeing anyone play a hook shot on the ground and it seems to be quite impossible given the height of the ball when you play a hook shot. Hooks are meant to be hit in the air. Pull shots are way different and can be played both aerial and grounded.

sislam2
May 31, 2007, 02:35 PM
Hook shots are played in the air. I dont remember seeing anyone play a hook shot on the ground and it seems to be quite impossible given the height of the ball when you play a hook shot. Hooks are meant to be hit in the air. Pull shots are way different and can be played both aerial and grounded.

The reason it was called hook, because the ball rises to shoulder height. And if the ball is on your body langauge, the batsman mostly giudes the ball on it's way arialy for six, good example Ricky ponting six against harmison in the lords (i Belive). But, when the ball is at shoulder height or over you can still roll you wrists to keep in the ground.

See masterclass batting shown by michael slater. Classic example of PULL and HOOK where he keeps it in ground by rolling his wrist.

layperson
May 31, 2007, 02:41 PM
After reading CM's bit on reverse swing this is what I have to offer on the subject.

Reverse swing: Reverse swing is a product of having a ball with a relatively rougher side because that makes one side of the ball heavier than the other. This in turn produces the reverse swing. The term reverse actually has relevance here because even due to seam positions for out swing an old ball will swing in if the rougher side is pointing towards the batsman. Also the type of action of a bowler helps a great deal in him being able to extract reverse swing. Another difference of reverse swing and traditional swing is traditional swing is off the pitch(because it has all to do with seam positioning) while reverse swing happens in the air(it has everything to do with which way the rougher side is positioned).

Now you novices owe me consultation fees because this is the absolute correct version of reverse swing coming from an expert who was an expotent of the art during his school days.

sislam2
May 31, 2007, 02:46 PM
After reading CM's bit on reverse swing this is what I have to offer on the subject.

Reverse swing: Reverse swing is a product of having a ball with a relatively rougher side because that makes one side of the ball heavier than the other. This in turn produces the reverse swing. The term reverse actually has relevance here because even due to seam positions for out swing an old ball will swing in if the heavier side is pointing towards the batsman. Also the type of action of a bowler helps a great deal in him being able to extract reverse swing. Another difference of reverse swing and traditional swing is traditional swing is off the pitch(because it has all to do with seam positioning) while reverse swing happens in the air(it has everything to do with which way the heavier side is positioned).

Now you novices owe me consultation fees because this is the absolute correct version of reverse swing coming from an expert who was an expotent of the art during his school days.

Normal case, the ball shines away from the new side.
When the ball gets old with too much moisture attacking the old side, the ball moves toward the new side, hence the ball swings opposite way and called reverse swing.

layperson
May 31, 2007, 02:46 PM
The reason it was called hook, because the ball rises to shoulder height. And if the ball is on your body langauge, the batsman mostly giudes the ball on it's way arialy for six, good example Ricky ponting six against harmison in the lords (i Belive). But, when the ball is at shoulder height or over you can still roll you wrists to keep in the ground.

See masterclass batting shown by michael slater. Classic example of PULL and HOOK where he keeps it in ground by rolling his wrist.

Bhaijan can you tell me how it is possible to roll your wrist to a shot off a ball that is over shoulder height ? It would just take away the effectiveness of the shot.

sislam2
May 31, 2007, 02:51 PM
Bhaijan can you tell me how it is possible to roll your wrist to a shot off a ball that is over shoulder height ? It would just take away the effectiveness of the shot.

Like i said watch the Masterclass video by slater where he actually rolls a wrist in the Hook.

Hook is gamble, if you connect you win, but if you don't then you will give our wicket away. Even the best players like richards and richardson fell for the trap. And when the situation allows, most of the batsman like dravid and kallis roll their wrists on Hook shots.

sislam2
May 31, 2007, 05:03 PM
Great stuff from Miraz. I hope we can also add some video footage of different shots and also bowling actions. Not sure where it is available. I used to remember tv footages of bowlers bowling long time ago, where you can also see how bowlers bowling offcutter or outswinger etc. I will try to see if I can find something (no promise, I will try).

I posted a link to youtube for video's.

Nocturnal
May 31, 2007, 05:21 PM
good thread- Miraz bhai. :)

Nafis_BD
May 31, 2007, 07:56 PM
Great thread Miraz bhaiya I am sure this can help alot of newcomers in cricket!!!BBC has this field placement test thing to make you learn all the placements I will try posting that here!!!

Mahir
May 31, 2007, 11:04 PM
Good thread. The main contents might as well be incorporated into a webpage and then add the link on the top menu. Like the Tourism page...

Zunaid
May 31, 2007, 11:05 PM
Good thread. The main contents might as well be incorporated into a webpage and then add the link on the top menu. Like the Tourism page...

That's the plan - check the Suggestion Box thread.

RazabQ
June 1, 2007, 01:22 AM
Also check out the BBC Master classes. I for one found the ones from Shane Warne on spin grip very handy when I was learning to bowl Chinaman's. I can bowl a wickedly turning chinaman - turns on any surface. Now about control and accuracy .... another thing all together :)

WarWolf
June 1, 2007, 04:39 AM
Also check out the BBC Master classes. I for one found the ones from Shane Warne on spin grip very handy when I was learning to bowl Chinaman's. I can bowl a wickedly turning chinaman - turns on any surface. Now about control and accuracy .... another thing all together :)

Looking forward for a new sensational chinaman spinner. Beshi kore practice koren bhai.:)

Rabz
June 1, 2007, 07:17 AM
Very good thread Miraz Bhai.
Excellent work.
Wonder why it took so long for someone to make this thread..
Definately a sticky material.

Miraz
June 1, 2007, 07:28 AM
Some useful info.

If a bowler completes an over without any runs being scored from it, it is termed a maiden.
If a batsman gets out without scoring any runs, he is said to be out for a duck . The origin of this term is unclear, but commonly rumoured to be because the '0' next to his name on the scorecard resembles a duck egg. A batsman out for a duck while facing his first delivery of the innings is out for a golden duck.
The runs scored while two batsmen bat together are called their partnership. There are ten partnerships per completed innings, labelled from first-wicket partnership to tenth-wicket partnership, in order.
A nightwatchman is a batsman who comes in to bat out of order towards the end of a day's play in a multi-day game, in order to 'protect' better batsmen. To elucidate, the batting order in an innings is usually arranged with two specialists openers who begin the innings, then the rest of the batsmen in order of skill, best to worst. The job of the openers is to bat for a while against the new ball. A brand new ball is very hard and bouncy, and fast bowlers can use this to great advantage and can often get batsmen out. So it is harder to bat against a new ball. It is also somewhat difficult to begin batting. A new batsman is more likely to get out than one who has been on the field and scoring runs for a while.
Now, in a multi-day game, it sometimes happens that a team's innings will have only a few men out towards the end of the day's play. If a batsman gets out with about half an hour or less until stumps, the batting captain will sometimes send in a poor batsman next instead of a good one. The idea is that the poor batsman (the nightwatchman) will last 20 minutes and so protect the good batsman from having to make a fresh start that evening and again the next morning. It is essentially a sacrifice ploy. Of course, it can backfire dangerously if the nightwatchman does get out before stumps. The nightwatchman is a tactic which is used about 50% of the time when the appropriate situation arises (which itself occurs perhaps once every 4 or 5 games). It just depends on how the captain feels at the time.
A sightscreen is a large screen positioned on the boundary so that it forms a backdrop behind the bowler, so that the striker can see the ball clearly. Sightscreens are white when a red ball is used, and black for a white ball.
A rabbit is a player (almost invariably a bowler, but sometimes a wicket-keeper) who is a very poor batsman. A ferret is an extremely poor batsman (so called because he ``goes in after the rabbits'').


Source (http://www.cs.purdue.edu/homes/hosking/cricket/explanation.htm)

The last one is new to me. :)

In that case our Khaled Mashud has turned into a Rabbit and heading towards becoming Ferret. :)

jawaherul
June 1, 2007, 09:19 AM
Not sure i understood it completely.
Given chanderpauls stance, he shuffles in a position before the bowl is delivered that he can adjust to bowling.

For a square drive the bowl still have to be on the square of the wicket on off side.
so, the ball played to on side with a drive will be a on drive, which case ball may go to midwicket. But if it reaches square leg, it will be a flick.


thanks for the reply .

but , i was not referring to the flick . actually , the flick is played like this ... the bat lift is towards the 1st slip , then it comes down vertically and just before the point of contact with the ball , the bat faces a very straight mid on . then with the roll of the wrist , the batsman close the face of the bat towards square leg and guides the ball to square leg or fine leg .

however , the shot i was mentioning is not like this . you stand in a open stance like chandarpaul and don't shuffle before playing the ball . rather , your shot look like this . the bat lift is towards gully or point and then the bat comes down vertically like a drive with the bat face pointing to the square leg at the point of contact with the ball . then there is no roll of the wrist and the follow the bat goes with the follow through pointing towards square leg . it is not a flock , it is a drive . the bat starts from the batr lifts towards point or gully and the after vertical swing , ends with the follow through pointing to square leg . it is very difficult to time well with such a cross-bat . but if you time it well and have a reasonably good placement , the ball should go racing past even the square leg fielder if he is a little finer or squarer . on the other hand the flick shot only uses the ball's speed and it rather guides the ball .

sislam2
June 1, 2007, 10:05 AM
thanks for the reply .

but , i was not referring to the flick . actually , the flick is played like this ... the bat lift is towards the 1st slip , then it comes down vertically and just before the point of contact with the ball , the bat faces a very straight mid on . then with the roll of the wrist , the batsman close the face of the bat towards square leg and guides the ball to square leg or fine leg .

however , the shot i was mentioning is not like this . you stand in a open stance like chandarpaul and don't shuffle before playing the ball . rather , your shot look like this . the bat lift is towards gully or point and then the bat comes down vertically like a drive with the bat face pointing to the square leg at the point of contact with the ball . then there is no roll of the wrist and the follow the bat goes with the follow through pointing towards square leg . it is not a flock , it is a drive . the bat starts from the batr lifts towards point or gully and the after vertical swing , ends with the follow through pointing to square leg . it is very difficult to time well with such a cross-bat . but if you time it well and have a reasonably good placement , the ball should go racing past even the square leg fielder if he is a little finer or squarer . on the other hand the flick shot only uses the ball's speed and it rather guides the ball .

NOw i understand what you mean, with his stance, the on drive played towards the square leg instead of regular midwicket. Well, I have seen him and a county batsman play shot like that, in most cases the commentators labeled as flick, but it could be called something if chanderpaul can play it perfectly and get a patent on it. In that case they have to come up with a new name for the shot.

ialbd
June 1, 2007, 10:26 AM
shikhlam, onek kisui shikhlam, thanx for the compilation......

Miraz
June 1, 2007, 10:34 AM
Here's a BBC link to explain LBW decisions (http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/cricket/rules_and_equipment/6125026.stm)

Miraz
June 8, 2007, 08:06 AM
OK, now time to understand Twenty20 Cricket

Some rules in brief

Twenty20 Cricket Rules
Twenty overs per side.
Bowlers are restricted only to 4 overs each. (one fifth of the total overs in case of curtailed match)
Fielding restrictions in the first six overs - 2 fielders should be outside circle with a minimum of two close in fielders.
Fielding restrictions for overs 7-20 - maximum five fielders permitted outside the circle.
A ‘no-ball’ is worth 2 runs as the batsman gets a free run after a no-ball. A batsman will not get out in free hit except run out.
Each side has only about 80 minutes to get through their 20 overs. There is 15 minutes between every innings.
Teams will incur a six-run penalty if they fail to bowl the full 20 overs within the 80 minutes.
The next batsman has 90 second after the fall of a wicket to get to the crease.
Umpires can impose 5 run penalty for time wasting by batsman
Minimum 5 overs each side to constitute a match (in case of inclement weather)

Padosan
June 8, 2007, 08:47 AM
thanks for the reply .

but , i was not referring to the flick . actually , the flick is played like this ... the bat lift is towards the 1st slip , then it comes down vertically and just before the point of contact with the ball , the bat faces a very straight mid on . then with the roll of the wrist , the batsman close the face of the bat towards square leg and guides the ball to square leg or fine leg .

however , the shot i was mentioning is not like this . you stand in a open stance like chandarpaul and don't shuffle before playing the ball . rather , your shot look like this . the bat lift is towards gully or point and then the bat comes down vertically like a drive with the bat face pointing to the square leg at the point of contact with the ball . then there is no roll of the wrist and the follow the bat goes with the follow through pointing towards square leg . it is not a flock , it is a drive . the bat starts from the batr lifts towards point or gully and the after vertical swing , ends with the follow through pointing to square leg . it is very difficult to time well with such a cross-bat . but if you time it well and have a reasonably good placement , the ball should go racing past even the square leg fielder if he is a little finer or squarer . on the other hand the flick shot only uses the ball's speed and it rather guides the ball .

I would call it a on drive, since it is actually is a drive.

And my take on the pull / hook difference,
a pull is normally played between square leg (stumps ) to long on (bowlers stumps)
a hook is normally played behind square(behind the batsmans stumps).

israr
June 8, 2007, 09:50 AM
I know almost all the rules and cricketing terms of test, one-day, and 20-20 since I am an avid cricket follower. But can someone exactly explain to me a half-volley and the popping crease. Eventhough I view the action replays a hundred times, I just don't understand what they are referring to by saying these terms during commentary. Maybe I simply don't concentrate enough.

Miraz
June 8, 2007, 09:57 AM
I know almost all the rules of test, one-day, and 20-20. But can someone exactly explain to me a half-volley and the popping crease. Eventhough I view the action replays a hundred times, I just don't understand what they are referring to by saying these terms during commentary.

Here's popping crease from Wiki

Popping crease

The odd name of the popping crease refers to the early history of the game of cricket (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cricket), in that batsmen used to have to 'pop' their bats into a small hole that was located in the middle of the crease for a run to count. For a player to run a batsman out he had to pop the ball into the hole before the bat was grounded in it.
One popping crease is drawn at each end of the pitch in front of each of the two sets of stumps. The popping crease must be 4 feet (1.22 m) in front of and parallel to the bowling crease. Although it is considered to have unlimited length, the popping crease must be marked to at least 6 feet (1.83 metres) on either side of the imaginary line joining the centres of the middle stumps.
The popping crease is used in one test of whether the bowler has bowled a no ball. To avoid a no ball, some part of the bowler's front foot in the delivery stride (that is, the stride when he releases the ball (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cricket_ball)) must be behind the popping crease (although the bowler's front foot does not have to be grounded).
And half volley delivery means a delivery which is short of block hole, that means about 1/4 meter from the stance of the batsman.

israr
June 8, 2007, 11:59 AM
Thanks a lot for the info!

damalChele
June 8, 2007, 12:34 PM
great thread.
so..if you play the hook shot pretty well then you are called a Hooker?

Padosan
June 8, 2007, 12:35 PM
half volley is to over pitched
as full volley/full toss is to full pitched