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Shafin
June 17, 2007, 04:04 PM
The next Warne
New Age Desk

Shane Warne’s heir apparent Cullen Bailey will be looking to the champion leg-spinner’s mentor Terry Jenner as he bids to win a place in the Australian Test team.
The South Australian leg-spinner was included in Cricket Australia’s 25-man contract squad last month, and is considered the player most likely to step into the enormous shoes of Test cricket’s leading wicket-taker.
Bailey told the Adelaide Advertiser that he sought out Jenner during a one-week camp at the Australian Cricket Academy in Brisbane, and that he was hoping to develop his game ahead of Australia A’s tour of Pakistan in September.
‘The challenge is to become a successful first-class cricketer and go from there,’ he said.
‘Terry Jenner is up there, which is great, while you have Troy Cooley, Jamie Siddons and Tim (Nielsen) to help as well.’
Nielsen, also a South Australian, has taken over from John Buchanan as Australia coach, and Bailey is hoping he can make an impression on him during matches in Queensland next month.
But he said that while he was now a step closer to national selection, he felt no extra pressure.
‘There might be some pressure from outside but I haven’t felt any more personally,’ he said.
Fellow South Australian Daniel Cullen, an off-spinner contracted to CA, has also been at the Academy in Brisbane, and Bailey said he has seen noticeable improvement in Cullen and fellow Redback Mark Cosgrove.
‘They are working very hard up there with Tim,’ said Bailey.
‘Dan said he wasn’t going to pick up a ball for a month but after two days was bowling for 20 overs.
‘He is pretty happy with how things are going. Cosgrove has been doing lots of running and trying to improve all aspects of his game.’

Do any of you know how good he really is?
Mark Cosgrove,isn't he the new Inzy?

source (http://www.newagebd.com/spt.html)

Shafin
June 17, 2007, 04:09 PM
Shane Warne made into a theatrical
New Age Desk

His life has had more twists and sub-plots than many a stage show. If it was not a sex scandal, it is has been a drug ban or his record-breaking achievements on the pitch that have kept Hampshire cricket captain Shane Warne firmly in the public eye.
Now his amazing life has made him a theatrical star with the premiere of Shane Warne: The Musical on Sunday at the Dunstan Playhouse, as part of the Adelaide Cabaret Festival, in South Australia, according to Daily Echo.
The show has been written by comedian and composer Eddie Perfect, noted for his satirical lyrics. He is from Melbourne, Victoria, Warne’s home city.
Eddie, who confesses he is not a cricket or a musical fan, developed the concept with Sydney actor and playwright Toby Schmitz.
Eddie said: ‘I came up with the idea while touring a show in Australia. In each new city, newspaper headlines screamed the latest Warne escapade.
‘As a joke, I mentioned to my manager that Warne’s life would make an epic piece of opera. Being a massive Warne fan, he told me the idea had merit.’
‘It only took a little research to turn me around and realise Warne’s life is epic, that it’s the free-flowing result of a prodigious talent and incredible determination.’
Shane Warne The Musical featured well-known incidents from the controversial cricketer’s career including the Aussie legend’s fondness for sending sexy text messages.
The 90-minute show cost theatre-goers at the 620-seat auditorium the equivalent of about £12 a ticket.
When Eddie began writing the script last year, he didn’t notify Warne of his plans, and it’s

:D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D

source (http://www.newagebd.com/spt.html)

Sohel
June 17, 2007, 04:26 PM
Cullen Bailey or Piyush Chawla ? Maybe both ?

Shafin
June 17, 2007, 04:35 PM
Piyush Chawla certainly has the potential,but i'd give Cullen Bailey the upper hand because his board is much smarter than the Indian one,Look what India did to Pathan,"the next Wasim"

Sohel
June 17, 2007, 04:42 PM
Anyway, exciting times ahead ...

If only WI could find one ...

MohammedC
June 17, 2007, 05:14 PM
Watch out for him Adil Rashid (http://content-uk.cricinfo.com/countycricket2007/content/current/player/244497.html) or should it to be Monty, who will have contest in near future

Electrequiem
June 17, 2007, 05:58 PM
Just from the title of the thread, I thought we were talking about Piyush Chawla.

WarWolf
June 17, 2007, 06:21 PM
May be little of topic, sorry for it. But I am sure we will see a flare of Warne in Ash.

syzygy
June 17, 2007, 06:55 PM
too too early to even think abt next warne and next mcgrath, its not gonna happen before next 10 -15 yrs. piyush is still 18 or 19, so give him a break guys, he is yet to become established even in ind cricket scene but he has immmese potential. i wish dravid can nurture him well but still a loooooong way to go. i dont want to get too excited and then repent.let him prove first that he is good enough to play for india regularly in both odi and test and then we will think abt the next step.Warne ? Its like sitting in earth and dreaming abt jupiter. who is bayliss btw? his avg in first class did nt even sound that good.

One World
June 17, 2007, 07:02 PM
too too early to even think abt next warne and next mcgrath, its not gonna happen before next 10 -15 yrs.

10-15 years, you must be kidding. Just come back in 5 years. :callme:

syzygy
June 17, 2007, 07:35 PM
10-15 years, you must be kidding. Just come back in 5 years. :callme:

no i am not , it must be u who is kidding. warne and mcgrath started playing international cricket in the early 90s and it took them 15-16 yrs to scale the heights they have reached now. even if piyush/bayliss starts today and grows at a faster rate than warne it will take them at least 10 yrs minimun to achieve what warne has done. does that ring any bell in ur ears :callme:

P.Warner
June 17, 2007, 07:42 PM
Adil Rashid is indeed a class act and much is expected of this fine young man from Yorkshire.

One World
June 17, 2007, 07:46 PM
no i am not , it must be u who is kidding. warne and mcgrath started playing international cricket in the early 90s and it took them 15-16 yrs to scale the heights they have reached now. even if piyush/bayliss starts today and grows at a faster rate than warne it will take them at least 10 yrs minimun to achieve what warne has done. does that ring any bell in ur ears :callme:

as i said, i will be back in 5 years since then :wave:


PS: If God keeps me alive :lol:

Shafin
June 18, 2007, 02:45 AM
Watch out for him Adil Rashid (http://content-uk.cricinfo.com/countycricket2007/content/current/player/244497.html) or should it to be Monty, who will have contest in near future
Haha,one thing the Indian subcontinent had taken from England and then returned with value addition is cricket,specially spinners,Monty,Adel,all has roots here,even Naser Hussain was a promising Leggie.

Sovik
June 18, 2007, 10:30 AM
feeling shane warne's shoe is a big task.

rah
June 22, 2007, 11:49 AM
wotch out for adil rashid u lot, he is very promising

ammark
June 22, 2007, 06:27 PM
no i am not , it must be u who is kidding. warne and mcgrath started playing international cricket in the early 90s and it took them 15-16 yrs to scale the heights they have reached now. even if piyush/bayliss starts today and grows at a faster rate than warne it will take them at least 10 yrs minimun to achieve what warne has done. does that ring any bell in ur ears :callme:

Cant agree with you here. Warne and McGrath were established great front line bowlers of their teams by end of 1996 world cup at the latest. If ranking the greatness of a bowler is done by "number of wickets taken" then its only logical that to scale heights it'll take 10-15 years. That takes away everything from Piyush Chawla's skill and gameplay.

OZGOD
June 25, 2007, 01:29 AM
Premature. He's not Warney's left sock at the moment.

One World
June 25, 2007, 03:53 AM
Premature. He's not Warney's left sock at the moment.

Agreed. I dont see much hope in Chawla BTW.

ialbd
June 25, 2007, 03:55 PM
no one just comes out of the academy (or u-19) with the shane warne or mcgrath package. you need 3-4 years to anchor your position in the national side and another 3-4 years to develop your skills to the max, and only then the next warne or mcgrath comes out.....

syzygy
June 25, 2007, 05:57 PM
Agreed. I dont see much hope in Chawla BTW.

well look above! what happened to your hope when u asked me to come back after 5 years :) ? btw what did chawla do wrong in his last match or so that u lost ur hope in him ?

syzygy
June 25, 2007, 06:03 PM
Cant agree with you here. Warne and McGrath were established great front line bowlers of their teams by end of 1996 world cup at the latest. If ranking the greatness of a bowler is done by "number of wickets taken" then its only logical that to scale heights it'll take 10-15 years. That takes away everything from Piyush Chawla's skill and gameplay.

first he has to perform consistently..one or two sparks are not good enough to be selected in a national squad..remember narender hirwani - the great leg spinner who took 16 wickets in his first test match ?? how fast he came and gone. i agree chawla has immense potential and if nurtured well (with no hype!!!) he could be a great prospect in the future.however having said that, let him play well consistently, get picked for the national side on aregular basis, play for another 5 yrs, then we will revisit this thread again. alright?

Sovik
June 25, 2007, 06:17 PM
piush chawla is a bright prospect.

One World
June 25, 2007, 08:54 PM
well look above! what happened to your hope when u asked me to come back after 5 years :) ? btw what did chawla do wrong in his last match or so that u lost ur hope in him ?

:) I did not put my hope on Chawla. Let me ask you would you put your hope on,

Thandi Tshabalala
South Africa
Full name Thandi Tshabalala
Born November 19, 1984, Welkom, Free State
Current age 22 years 219 days
Major teams <NOBR>South Africa,</NOBR> <NOBR>Africa XI,</NOBR> <NOBR>Eagles,</NOBR> <NOBR>Free State</NOBR>
Playing role Bowler
Batting style Right-hand bat
Bowling style Right-arm offbreak

SMHasan
June 25, 2007, 09:35 PM
We gonna have a decent leg spiner very soon. Just wait and be patient.

Rabz
June 26, 2007, 05:44 AM
There can only be ONE Warne.
He is one of a kind.

Shafin
July 1, 2007, 10:24 AM
An article from the wisden Almanac

Waiting for the next great finger-spinner, 1997

Ashley Mallett

The genius of Shane Warne has led to a surge of interest in spin bowling. Warne keeps his method simple - walk-up start, eyes focused, wrist cocked and an enormous surge of power through the crease. Until he came along, many feared wrist-spin was a lost art, gone the way of the dinosaurs, who vanished years ago when Planet Earth failed to duck a cosmic bumper.

Yet, at the same time, finger-spinners have been finding it harder than ever to take wickets. People advance all kinds of reasons for this, like heavy bats. I don't believe this. A heavier bat might mean bigger sixes and harder-hit boundaries, but it also means more mis-hits and edges that carry into fielders' hands. Any off-spinner worth his salt would love to bowl to batsmen like Graeme Hick and Robin Smith - and Mark Taylor and Steve Waugh. But the modern generation of finger-spinners is simply inadequate.

Spin bowling lost favour in the early 1970s. John Snow won the Ashes for England, led by Ray Illingworth, in 1970-71 and pace dominated the epic series of 1972. Illingworth was a masterful captain. He used Snow brilliantly and had Derek Underwood to tie down one end. On a rain-affected wicket, Underwood lived up to his nickname of Deadly. But on a flat wicket, which was more normal in Test cricket, he kept things tight as a drum. And Illingworth's use of him greatly influenced other captains round the world: a barrage of pace with a slowie to keep up an end was the less than subtle trend. A spinner was let loose in attack only on a spinning minefield.

Then, after West Indies were crushed 5-1 by the Australian pacemen in 1975-76, things moved a stage further when Clive Lloyd developed his strategy of using four fast bowlers in a system of constant quality pace, with rest periods built in for the bowlers, but no respite for the batsmen. Applied to the letter, the plan allowed for each bowler to deliver 18 six-ball overs.

Spinners could not be part of such a scheme. Even outside West Indies, Test spinners soon became support staff, useful for keeping things tight while the quicks were rotated at the other end. I have first-hand experience of this. In 23 Tests from 1968 to 1975 I took 100 wickets, yet only 32 in 15 from 1975 to 1980. When they were given the odd chance, spinners suffered by bowling to wicket-keepers picked primarily for their ability to bat: batting line-ups had to be bolstered to withstand the pace barrage. To retain a Test place (outside India) in the mid-1970s, slow men usually had to double as batsmen, or field like Trojans, or both. A mind-set was established. Emerging spinners were urged to keep it tight, a trend increased by the growth of one-day cricket.

Most of the spinners who emerged in this climate were rollers who gave the ball a gentle release rather than a real tweak. They would turn the ball adequately on the soft pitches of England or New Zealand, or the flat plasticine wickets of Sydney grade cricket, but in Adelaide or Perth the ball would go through cannonball straight.

But what that meant was a generation of top batsmen who did not know how to confront great spin when it arrived. It took an unusual piece of cricket to prove the rule. In 1988-89 Allan Border took 11 for 96 at Sydney. It was, admittedly, a poor track, but if a roller like Border, who would never get wickets on a true surface, could do that, it told us that batsmanship against spin had sunk to the depths.

Then came Warne. He bowled the leg-break with over-spin, the flipper and the top-spinner; he did not need to bowl the wrong'un too often. Instead of the googly against the left-hander beating the bat by a fair margin, his top-spinner took the edge. Smart. Above all, he was accurate. During the bleak years for spin, the idea was that finger-spinners were more accurate and could be trusted. Turn to history and you will find that many of the most accurate bowlers of all time were leg-spinners: Grimmett, Wright, O'Reilly, Barnes, Gupte, Benaud, Kumble, Warne.

The wrist-spinner can sometimes get away with a shortish delivery, anyway, because of the work he achieves on the ball, given that he is using a combination of fingers, wrist and arm. The ball bounces high and often tucks the batsman up

The wrist-spinner can sometimes get away with a shortish delivery, anyway, because of the work he achieves on the ball, given that he is using a combination of fingers, wrist and arm. The ball bounces high and often tucks the batsman up. The delivery might cost him one run whereas an orthodox spinner's short one would not usually have steepling bounce and would get the full treatment. And when the ball is wet, The wrist-spinner has a decided advantage. Offies hold the ball very tightly, with fingers widely spaced across the seam; that makes purchase very difficult.

Warne has also re-asserted mastery in the air. During the 1960-61 West Indies v Australia series, Garry Sobers and Norman O'Neill often blocked half-volleys from the spinners, then launched into stinging drives against seemingly identical deliveries. I thought they were merely resting: block one, belt one. But in 1967 I found myself in Clarrie Grimmett's back garden in Adelaide. He was 75, I was 22. After I bowled two balls at him and he middled them both, he called down the pitch: "Son, give up bowling and become a batsman. I could play you blindfolded!" Then he talked good sense about flight.

Grimmett knew how easily a batsman could read the exact spot a flat-trajectory ball would pitch as soon as it left the hand. If he is looking down on the ball, he holds all the aces, like a fighter pilot diving out of the sun on his prey. I realised that O'Neill and Sobers were blocking only the balls that had genuinely beaten them in flight. Such balls are spun hard, dipping acutely from above eye-level.

This is the lesson. A spinner must try to make things happen, not merely bowl accurately and wait for the batsman to make a mistake. In this sense, there is no difference between finger-spin and wrist-spin. Many people believe that one is easy and the other difficult. But the off-break with maximum spin is just as hard to bowl with control as a leg-break - and it takes greater toll on the fingers. Men like Lance Gibbs and Jim Laker had huge calluses. Warne's problems have been with ligaments; he does not appear to damage his skin so much. The philosophies are the same. It just happens that right now there are more good leg-spinners than finger-spinners.

They need not despair. Their turn will come, and when the right bowler emerges he will find modern batsmen ripe for the plucking. But the bowlers need to learn to attack and contain simultaneously; and their coaches need to get out of the belief that the two types of spin are so different that the coaching of them has to be segregated. The principles are the same. And the real secret of both is flair.

Ashley Mallett is director of Spin Australia, which encourages and promotes the art of spin bowling. He played 38 Tests for Australia as an off-spinner.

© John Wisden & Co


http://content-ind.cricinfo.com/wisdenalmanack/content/current/story/153282.html

Shafin
July 1, 2007, 10:32 AM
However,the article is extremely one sided,no mention of subcontinent spinners,no mention of Abdul Kadir, like they never existed,much like the Monty-Raz reporting.

nobody
July 2, 2007, 06:23 AM
There can only be ONE Warne.
He is one of a kind.

ditto.
love him or hate him

Shafin
July 2, 2007, 06:39 AM
Premature. He's not Warney's left sock at the moment.
True,but who cares?
We are not talking about achievements here,but talents.Talent wise,Mohammad Ashraful is with the Sachin's,But he is also not worth Sachins nail-cutter.

battye
July 2, 2007, 10:00 AM
The next Shane Warne is..........





BRAD HOGG!! :D

Gowza
July 21, 2007, 12:11 AM
i don't think cullen bailey will be the next warne, the reason he's been dubbed the next warne is because atm other than macgill he's the only other leg spinner australia has that may have a chance of getting into the test team. we really are running low on quality spinners, the only decent youngsters we have are cullen bailey and dan cullen and imo dan cullen isn't that great (haven't seen enough of cullen bailey to get a good idea of his talent and potential). but one problem for cullen bailey is that he plays for the same state as dan cullen, but dan cullen for the moment is being picked ahead of cullen bailey for state cricket which has given him limited experience at state level so unless he can get really good with limited experience it's going to be awhile before we see him become a match winning test player (if ever).

to be honest i don't think australia will come up with another quality spinner for awhile, macgill will do the job for now, he's definately quality but he's old and once he goes i don't think we'll get a match winner for awhile (sorry but i don't think cullen bailey or dan cullen are going to become great bowlers, they'll be decent but nothing special imo). i mean a few years ago cameron white was meant to be the next warne, his leg spin is horrible a few years on and he's a much better batsman than bowler now.