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Shafin
June 17, 2007, 04:15 PM
When there is a Lara in your team,nobody notices someone with even a 45 avg. because he is a grafter,but with Lara gone,the situation has certainly changed.He is now scrutinized,and to their utter amusement,statisticians found out,he has already passed 700 runs.



Guyanese ‘Wall’ is an understated great
Simon Wilde

If Monty Panesar has been driven to distraction bowling at Shivnarine Chanderpaul, he should perhaps reflect on one telling fact. The slim little Guyanese batsman has such a watertight defence that he has been bowled by a spinner just twice in 103 previous Test appearances. Panesar is far from alone in his frustration. When playing for survival, as he was when he made his great hundred at Old Trafford last week on one good knee and one dodgy one, there is no one harder to remove.
The first time he fell to a spinner was on his debut, as a 19-year-old, in front of feverish home-town support in Georgetown in 1994 – he missed a long hop from England’s Ian Salisbury. The second was at Sydney in 1996, when Shane Warne beat him with a delivery that spun almost 3ft out of the rough; it was, in Warne’s estimation, one of the best deliveries he bowled.
Chanderpaul is of Asian extraction and his game is classically Asian – happier against spin than pace; more comfortable at home than abroad; primarily patient; more cerebral than physically strong. He plays spin through eagle-eyed observation, taking the ball at the last moment, at the very top of the bounce, with the softest of hands – just like Rahul Dravid, arguably the only batsman in world cricket who bats so well in a crisis. But statistically, Chanderpaul leaves even Dravid trailing in his wake. The Indian has been bowled eight times by spinners in his 108 Tests. Chanderpaul deserves to be known as The Wall every bit as much as Dravid. This is a man who batted nearly 13 hours at the start of his previous series in England before losing his wicket.
He bats with the self-contained obsession of the shy small-town boy. When he was growing up in Unity, a fishing community on the Guyanan coast, the villagers arranged to keep the nets supplied with bowlers willing to satisfy his huge appetite for batting.
In an age of unprecedented hitting, he is one of the last of the great blockers, averaging more than 1,000 balls for every six he hits in Tests, but as his high back-lift suggests, he has thought aggressively in the past. He once scored a century against Australia in 69 balls and his strike-rate in one-day cricket is a respectable 70.2.
But like the young Allan Border, he tailored his game to the needs of a struggling team. As he showed during another solid innings on Saturday, he seems to relish crisis management; indeed, has done since he went in at 46 for four on his first-class debut, at the age of 17, and scored 90 against a Leeward Islands attack spearheaded by Kenny Benjamin.
Chanderpaul has been infuriating England bowlers for most of his career.
He scored an unbeaten double-century in his first representative appearance against them – an under-19 Test at Trent Bridge in 1993.
Darren Thomas was one of the England bowlers during that series. ‘He was so solid,’ he recalled. ‘We struggled against him the whole series. We tried to frustrate him by bowling well outside off stump, but it didn’t work. He was not pretty, but he knew his game inside out. He didn’t bother wearing a helmet. It was too easy for him.’
It took Chanderpaul three years of Test cricket to record his first century and eight years to crack the art of converting fifties into hundreds.
It is a surprise to recall that he was dropped during England’s most recent series in the Caribbean in 2004. It was said that he was suffering from lethargy, but like the rest of his team he had struggled to cope with England’s four-strong pace attack.
Chanderpaul’s tendency to shuffle around deep in his crease has served him less well against the fast men than the slow. His record in Australia, New Zealand and South Africa, where the ball often seams, swings or bounces, tells its own tale: in 44 innings, he has only once passed 85.
In the eyes of Allan Donald he invited the lbw, while Wasim Akram noted his susceptibility to being bowled behind his legs. Contrary to the pattern against spin, the left-hander has had his stumps disturbed in 12 per cent of his dismissals by the quicks.
Chanderpaul seems to delight in making people pay for their mistakes. Just as Panesar’s temper in Manchester was all the shorter for him having dropped Chanderpaul before he had reached 20, so England’s collapse to 46 all out in Trinidad in 1994 – Chanderpaul’s second Test – owed something to his having been twice reprieved by Graeme Hick en route to a painstaking half-century that set a stiffer target than had seemed likely.
This West Indies team has been accused of lacking star players, but in his understated way Chanderpaul deserves the description. He is a great batsman, if one for the connoisseur. He has it in him to become the second West Indian after Lara to top 10,000 Test runs (he passed 7,000 Saturday). More importantly, he sets an example to the next generation of West Indians about the virtues of true grit.
— The Sunday Times

Sohel
June 17, 2007, 04:23 PM
excellent dig Shafin. I liked the following:

"Chanderpaul seems to delight in making people pay for their mistakes. Just as Panesar’s temper in Manchester was all the shorter for him having dropped Chanderpaul before he had reached 20, so England’s collapse to 46 all out in Trinidad in 1994 – Chanderpaul’s second Test – owed something to his having been twice reprieved by Graeme Hick en route to a painstaking half-century that set a stiffer target than had seemed likely."

Hatebreed
June 17, 2007, 04:25 PM
Well done Chanderpaul. I know he's a great batsman, and he deserves every bit of attention and respect for all his contribution to the team. If only the other WI players would perform a little more consistently, I believe they can really turn things around.

Shafin
June 17, 2007, 04:34 PM
When Sarwan comes on board,their Batting is World Class,its their Bowling which is the main concern,although lately the've been improving.

WarWolf
June 17, 2007, 06:23 PM
I love to see Chanderpaul batting. His unique style and feet movement is a wonderful thing to watch.

Electrequiem
June 17, 2007, 06:26 PM
I've always been fond of Shivvy's batting. He is an immensely talented, yet underestimated, player.

Sovik
June 18, 2007, 10:34 AM
always been a fan of him. now lara is gone, he would have put up some fight

israr
June 18, 2007, 04:24 PM
Can he achieve what Lara couldn't?

Trigger_Tiger
June 19, 2007, 12:57 AM
I love to see Chanderpaul batting. His unique style and feet movement is a wonderful thing to watch.

Ditto :up:!!!!!

Orion
June 19, 2007, 11:54 PM
I think Saqib will become someone like Chanderpaul in the future. His technique is not picture perfect but he can still keep the scoreboard ticking with few boundaries and mostly singles and doubles. His fielding and spin bowling are plus points in ODIs....with all the stroke makers in BD....Ash...Tamim...Aftab..he is the perfect player to stay in the background away from the spotlight and holding the team together.....I see a lot of potential in Saqib....hopefully he will fulfill them.

One World
June 22, 2007, 01:33 AM
Since ESPN bought Cricinfo there were gradual changes in the reporting with limited subtlety offcourse, the monotonic tone of prejudiced journalism is fading out. Probably the acquirement of the one most popular cricket site by one of the media moghuls of the world has reflected upon the reporters with great impact. Here is a beautiful article from our very own S Rajesh on the silent Muscateer of Guyana (http://content-usa.cricinfo.com/columns/content/current/story/299196.html).

Trigger_Tiger
June 22, 2007, 01:42 AM
Since ESPN bought Cricinfo there were gradual changes in the reporting with limited subtlety offcourse, the monotonic tone of prejudiced journalism is fading out. Probably the acquirement of the one most popular cricket site by one of the media moghuls of the world has reflected upon the reporters with great impact. Here is a beautiful article from our very own S Rajesh on the silent Muscateer of Guyana (http://content-usa.cricinfo.com/columns/content/current/story/299196.html).

Very nicely written :)!!!!!

rah
June 22, 2007, 10:56 AM
i love to see chanderpaul bat. as he has a unique batting action and his a very classy wristy player

Sovik
June 22, 2007, 01:04 PM
doesn't matter if you have a average over 50. still he won't be able to fill brian lara's shoes

ammark
June 22, 2007, 06:22 PM
I've been a big Windies fan throughout... but stopped following after Ambrose and Walsh retired. Great to see Chanderpaul finally being given the applause he so thoroughly deserves. I like his character and attitude at the crease, starting with taking the bail, hammering it at the crease and marking his spot. Congrats Shivvy, you deserve it.

One World
June 22, 2007, 09:00 PM
Congratulation ammark, now you have a baton to carry

Sovik
June 25, 2007, 04:01 PM
always liked chanderpaul. he has a lot on his shoulder to carry. wishing him the best. lara couldn't pass him the torch, it was only the burden

One World
June 25, 2007, 08:55 PM
Chanderpaul is one of my early heros in cricket. Always liked to watch his batting.

Sovik
July 14, 2007, 11:55 AM
he is one of the most polite man i have ever met