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DJ Sahastra
December 14, 2007, 06:10 PM
I am a big fan of Railways (used to spend days on sites reading about Indian Railways, Locomotives (Steam, Diesel, Electric - AC/DC/Combines).

I often wonder what is the Railway network in Bangladesh like. What are the technological achivements (Bridges, Tunnels, conquering Sunderbans) and what are the different types/categories of locomotives, wagons, hauling capacities.

Or better still, pictures from past and present (Steam Engines, even better!). I would like to know if there is a good history of BDR (and i don't mean BD Rangers :) ).

I would like to know in what capacity and to what extent is railways used in Bangladesh. I vaguely remember a train being flagged off from the Indian side going to Bangladesh, a few year back. If i remember correctly, a WDM2 engine looked like hauling some 6 bogies or so.

I wonder what happened to that. Any input/insight would be great.

Nasif
December 14, 2007, 06:30 PM
Here is BD Railway official website, has lots of pictures:
http://www.railway.gov.bd/
Wiki has some info as well: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bangladesh_Railway
Some copy paste follows:

http://www.railway.gov.bd/images/bdmap.gif
Railway tracks

650
Jamuna multi-purpose Bridge, has railway.

zahid
December 14, 2007, 07:26 PM
Kuno Trainer chobi keu dekhan.

Kun kun Train company operate korey.

Kabir
December 14, 2007, 11:38 PM
For going from Dhaka to Chittagong and back, we always used to take Shuborno Express. It was a nice addition to the routes, as it did the following:
1. Coach service - changed the seating arrangement with comfy adjustable seats
2. Daily service - early evening leaving Dhaka; same train returning next morning from Chittagong
3. Express service - it was a new idea; only stopped at Comilla I believe
4. Privatized - I think the first of this sort for Bangladesh
5. A/C - never liked AC, and never took it either...for me, train journeys to Chittagong are for two things; seating in the cafe car and have tea ALL the way and chat with people/make friends; and watching the beauty of the country...always green, always fresh...and most importantly, the wind on my face was the part I enjoyed the most;

My favorite part of Chittagong trip used to be this train journey. I've made many many friends in the train. Always used to leave my seat, and go sit in the food car...and have tea ALL the way. At that time I used to smoke too...so one pack of cig used to be usual. I used to travel at least twice a year to Chittagong...in many cases to pick up my mom from nana'r bari.

Good old days :)

oracle
December 17, 2007, 03:49 AM
I love trains too and have experience from many countries and of course Bangladesh. Currently, I am also a frequent traveller on weekends with Indrail as it is still the best way to see India. In Europe rail is used for business travelers and leisure but this I believe is just taking off in a serious way in India (mostly on the Delhi-Mumbai run).
I would say that the best trains in BD compares well with India but we need to improve generally across all spheres . For example in India the website and reservation system is really good as you can book online and even if you don't get seats you have the reservation against cancellation and the waitlist system which in theory should act against misuse.

On another note, i am thoroughly disppointed with the delay in starting the kolkata-Dhaka rail line. It's a win-win proposition but still manages to be bogged down by stupid bureacratic bottlenecks. In this respect, the example and achievements of China in Tibet is remarkable.

Nocturnal
December 17, 2007, 04:01 AM
Kuno Trainer chobi keu dekhan.
Kun kun Train company operate korey.

both pic were taken in naogaon,bangladesh-
http://img2.freeimagehosting.net/uploads/th.768c497428.jpg (http://img2.freeimagehosting.net/image.php?768c497428.jpg)
http://img2.freeimagehosting.net/uploads/th.f056a6d091.jpg (http://img2.freeimagehosting.net/image.php?f056a6d091.jpg)

Fazal
December 17, 2007, 10:38 AM
DJ,

When I go to BD this winter, I may ride train from Dhaka to Chittagon. Not sure yet as things may cahnge when I go there . If I do, I will post the picture here.

DJ Sahastra
December 17, 2007, 10:55 AM
Very few pics yet, but nice ones. The Jamuna Bridge Pic is in a classic set up. And i sympathise with the guard-on-duty for the steel-girder struss.

The Wikipedia and BD Railways official site - both are a big let down in terms of contents or pictures.

Somehow i feel BD Railways has probably not developed to the extent i thought it should have. I wonder why so given that it could be an ideal means of transportation for the densely populated region. Or is there a some constraint to development of Railways in the region?

Fazal Mamu, hope you get some good pics.

Miraz
December 17, 2007, 11:01 AM
Without this annual picture, you cannot figure out the importance of Bangladesh Railway as a mean of public transport. :)

http://www.interet-general.info/IMG/bangladesh-train-2.jpg

DJ Sahastra
December 17, 2007, 11:06 AM
Miraz,

From Wikipedia site above,

After independence from Pakistan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pakistan) in 1971, only a small length of new tracks were laid out.
As of 2005 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2005), the total length of railroad is 2,706 km.[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bangladesh_Railway/l_note-len) Of that, 923 km are broad gauge (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broad_gauge) (1.676 meter) tracks (mostly in the western region), while the remaining 1,822 km are metre gauge (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Narrow_gauge_railways) tracks (mostly in the central and eastern regions). The gauge problem is being tackled by adding third rails to the most important broad and metre gauge routes, so that they become dual gauge (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dual_gauge).
A major road-rail bridge at Jamuna (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jamuna_River) opened in 1998 to connect the previously isolated east and west rail networks.
As at 2007, the broad gauge does not yet reach Dhaka (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dhaka) the national capital.

Doesn't sound very nice. I wonder if the geographical nature of the region had a say in this or was it merely political and socio-economic factor.

DJ Sahastra
December 17, 2007, 11:10 AM
My biggest compliment to the picture is, if that train can run with that many people, i must say it is the most solid train ever built with a really powerful locomotive and the best rail-system-rail-user combination ever!

The best space-resource-transportation combination ever.

Privately, i am not a big fan of people wearing Lungi/Dhoti and travelling by standing in front of a locomotive. There is always a wind effect that can make you look like a James-Bond on a parachute or Marlyn Monroe in her famous pic.

Nasif
December 17, 2007, 11:12 AM
My biggest compliment to the picture is, if that train can run with that many people, i must say it is the most solid train ever built with a really powerful locomotive and the best rail-system-rail-user combination ever!

The best space-resource-transportation combination ever.

DJ this is a common picture of BD railway, usually local trains. A slip in the grip is death for sure, and amazingly not too many dies from these sort of travels. At least I can't remember any from recent past.

DJ Sahastra
December 17, 2007, 11:24 AM
Nasif,

We have train over-crowding in India, especially the local trains in my hometown Mumbai. When i had to commute to my college, I used to travel with my foot on-board and hand clinging to anything on top and entire body hanging out the train. And i thought nothing can beat our "Mumbai Local trains" in terms of how they are packed.

The picture above beats it many times over, and then a few more.

Any reasons why given so many users, there seems no attempts to a) Increase the Number of Trains or b) Their Frequency or c) Number of Bogies ? I checked through the major schedules and seems like too few locals. And from the Picture above, only few bogies.

Fazal
December 17, 2007, 11:32 AM
Any reasons why given so many users, there seems no attempts to a) Increase the Number of Trains or b) Their Frequency or c) Number of Bogies ? I checked through the major schedules and seems like too few locals. And from the Picture above, only few bogies.

DJ,

Every day I commute to DC using Metro (Train), and its crowded for last 4/5 years (atleast). I can bearly get into the jam-packed train, its a well known problem in DC Metro and still they cannot fix it. USA is one of the richest country and DC is their capital. Now you expect Bangladesh to fix their train crowding issue? You think its that simple?

DJ Sahastra
December 17, 2007, 11:34 AM
<TABLE cellSpacing=2 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD class=Heading>On a side and not-so-relevant note, here is what i found:

Mail/Express Trains From Rajshahi :
</TD></TR><TR class=rowdeep><TD bgColor=#325439 height=1></TD></TR><TR><TD class=bodytext align=middle><!----------------Data Table--------------><TABLE cellSpacing=1 cellPadding=1 width="70%" border=0><TBODY><TR class=rowdeep><TD class=bodytext align=middle>Train No </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>Name </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>Off Day </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>From </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>Departure </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>To </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>Arrival </TD></TR><TR class=rowlight><TD class=bodytext align=middle>6 </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>Rajshahi Express </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>No </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>Rajshahi </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>11:10 </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>Sirajgonj Bazar </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>18:15 </TD></TR><TR class=rowlight><TD class=bodytext align=middle>16 </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>Mohananda Express </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>No </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>Rajshahi </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>08:15 </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>Khulna </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>17:30 </TD></TR><TR class=rowlight><TD class=bodytext align=middle>31 </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>Uttara Express </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>No </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>Rajshahi </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>12:10 </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>Parbatipur </TD><TD class=bodytext align=middle>19:20 </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><!----------------End Data Table--------------></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

Now that Mohananda Express has a sister train running in India by the Name "MahaNanda Express".

4083/4084 Mahananda Express is one of the long-distance trains and runs from New Jalpaiguri to Delhi.

On a side Note, i have 4 PCs at home (2 Desktops and 2 Laptops). Here is how they are named:

1. MahaNanda Express
2. MahaKaushal Express
3. NeelAnchal Express
4. AlakhNanda Express

All of them named after trains back home - as a kid i used to stand and stare at locomotives for hours!

Fazal
December 17, 2007, 11:37 AM
What MahaNanda stans for?

Is it Maha Nanda? Then what Nanda means?

Or is it Mahan Anda ( i.e. honorable egg)

Nasif
December 17, 2007, 11:42 AM
Nasif,

We have train over-crowding in India, especially the local trains in my hometown Mumbai. When i had to commute to my college, I used to travel with my foot on-board and hand clinging to anything on top and entire body hanging out the train. And i thought nothing can beat our "Mumbai Local trains" in terms of how they are packed.

The picture above beats it many times over, and then a few more.

Any reasons why given so many users, there seems no attempts to a) Increase the Number of Trains or b) Their Frequency or c) Number of Bogies ? I checked through the major schedules and seems like too few locals. And from the Picture above, only few bogies.

This picture was probably taken during start Eid holiday. This is the extreme case, usually people will be hanging and traveling on the roof, but it won't be this extreme.

I am not expert in this, but I think our railway is still at its 19th century British structure. BD terrain is certainly a reason for lack of new tracks being laid (river, lakes, streams; and other water body); but that can't be an excuse for this.

Dhaka needs a circular Railroad around the city to sustain its growth. Lack of railroads is another reason for congested roads in Dhaka. Only train in dhaka is the ones that are coming or leaving the city.

I am not aware of any future development of railroad tracks. There has been some talks, few years back, of MagLev trains between Dhaka and Chittagong; but that is dead now as far as I can remember.

Railroad future looks bleak for BD.

Miraz
December 17, 2007, 11:48 AM
This picture was probably taken during start Eid holiday.

The picture was taken after the "Akheri Munajaat" of "Biswa Ijtema". :)

Fazal
December 17, 2007, 11:52 AM
The way they were risking their lives to attend 'Akheri Monajat', the term 'Akheri Monajat' makes sense.

cricket_dorshok
December 17, 2007, 11:58 AM
What MahaNanda stans for?

Its the name of a river passing through Rajshahi.

Kabir
December 17, 2007, 12:00 PM
I am not aware of any future development of railroad tracks. There has been some talks, few years back, of MagLev trains between Dhaka and Chittagong; but that is dead now as far as I can remember.

I think you're right. I heard something along the same lines recently.

DJ Sahastra
December 17, 2007, 12:10 PM
What MahaNanda stans for?

Is it Maha Nanda? Then what Nanda means?

Or is it Mahan Anda ( i.e. honorable egg)




:)

Here is my blog on MahaNanda from a couple of years back.

http://www.xanga.com/induscreed

Search for "Mahananda"

The name MahaNanda has two parts - Maha and Nanda where Maha means "The greatest" and Nanda is a name. To give a simple example, "Maha" can be prepended to almost anything to give it a tinge of greatness.

So MahaYoga = Maha + Yoga = The greatest Yoga and MahaRishi = Maha + Rishi = The Greatest Saint (Rishi) and Mahatma = Maha + Atma = The greatest soul.


Historically or Culturally, Nanda is the name of Lord Krishna's Adoptive Father/Guardian. Lovingly, Lord Krishna is also known as "NandaLala" or "Nanda's Son".


Me liking the names MahaNanda/MahaKaushal/AlakhNanda/Neelanchal etc is basically because they sound quite powerful and serene. For example, Neelanchal is made of "Neela" and "Anchal" which is a reference to the blue sky. "Anchal" is usually a mother's protective covering to her kid - in this case, the blue sky's protective covering around us. AlakhNanda is the name of one of the few rivers that meets and forms river Ganga. MahaKaushal is another train and i think it is in reference to ancient Kingdom of Magadh/Pataliputra etc though i have to dig on it's origins.

Fazal
December 17, 2007, 12:15 PM
Oh no... I was hoping "Mahananda == Mahan Anda, because they sell real good boiling Egg in the train." or something interesting like that.

Now knowing that this train is nothing special, I plan not to ride that train.

DJ Sahastra
December 17, 2007, 12:18 PM
This picture was probably taken during start Eid holiday. This is the extreme case, usually people will be hanging and traveling on the roof, but it won't be this extreme.



Going by the picture, and the relaxed manner and poses by some of the passengers, either the train is going too slow or they are quite used to it.

Nasif
December 17, 2007, 12:20 PM
We need this MagLev @ 581kph between Tekhnaf and Tetulia ;)

<object width="425" height="355"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/VuSrLvCVoVk&rel=1"></param><param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/VuSrLvCVoVk&rel=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="425" height="355"></embed></object>

Or I would still settle with slower speed one from China for Dhaka & Chittagong @420kph ;)
<object width="425" height="355"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/y-54gBLwK3s&rel=1"></param><param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/y-54gBLwK3s&rel=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="425" height="355"></embed></object>

shujan
December 17, 2007, 12:20 PM
Going by the picture, and the relaxed manner and poses by some of the passengers, either the train is going too slow or they are quite used to it.

Does India has this much crowded Trains?

Fazal
December 17, 2007, 12:22 PM
Usually the train goes slow. Plus outside to some is more desirable for enjoying soothing breeze ( rather than be inside the jam-packed train)

DJ Sahastra
December 17, 2007, 12:23 PM
Oh no... I was hoping "Mahananda == Mahan Anda, because they sell real good boiling Egg in the train." or something interesting like that.

Now knowing that this train is nothing special, I plan not to ride that train.

I can tell you this much - in my good old days as a kid, in summer they used to sell nice roasted peanuts with some salt that my mouth waters to just think of.

Come winter, and we used to be treated to "Chana Masala" made by soaking "Chana in water" and then mixing it with liberal "salad-like" choppings of tomato, radish, radish-leaf, onions ... ooooh priceless. The tea in baked-mud-cups (called "Purva" or "Kullhad") with it's aroma of "elaichi" - god i hate the modern day trains with their "Pantry Car" and readymade coffee and dip-dip tea.

It's an honour to have travelled in the last of the steam-engine trains and lived in the past when money was scarce and hearts were big and treats, priceless. :)

DJ Sahastra
December 17, 2007, 12:30 PM
Does India has this much crowded Trains?

There is a seasonal crowd when trains have people packed like herds of cattles/Lambs. Usually, the Summer vacation time when people return from cities to their villages and summer-end when they head back to their plac of livelihood.

In Metros (Bombay atleast), the trains are packed to an extent that you get good body message and if you drop a 100/- note, it will stay in it's place until the train comes to a stop - no one can dare to even bend and pick it up.

But one difference is - Trains have very high frequency. In Bombay, we have local trains every 2 minutes - yes, every 2 minutes. No rooms left to increase either the frequency or the number of bogies - or even the number of tracks (they have 6-tracks running in parallel for the most stretch, 4-tracks at some). Only link or alternate routes have 2-tracks.

Never sen anything like the picture above, but i am sure some train in Bihar with people going to attend Lalu's rally will look exactly like that.

Nasif
December 17, 2007, 12:37 PM
Does India has this much crowded Trains?

Here is one I found, its the Mumbai crowd:

http://bp1.blogger.com/_fVtcnir-XXA/Rqgga14gCVI/AAAAAAAAACo/c76wLwV_ob0/s400/mumbai-local-train-crowd.jpg (http://bp1.blogger.com/_fVtcnir-XXA/Rqgga14gCVI/AAAAAAAAACo/c76wLwV_ob0/s1600-h/mumbai-local-train-crowd.jpg)
Crowd in Local Train, Mumbai


http://mumbaipicture.blogspot.com/2006/05/mumbai-local-train.html

DJ Sahastra
December 17, 2007, 12:38 PM
Nasif,

I am not sure if you raelly need a Maglev (given it's prohibitive cost).

But you definitely need trains that can touch like 200 KMPH without the prohibitive costs of technology. You need solution for the masses rather than the privileged :).

Nasif
December 17, 2007, 12:45 PM
Nasif,

I am not sure if you raelly need a Maglev (given it's prohibitive cost).

But you definitely need trains that can touch like 200 KMPH without the prohibitive costs of technology. You need solution for the masses rather than the privileged :).

I was just kidding, see the ;)

Kabir
December 17, 2007, 02:52 PM
DJ,

May be of some help. The trains in Bangladesh are used in a much more innovative way than you can think of. The people think that when there's windows, why use doors? Coz that way, you get your RANDOM ACCESS SEAT than SERIAL ACCESS to your seat. Just pick your seat, and jump right in...through the window.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/images/39519000/jpg/_39519602_bangladesh300ap.jpg

Kabir
December 17, 2007, 02:54 PM
This is the picture of Komlapur Rail Station...the station for Dhaka. I heard that this once used to be largest station in Asia...I wonder how many other stations existed back then.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v193/Bangladesh/railwaystation.jpg

DJ Sahastra
December 17, 2007, 03:32 PM
This is the picture of Komlapur Rail Station...the station for Dhaka. I heard that this once used to be largest station in Asia...I wonder how many other stations existed back then.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v193/Bangladesh/railwaystation.jpg

Seems like they tried to model Komalapur after "Komal" or "Kamal" (Lotus) as we call it.

Looks very nice.

I also notice that there don't seem to be many people using it. Is it closed or something?

DJ Sahastra
December 17, 2007, 03:37 PM
DJ,

May be of some help. The trains in Bangladesh are used in a much more innovative way than you can think of. The people think that when there's windows, why use doors? Coz that way, you get your RANDOM ACCESS SEAT than SERIAL ACCESS to your seat. Just pick your seat, and jump right in...through the window.

You have to give it this much that these trains were very strong and sturdily built. Years and years after blatant abuse (In old days, I have seen people pull out wooden sleepers, take away train-lights and fans with the hope of using them home - they must be so disappointed cos Indian trains use DC power source and special fans/lights that don't work on AC regular supply).

They show some scratches, paints getting dull, some rust, get a little creaky on wheels but generally stay rugged and unflinching. Despite taking such strong beatings, they keep chugging on and on.

Nasif
December 17, 2007, 03:41 PM
Seems like they tried to model Komalapur after "Komal" or "Kamal" (Lotus) as we call it.

Looks very nice.

I also notice that there don't seem to be many people using it. Is it closed or something?

Its not Kamal, instead Komola which means Orange (the fruit orange). Komolapur = Place of Orange (suffix pur usually refers to place/location).

Komolapur Railstation.

Bangla for orange color is "komola" as well; like komola rong/rang. So this might refer to Place of Orange Color :)

DJ Sahastra
December 17, 2007, 03:42 PM
What about the locomotives? Are they manufactured locally or imported? Atleast the engine in that picture looks different than any that i have seen so far (Indian, foreign included).

Is there a history of evolution for the locomotives? I am sure you had some good classy steam engines inherited from the early British Rail Network. Are their any sites to look at those black giants in their full glory? I find the diesel locomotives somewhat boring (though still interesting) and electric ones very lifeless (no huffing and puffing).

DJ Sahastra
December 17, 2007, 03:45 PM
Its not Kamal, instead Komola which means Orange (the fruit orange). Komolapur = Place of Ornage (suffix pur usually refers to place/location).

Komolapur Railstation.

Bangla for orange color is "komola" rong/rang. So might refer to Place of Orange Color :)

Okay, that is totally out of the blue. The hindi-Bangla correlation fails miserably here :).

I wouldn't have even dreamt that Komala has anything to do with Oranges. Apart from "Kamal" (lotus), maybe "Komal" (soft) is the only closest meaning that could've come to me.

Thanks for correcting.

Kabir
December 17, 2007, 03:50 PM
Seems like they tried to model Komalapur after "Komal" or "Kamal" (Lotus) as we call it.

I think you're right about that. That's the only logical explanation I guess.

I also notice that there don't seem to be many people using it. Is it closed or something?

That's because this was taken on a day when there's not gonna be ANYBODY. I find it quite amusing that there's nobody there, coz this is a BUSY location.

Also, I think this pic is a bit old. The last time I went to BD was in '03 and inside the station looked like this. To the left are ticket counters. You can see the type of people that you'll find there on a regular day.

http://hansmast.com/images/bangladesh/Day%208/th-23-093107-DSCF4022.jpg

Nasif
December 17, 2007, 03:51 PM
Okay, that is totally out of the blue. The hindi-Bangla correlation fails miserably here :).

I wouldn't have even dreamt that Komala has anything to do with Oranges. Apart from "Kamal" (lotus), maybe "Komal" (soft) is the only closest meaning that could've come to me.

Thanks for correcting.

The important factor here is "a" at the end; komola, or kamala however you want to write it. Bangla pronunciation makes the silent A, make O vowel sound; as in Rong, instead of Rang ([বাংলা]রঙ[/বাংলা])

Kamal in Bangla is Lotus [বাংলা]কমল[/বাংলা]
Komol in Bangla is soft [বাংলা]কোমল[/বাংলা]
Komola is Orange :)

Kabir
December 17, 2007, 03:55 PM
Here's the platform in Dhaka station.

http://www.rmtbristol.org.uk/bangladesh_rail_station.jpg

Beamer
December 17, 2007, 04:01 PM
I always wondered why the area is called Komlapur?or Kamalapur? Any idea? Never seen any orange groves anywhere near. It borders Shahjahanpur, Rajarbagh, Sabujbagh, Khilgaon localities of East Dhaka..

Kabir
December 17, 2007, 04:06 PM
Here's a page with some resources that you might be looking for, DJ.
http://www.irfca.org/~shankie/brly/banglarailway.htm

A decreipt mg steam engine of Bangladesh Railways, possible awaiting breaking up. The origin of the machine is not very clear. While the sqarish firebox enclosure os typically British, the smokebox front is typical of the American WD locomotives.
http://www.irfca.org/~shankie/brly/bry798.jpg


A bg 0-6-0 of the Bangla Railway. Note striking resemblance to the ubiquitous Pakistan Railways 0-6-0. These engines are no more in service.
http://www.irfca.org/~shankie/brly/bangla.jpg


A ng steamer of Amaar Shonaar Bangla Bangladesh Railways. Note striking resemblance to our own Little Shantipur engines of class CS, once used on the ER. These engines are no more in service.
http://www.irfca.org/~shankie/brly/banglacs.jpg


And finally, there are a few Indian engines in that page too.

Fazal
December 17, 2007, 04:06 PM
May be becuase its (the platform) the (night) residence of all the homeless working class Komola Bibis.

Beamer
December 17, 2007, 04:11 PM
May be becuase its (the platform) the (night) residence of all the homeless working class Komola Bibis.

That would be Ramna Park? I saw some one evening right by the Kakril Mashjid trying to hussle some tabligi jonogon from a rickshaw. It was funny..

Nocturnal
December 17, 2007, 05:03 PM
and this OUR "The Narail Express (http://content-www.cricinfo.com/columns/content/story/288111.html)" :)

http://usa.cricinfo.com/db/PICTURES/CMS/72900/72974.jpg

DJ Sahastra
December 17, 2007, 05:12 PM
Nocturnal, below is the correct picture of Narail Express :)

and this OUR "The Narail Express (http://content-www.cricinfo.com/columns/content/story/288111.html)" :)

http://usa.cricinfo.com/db/PICTURES/CMS/72900/72974.jpg
http://www.indianrailways.gov.in/images/wag9-6000hp-v1.jpg



Btw WAG-9 is rated at 160 KMPH :).

Nocturnal
December 17, 2007, 05:14 PM
Nocturnal, below is the correct picture of Narail Express :)

eh, click on the Narail Express link (in my post) and you will see the real one with time table :-p

DJ Sahastra
December 17, 2007, 05:19 PM
Look at the Color scheme of that locomotive (one of th most powerful and advanced in the arsenal of IR) and the "Narail Express".

Btw WAG-9 is rated at 160 KMPH :).

DJ Sahastra
December 17, 2007, 05:37 PM
Kabir, IRFCA is a good site. I have spent days after days gourging it like patrick from spongebob squarepants. I used to own a site "indian-railways.com" which i lost thanks to the folly of the site that was supposed to keep it active (they failed to remind me of my annual payment).

Some nice steam locomotives but in general, there is a lack of interest and history on part of BD Railways is what i gather.

RazabQ
December 21, 2007, 02:47 AM
Am I the only one here who has more than a passing connection with BR? My grandfather was a guard in Bangladesh Railways and my earliest memory of him is him explaining me what those FM slabs were.
http://irfca.org/~apub/mgmysmrj/YDM4MYS4.jpg
It stands for Fouling Mark and denotes the point of contact for two trains on merging tracks. When older, I recall operating some of the hydraulic points system for changing tracks (yes highly irregular). And also have fond memories of being able to ride on any train I wanted as a kid, mentioning my gramps name and get free cha nasta from the guard on duty and a possible trip to the end cabin and engine room. Aaah so many memories ...

Arnab
December 21, 2007, 03:31 AM
Any reasons why given so many users, there seems no attempts to a) Increase the Number of Trains or b) Their Frequency or c) Number of Bogies ? I checked through the major schedules and seems like too few locals. And from the Picture above, only few bogies.

Here's the very general answer:

We Bangladeshis are piss poor, we have too many people with too few resources, we don't know how to handle money, we don't know how to obey rules, we talk too much and we suck big time when it comes to solving real problems. The percentage of know-it-all or stupid people is probably the highest in the world. Smart people leave Bangladesh as fast as they can, which worsens the problem.

Common people in Bangladesh have accepted their fate here. They don't have much self respect. Deep down they have accepted that they are stupid, that they suck and that they will never be as good as other better countries. They don't trust their government much. They don't hope for a very bright future. They are quite fatalistic, have no ambition in general in terms of competing with other countries and make do with whatever they have at their disposal. Religion, general ignorance and kind of a blasé attitude keeps them calm and content most of the time. The overriding mantra is as always: If life serves you a lemon, make lemonades. Well, Bangladeshis are the most efficient lemonade makers in the whole world. There's no other country where there is so few resources for so many people, and yet they get by every day. When Bangladeshis see a bright person amongst them, they don't cherish his company and try to make him useful, instead they urge him to leave the hellhole as quickly as possible.

Apply the above to every aspect of Bangladeshi life, including your questions about Bangladesh Railways, and you will arrive at the correct answer very soon.

PS. Where does cricket fit into all this, one may ask? Well, having an international team in cricket for Bangladeshis is like a fantasy, an opiate, an escape from reality.

insideedge
December 21, 2007, 09:42 AM
DJ, WAG9 is for goods service.It is used for its horse power, rather than for its speed. For passenger service, you are more likely to have something like WAM4.

For Diesel locos, it is WDG3 for goods service, and WDM3 for express trains there days, though WDM2 continues to be the workhorse.

insideedge
December 21, 2007, 09:52 AM
http://irfca.org/~apub/mgmysmrj/YDM4MYS4.jpg

The above picture is of a MG locomotive of DLW, Varanasi make, which means that this locomotive has been imported from India.

insideedge
December 21, 2007, 10:11 AM
Mahananda is a river originating in the Himalayas that flow down into Bay of Bengal via Bengal and Bangladesh. Interesting to note that both countries have a train each named after the river. The Indian train originating from New Jalpaigudi in Bengal is named after this river.

DJ Sahastra
December 21, 2007, 11:09 AM
Am I the only one here who has more than a passing connection with BR? My grandfather was a guard in Bangladesh Railways and my earliest memory of him is him explaining me what those FM slabs were.
http://irfca.org/~apub/mgmysmrj/YDM4MYS4.jpg
It stands for Fouling Mark and denotes the point of contact for two trains on merging tracks. When older, I recall operating some of the hydraulic points system for changing tracks (yes highly irregular). And also have fond memories of being able to ride on any train I wanted as a kid, mentioning my gramps name and get free cha nasta from the guard on duty and a possible trip to the end cabin and engine room. Aaah so many memories ...

RazabQ,

I had my Fufaji (my Dad's sister's Husband) at a prominent position in Indian Railways but never got much opportunity of any extra-perk - he was not so keen. I had to wait until my early 20s to be able to actual ride inside a locomotive (Diesel Locomotive like the one posted above) - not only that but i was the official "Horn-Boy" for an entire trip of 3 Hrs courtesy a close friend of My Dad who used to operate a Shuttle train in Bombay. Never knew that even the pattern of blowing the horn has different meanings! It was like one of those things that Money can't buy - priceless.

Your picture above reminds me of a typical train-station in Indian interior - a single track branching out (usually into 3 - one mainline for passing trains and 2 on the either side of the mainline for a slightly elevated platforms). As a kid, i used to stand and stare for hours, especially during my annual trip to my native-place or village. I used to enjoy the token-exchange (The primitive lead-ball token-exchange system where used to ensure only one train gets the token at a time). he ball would be kept inside a ring that would be held either by a stational attendant or on an elevated pole with Ring-clamps. At night, the ring-clamps used to be doused in kerosene and lit - for the drivers to see where the token was and grab the token-ring.

The station-master's cabin used to be one one cling-clang place with a few red-blue bulbs and typical "Haan ... Down Aath Hazaar Battees Kee Kya Position Hai ... achcha, nikal chuki hai" (What is the position of 8032 DN .. Oh it has left) folowed by a one one bell-sound to indicate that a train has left the adjoining station and is headed towards your station. When the train is visible or at the "outer signal", you would have 3 or more bell-sounds to get ready.

At many places, those niceties have been replaced by newer equipments and almost no bell-sounds, only announcements.

DJ Sahastra
December 21, 2007, 11:21 AM
Here's the very general answer:

We Bangladeshis are piss poor, we have too many people with too few resources, we don't know how to handle money, we don't know how to obey rules, we talk too much and we suck big time when it comes to solving real problems. The percentage of know-it-all or stupid people is probably the highest in the world. Smart people leave Bangladesh as fast as they can, which worsens the problem.

Common people in Bangladesh have accepted their fate here. They don't have much self respect. Deep down they have accepted that they are stupid, that they suck and that they will never be as good as other better countries. They don't trust their government much. They don't hope for a very bright future. They are quite fatalistic, have no ambition in general in terms of competing with other countries and make do with whatever they have at their disposal. Religion, general ignorance and kind of a blasé attitude keeps them calm and content most of the time. The overriding mantra is as always: If life serves you a lemon, make lemonades. Well, Bangladeshis are the most efficient lemonade makers in the whole world. There's no other country where there is so few resources for so many people, and yet they get by every day. When Bangladeshis see a bright person amongst them, they don't cherish his company and try to make him useful, instead they urge him to leave the hellhole as quickly as possible.

Apply the above to every aspect of Bangladeshi life, including your questions about Bangladesh Railways, and you will arrive at the correct answer very soon.

PS. Where does cricket fit into all this, one may ask? Well, having an international team in cricket for Bangladeshis is like a fantasy, an opiate, an escape from reality.

Arnab,

I was expecting responses more on the lines of lack of funds or lack of government interest in rail projects or maybe Bangladesh terrain is not ideally suited for Railways or maybe government is more keen on road or waterway infrastructure or maybe Railways is making huge losses on account of people not buying tickets etc.

What you posted on the contrary has left me depressed. I hope it was only a vent-it-out post and is not close to any reality.

DJ Sahastra
December 21, 2007, 11:29 AM
DJ, WAG9 is for goods service.It is used for its horse power, rather than for its speed. For passenger service, you are more likely to have something like WAM4.

For Diesel locos, it is WDG3 for goods service, and WDM3 for express trains there days, though WDM2 continues to be the workhorse.

InsideEdge,

I posted the WAG-9 picture for it's color-scheme since someone posted Mashrafe "Narail Express" in his Green and Tellow outfit.

And yes, the Alco-designed WDM2s have been the priceless workhorses of IR - i still remember the earlier models which used to huff and puff while accelerating with 20+ bogies - More like the sound of "Chhha-Chhha-Chhhhha-Chhhhha-Chhhhhaaa" with black smoke bellowing for a couple of seconds after which you don't even see any signs of smoke.

The newer models got rid of even that initial-acceleration smoke (to a hopeless romantic like me, that's a big loss :) ).

bharat
December 21, 2007, 11:46 AM
Bangladesh Railways and me have a connection...

My Dad ..more than a year in BD (around Dhaka) as a young civil Engg. reconstructing the railway lines that were damaged by the Pakistani army as they left the country after the liberation movement.

As my dad recalls it was an herculian task with major railway points completely broken and had to build from scratch.Added to that was the Monsoon which cretaed problems for my dad and his crew.

My dad till date cherishes his time in BD...he says he was taken over by the love by the people on the country side...let me remind him abt this when I call him during the weekend ..cheers.

BD railways and me go a long way together ..Dont we:)

Kabir
December 21, 2007, 12:33 PM
Haha, nice bharat. May be your dad can also answer a few questions for DJ :)

Nocturnal
December 21, 2007, 12:34 PM
thanks for sharing your story - bharat :)

insideedge
December 21, 2007, 12:45 PM
There are some stations in Bengal from where goods trains pass between two countries. Based on the observations of the Bangladesh wagons that come to the Indian side, the Bangladesh Railway is still following the older technology vacuum brake system in their goods trains.

DJ Sahastra
December 21, 2007, 12:56 PM
The above picture is of a MG locomotive of DLW, Varanasi make, which means that this locomotive has been imported from India.

It looks like a YDM-4 or a variant of YDM-4.

ammark
December 21, 2007, 01:05 PM
http://irfca.org/%7Eapub/mgmysmrj/YDM4MYS4.jpg


As regards to the above picture, It looks like an Indian Railways Locomotive to me, as well as the yellow railway signboard is not so common in BD stations. The Station name is mostly written on White cement signage-structure

Bangadesh Railways (BR) locomotives and carriages are painted in green for freight and local train/mail locomotives and blue+cream stripe for passenger trains and inter-city routes as in:

http://www.interet-general.info/IMG/bangladesh-train-2.jpg

This picture above is quite well-spread among textbooks.... a similar one was in one of mine in Canada. It is used to portray the overcrowding, lack of resources, the weak infrastructure, etc of the developing world. However, the context of the photo is that every year, Tongi, a town just north of Dhaka hosts a massive religious gathering called the Bishwa Ijtema, that gets concluded by the mass congregation doing 'munajat' (raising their hands to seek repentence and blessings from God). For this mass munajat, people hail these special train services, crowd on buses and trucks, make a mess and a jam through the airport road, in uttara, ashulia and on the trains.

As for the limited history I know of Bangladesh Railways, it is heavily biased to the Eastern Side of the Railway system. Secondly, it is based on what I heard from my father who is Chittagonian and my Khalu who is Sylheti who both grew up at a time the remnants of the Raj were packing up and leaving in the 1960s.

Bangladesh Railways was instituted mostly as the Assam-Bengal Railways in the 1870s. It was created before the broad gauge gained favour, and thus had metre gauge implemented east of the Padma (Ganga)-Jamuna (Brahmaputra). The main workshop and the headquarters of this Railway Corporation was in Chittagong.

The main purpose of this railroad, as has been argued by many scholars of colonialism was to gain access to the north east hinterland of India. The tea plantations were being set up and the railroad's main purpose was to strengthen communication (ie, placement of the British into the hinterland of Assam to oversee the entireprises and lands in the Raj) and freight access to the plantations from near the then capital Calcutta.

For example, in my khalu's (uncle) home village railway station, somewhere around Monu Bridge, near Kulaura, there is still in use a table of Mahogany or teak, brought in the 1870s for the ABR, from Jaisalmer (or some other Indian city with a similar name, maybe Jaipur). On it, its has ABR inscribed, then scratched off and replaced with EPR (East Pakistan Railways) and then scratched off and replaced with BR. This area is the southern tip / start of the Tea Plantations of Northeastern India going northwards.

Currently Bangladesh Railways has large holdings of hills, quarters, bungalows and land in the centre of Chittagong City. This is a legacy of the Raj, with Chittagong's Highest Hill (Fairy Hill) being owned by current BR, and some of the most serene and scenic areas belonging to the Railways. Chittagong and Sylhet Railway stations are relics of the Raj... left to get dilapidated until recently GrameenPhone paid for their restorations.

The railway route has at many places continued onto Assam and West Bengal. In the case of Tripura, there is a station not far from Agartala (forgot the name, not Laksham though falls on route to Chittagong). Where the station and the railways is in Bangladesh, but the boundary wall is the border with Tripura. Secondly, its because the British instituted Laksham, Comilla and Akhaura, Brahmanbaria as major junctions that currently trains from Sylhet and Chittagong greatly use these otherwise outback village and provide an impetus to the communications, access, economic activities of these areas.

Historically, the presence of the ABR, further drove Chittagong's economic buildup with Chittagong Port being opened for local shipping. Many Scottish tea companies, Lipton, Shaw-Wallace, Duncan & Duncan, James Finlay, etc were based from Chittagong (the last to leave was James Finlay) who managed their gardens and got their freight down to Bengal through this railway. The exploration and finding of oil in Digboi, Assam and Burma, led to the establishment of Burma Eastern Oil Company based in Chittagong.

World War II also increased the use of the ABR, as the US Army set airbases at Shamshernagar, Moulvi Bazar and Kurmitola (current ZIA), Dhaka to fly supplies "over the hump" to Kunming, China. Their internal supplies and set up relied on the ABR, brought from Calcutta. This was especially true for the air bases the US Army had in Assam too. Mainamati Cantonment, with Feni Airfield was established by the British in Comilla in 1943 as a forward headquarter for the battle of Imphal and the fight in Burma. The ABR being there was a big factor, as the railway was a major supply line.

For more history, this is a good writeup at Banglapedia: Eastern Bengal Railway
http://search.com.bd/banglapedia/HT/E_0012.htm

Assam Bengal Railway: http://search.com.bd/banglapedia/HT/A_0332.htm

Hardinge Bridge: http://search.com.bd/banglapedia/HT/H_0054.htm

History of Railways in Bengal: http://search.com.bd/banglapedia/HT/R_0048.htm

Moshin
December 21, 2007, 01:11 PM
Do you think Bangladesh one day will have trains like this 1:
(Im guessing in hundred years time or so I think???)
http://www.millennialliving.com/weblog3/archives/japanese-bullet-train-in-station.jpg

Arnab
December 21, 2007, 01:42 PM
Arnab,

I was expecting responses more on the lines of lack of funds or lack of government interest in rail projects or maybe Bangladesh terrain is not ideally suited for Railways or maybe government is more keen on road or waterway infrastructure or maybe Railways is making huge losses on account of people not buying tickets etc.

Those are all true. But I was going deeper. It's not exactly venting out. It is the reality. I haven't seen anything change in the last 30 years. And my elders say it was the same in their days, too.

You should not be depressed about it. Tens of millions of Indians go through the same thing. It's a subcontinental thing.

DJ Sahastra
December 21, 2007, 03:54 PM
Those are all true. But I was going deeper. It's not exactly venting out. It is the reality. I haven't seen anything change in the last 30 years. And my elders say it was the same in their days, too.

You should not be depressed about it. Tens of millions of Indians go through the same thing. It's a subcontinental thing.

Arnab,

I am sure there are tens of millions who fall into the mould that you have described. But i am also sure for each of those, there is other who is keen to go out there and compete and demand change.

If that belief is taken away, i would definitely be a very depressed man.

Parisa
December 21, 2007, 03:56 PM
Do you think Bangladesh one day will have trains like this 1:
(Im guessing in hundred years time or so I think???)
http://www.millennialliving.com/weblog3/archives/japanese-bullet-train-in-station.jpg

by the time these high speed trains arrive in bamgladesh we would have won the world cup!

DJ Sahastra
December 21, 2007, 03:56 PM
Mohsin,

That bullet train is ultra-cool. Actually, to countries like India, Bangladesh, it is much more feasable than a MagLev.

If BD really wants them, i guess you'll see it in 5-10 years time-frame (not in 100 years). It's all about the available resources and political will.

Moshin
December 21, 2007, 04:01 PM
Mohsin,

That bullet train is ultra-cool. Actually, to countries like India, Bangladesh, it is much more feasable than a MagLev.

If BD really wants them, i guess you'll see it in 5-10 years time-frame (not in 100 years). It's all about the available resources and political will.
are you really sure about that? India would have it already then, seeing
them as the new industralized country

Arnab
December 21, 2007, 04:27 PM
Arnab,

I am sure there are tens of millions who fall into the mould that you have described. But i am also sure for each of those, there is other who is keen to go out there and compete and demand change.

Not really. If that were the case, Bangladesh or India would have been a top tier country. We aren't. We suck.

If that belief is taken away, i would definitely be a very depressed man.

You know what cures depression the best? Not sitting and sobbing about whether somebody took your belief away, but working your *** off.

shaad
December 21, 2007, 04:58 PM
Do you think Bangladesh one day will have trains like this 1:
(Im guessing in hundred years time or so I think???)
http://www.millennialliving.com/weblog3/archives/japanese-bullet-train-in-station.jpg

Of course not, Mohsin. How would our countrymen sit comfortably on the roof of such a fast, smooth train? :)

insideedge
December 21, 2007, 11:21 PM
It the subcontinent, people want fast trains, but at the same time, they want it to stop at all stations, and they want the fare to be dirt cheap. Obviously , all that is infeasible.

Railways are very capital intensive, even for routine operations. So political will and financial resources are needed for any big project.

It is much cheaper to talk about the past and the present.

DJ Sahastra
December 22, 2007, 02:37 PM
Not really. If that were the case, Bangladesh or India would have been a top tier country. We aren't. We suck..

Given the contraints, we haven't done too badly either.

Specifically in case of Bangladesh, given what the country has gone through, i won't say i am disappointed. Definitely hoped to see it standing somewhere better (and that was quite possible with a little prudence and forward thinking from the leaders in post-71 era) but definitely not hopeless or desolate at where it stands today.

Same applies for India (i think i am in pretty positive mood today - i avoid posting when i am on the other side of the bridge).

Now, i'll be glad to hear something from you on why BD didn't invest in Railways (2000 Kms of rail network is a poor account, IMO).

DJ Sahastra
December 22, 2007, 02:39 PM
"It the subcontinent, people want fast trains, but at the same time, they want it to stop at all stations, and they want the fare to be dirt cheap. Obviously , all that is infeasible."

That's feasible in India. You start a bullet-train service between Delhi and Calcutta and make it pass via Bihar. People in Bihar will ensure they get fast-trains for cheap (zero cost) that stops at all station.l

Moshin
December 22, 2007, 04:40 PM
Of course not, Mohsin. How would our countrymen sit comfortably on the roof of such a fast, smooth train? :)
:lol: i forgot about that man but they can handle it they are>>> Bangladeshis:smug:

Parisa
December 22, 2007, 04:42 PM
:lol: i forgot about that man but they can handle it they are>>> Bangladeshis:smug:

with a bit of trainin....

Moshin
December 22, 2007, 04:47 PM
no training needed... extremism is all within the genes of bengaliz!

Nocturnal
December 22, 2007, 05:14 PM
no training needed... extremism is all within the genes of bengaliz!

care to explain .....may be example??
or it's just a comment!

Beamer
December 23, 2007, 12:23 AM
Of course not, Mohsin. How would our countrymen sit comfortably on the roof of such a fast, smooth train? :)

They will find a way. Don't under estimate our folks. dorkar hoiley roshi pechaya uthbo. Just yesterday I read, a few died while traveling on top of a train ( free off course ), going home for Eid break , and the overhead bridge couldn't fit them through. They will adapt. Lie down next time, and if its a bullet train, a good quality nylon rope will do..

Arnab
December 23, 2007, 02:27 AM
Given the contraints, we haven't done too badly either.


Yeah right. Give me a break. Look at France. Look at Germany. Not one, but TWO world wars were fought by these two nations. Look at Japan after WW2.

It's nothing sort of astonishing how these nations bounced back after such devastating losses. India or Bangladesh have never experienced the magnitude of loss suffered by these countries.

Yet, look how they bounced back! It's astounding! There's something in their collective spirit, there's something in their blood that makes them extremely hard workers and take the world by its collar and turn it around.

We are worthless, spineless gits compared to these great nations.

BD-Shardul
December 23, 2007, 09:59 AM
Of course not, Mohsin. How would our countrymen sit comfortably on the roof of such a fast, smooth train? :)

Why not? Shopno dekhte to kono dosh nai. When we will have such train in our country, our coubtrymen will be rich people.

Moshin
December 23, 2007, 12:40 PM
care to explain .....may be example??
or it's just a comment!
well we all know what we bengali's are capable of.:D

DJ Sahastra
December 24, 2007, 11:19 AM
Yeah right. Give me a break. Look at France. Look at Germany. Not one, but TWO world wars were fought by these two nations. Look at Japan after WW2.
It's nothing sort of astonishing how these nations bounced back after such devastating losses. India or Bangladesh have never experienced the magnitude of loss suffered by these countries.
Yet, look how they bounced back! It's astounding! There's something in their collective spirit, there's something in their blood that makes them extremely hard workers and take the world by its collar and turn it around.
We are worthless, spineless gits compared to these great nations.
Arnab,
Going by the in-depth level of knowledeg in sub-continental matters displayed by you, i am sure you are only teasing me. Nonetheless, here i go with my rants.

Comparing with Germany and France is a good thing to look for inspiration but not good to criticize our own development.

Neither Germany nor France had to face a prolonged systematic leeching out of any and all form of economic life-support the way India under the British rule was. To convert sub-continent into a big-market for finished goods, the local artistry/craftsmanship and essentially their livelihood and with that the village's infrastructure and support was destroyed systematically. Economically, the plunder was absolute. The village economy could never recover - not even today.

The kind of challenges posed due to diversity, both in terms of people/culture/language/food/economy and most importantly, resources is nothing that Germany or France ever faced. The sub-continetal model of economy was a micro-model with every village self-sufficient and self-reliant until they were made colonies with beggar's bowl.

With independance came the challenge to feed a million hungry and to fight the omnipresent natural calamities in forms of floods and famines. Much of the resources had to diverted for survival rather than development work. If that wasn't enough, we chose to keep open issues (India-Pak, Kashmir, China etc.) which eventually thrust even more burden on the paltry resources.

Germany and France's model couldn't have been emulated in our part of the world. Afterall, even hardwork cannot improve your living conditions beyond a point - ask that to poor hardworking people anywhere.

I can go on and on but the simple point is - we have problems of maginitude many times more than any of the european countries with far too less per-capita resources.

One World
December 24, 2007, 11:42 AM
DJ,

Every day I commute to DC using Metro (Train), and its crowded for last 4/5 years (atleast). I can bearly get into the jam-packed train, its a well known problem in DC Metro and still they cannot fix it. USA is one of the richest country and DC is their capital. Now you expect Bangladesh to fix their train crowding issue? You think its that simple?

Bro you remind me the days I used to go from Takoma Parc to Metro Station at work and to Fairfax for Uni. Yes they were jampacked mostly but I always enjoyed it although I did this for two years.

As for Bangladesh I took the Surma express a lot and it was fun to take trains. I always managed to get sits. The horrific experience was riding on the roof of a locomotive at my early days while going home for one eid celebration (the express service did not start that time). While the train was crossing Voirob bridge people onthe roof were signalling behind to keep our head down. That was the first and last. Never made to Eid leaving Dhaka again.

Arnab
December 24, 2007, 04:27 PM
DJ, what you just wrote is a stock response that I have been listening to since my childhood. Needless to say, I think it's bullshit.

Less per-capita resources you say? When the Brits left India and Pakistan (and consequently Bangladesh) on our own, what was the population here and per-capita resources? And what are they now? Are you going to blame the British Raj for our incredible birth rate and exploding population as well?

RazabQ
December 25, 2007, 05:43 AM
Are you going to blame the British Raj for our incredible birth rate and exploding population as well? Well, when you are poor, and infrastructure is under-developed, one's entertainment options becomes _VERY_ limited ... as does the means to prevent side-effects from said entertainment "activities" :D

So yes, you could argue the Brits were to blame :)

Arnab
December 26, 2007, 02:25 AM
Well, when you are poor, and infrastructure is under-developed, one's entertainment options becomes _VERY_ limited ... as does the means to prevent side-effects from said entertainment "activities" :D

So yes, you could argue the Brits were to blame :)

That's simply not true, Q. The Brits gave us two sports we love the most: Football and Cricket.

DJ Sahastra
December 26, 2007, 02:41 AM
That's simply not true, Q. The Brits gave us two sports we love the most: Football and Cricket.

Not true, Arnab.

In my village, Cricket was unheard of until Kapil's Devils pulled off that famous heist of '83.

And footbal never caught up our imaginations beyond a couple of states (West Bengal, Kerala, Maybe Goa Too).

On a side note, your "When the Brits left India and Pakistan (and consequently Bangladesh) on our own, what was the population here and per-capita resources? And what are they now? Are you going to blame the British Raj for our incredible birth rate and exploding population as well?" needs detailed analysis and response.

Arnab
December 26, 2007, 03:44 AM
Not true, Arnab.

In my village, Cricket was unheard of until Kapil's Devils pulled off that famous heist of '83.

And footbal never caught up our imaginations beyond a couple of states (West Bengal, Kerala, Maybe Goa Too).


Ok, may be not the rest of the Indian states, but Bengal. Bengal has always been the first in adopting British and Western customs.

ammark
December 26, 2007, 07:42 AM
Ok, may be not the rest of the Indian states, but Bengal. Bengal has always been the first in adopting British and Western customs.

And one hangover of that is the obsolete way we conduct our communication in English (and maybe day-to-day life as well), almost grovelling at every step to anyone white or sitting on an office-chair draped with a towel.

Arnab
December 27, 2007, 05:30 PM
And one hangover of that is the obsolete way we conduct our communication in English (and maybe day-to-day life as well), almost grovelling at every step to anyone white or sitting on an office-chair draped with a towel.

That's not unique to British rule. Bengali people have always been subservient. When the Mughals were in power, we used to speak in Farsi. We always treated our own language, Bengali, as dirt. And we always treated some other language, like Farsi (and to some extent Arabic) and then English, as much better than our own. Bengali people are usually subservient people who fear the languages of power and religion and feel no shame in putting those above their own mother tongue.

oracle
December 28, 2007, 05:16 AM
Bengali people are usually subservient people who fear the languages of power and religion and feel no shame in putting those above their own mother tongue.


OK,just one question. When is this period of self flagellation that you are going through going to end.:waiting:

Arnab
December 28, 2007, 07:00 AM
Criticism may not be agreeable, but it is necessary. It fulfills the same function as pain in the human body. It calls attention to an unhealthy state of things. --- Winston Churchill

It is not the critic who counts, not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled, or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly, who errs and comes short again and again, who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, and spends himself in a worthy cause, who at best knows achievement and who at the worst if he fails at least fails while daring greatly so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat. --- Theodore Roosevelt.

One World
December 28, 2007, 02:57 PM
There is a big buzz going on about esatablishing a 52 KM long Subway service underground Dhaka. The project is predicted to start on June 08 and supposed to be "completed" in 4 long years. A massive 6200 crore taka has been planned to be invested with a joint venture between CONTECH Ltd. a local firm and a Japanese Bank. The technology chosen is the Chinese application of superconducting magnets over Maglev technology.

While thats an exhilerating information its also a big concern for the inhabitants of this mega city that how much status quo would appear in their already traffic, load-shading, water crisis burdened municipal life.

Pros:
1. An economical transport system at the end of project.
2. A big shift towards modernized capital.
3. Better punctiality and cost-time ratio in offices

Cons:
1. A prolonged journey for 4 years which will cause havoc in the total surface transport due to digging and clamour
2. 4 years >> 14 years?
3. The already poor drainage system will be highly disrupted, side effect other cable related utilities.
4. Increased crime due to underground spaces
5. Bums with alarmingly increasing population
6. The base of buildings mostly not ready enough to handle the seismic pressure of such tunnelling.