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View Full Version : Its the Qualitative Expeience that matters


israr
June 29, 2008, 06:37 PM
Our recent outcomes of matches against the 'superior 8' have been quite excruciating, a dichotomy when compared with the Whatmore era, when everyone just seemed to be in an ebullient mood. However, amidst all those sprightly moments, we were lost in overwhelming ecstacy, unaware of the potential appalling situations that could affect us in future.
<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-comhttp://www.banglacricket.com/alochona/ /><o:p></o:p></FONT></P><P><FONT color=black>Remember? The golden Zimbabwean team of late 1990s and early 2000s? Just when the team had turned a corner, the exacerbating political scenarios inside the nation eventually resulted in all their veterans to abandon the game. Emtered the scene are a talented bunch of black cricketers, who in their raw youth, found it difficult to grapple the pressure of international cricket, and imminent results followed. With the elapsing of time, there were encouraging signs, but the 'original problems' still persisted in their play. It would be wrong to say these resulted from their extreme inexperience. Likes of Chigumbura and Taylor have been around for four years now,and statistically, have been a part of more than 60-70 ODI campaigns for <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = <st1:place w:st="on">Zimbabwe</st1:place></st1:country-region>.<o:p></o:p>
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Switching to cricketers hailing from different parts of the world. Players like Michael Clark, Graeme Smith, Salman Butt, Dhoni, made spectacular entries in their international career and contrived to maintain that level of consistency with phenomenol success. In a short span of time, these players evolved into reliable performers and became integral members for their respective teams. Whereas for that same period and no. of matches played, the Chigumburas and the Masakadzas failed to emulate the accomplishments of their predecessors. So, what significant factor really acted as a catalyst for the players from 'elite 8', which the minnows didn't possess? Yes, you guessed it right. Its experience, but don't be perplexed with the word experience used for quantitative purposes, its the qualitative experience that I am focusing on.<o:p></o:p>
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When Whatmore took over, he first worked in effacing the defeatist attitude from our players approach to a match, which he successfully did. The occasional wins came along, and everyone believed <st1:country-region w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">Bangladesh</st1:place></st1:country-region> had 'turned over a new leaf leaf'. However, the perennial problems still existed. Gifting wickets, throwing away good starts , loosing wickets at regular intervals, unable to build partnerships still lurked with our players even after consistent minnow bashing and attaining the 9th spot in ODI ratings. Undoubtedly, Whatmore was a great coach, but somewhere down the line, we still weren't witnessing any changes at all in the perilious batting approach adopted by our batsmen. However, victories never dried up, due to his shrewd planning and 'particular' motivational techniques that made our cricketers more hungry as they aspired to achieve greater things on the field. In the process, we slowly became more dependant on the filial love and support from Whatmore.<o:p></o:p>
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Its worth to note that in between those 'glorious' victories, we were still thrashed convincingly like minnows in most of the games against the 'top 8'. Ashraful, Aftab and their comrades never really had a prolonged run of good form and consistency against the major nations. Whatmore was well aware that the solution of this problem wasn't within his grasp, therefore he did his bit to conceal it temporarily for as long as he was assigned the task. As a result, Ashraful and Aftab, our two potential match winning batsmen, had to 'learn' everything by themselves. They never had the privilege of someone vastly knowledgeable 'senior' beside them who could usher them to the right path, instead, they were all on their own, searching for that 'recipe of success'. Just because they were bestowed with such 'awe-inspiring' stokeplay from the Almighty, and found it so naturally easy to dominate over aggressive bowlers with their prodigious talent that they were often guilty of throwing away their wickets. However, continual failures with the bat developed a common notion amongst fans that 'they'll never learn' and also raised questions about their level of commitment.<o:p></o:p>
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I can recall an interview of Michael Clark where he said that the presence of Hayden, Ponting alike played a crucial role, when asked about the reasons for his success. He further stated that the amount of knowledge he acquired from his fellow aces helped him mature significantly within few years of international cricket. Similarly, Smith had the luxury and comfort of the current pillars of South African cricket, that is, Kallis, Gibbs, Boucher around to shoulder the main responsibilty when handed over captaincy. Salman Butt, who is younger than Ashraful, and whose record of ODI matches is lesser than him, still manages to boast of better average, more centuries, and a higher 'best score in an innings'. Hence, there is clearly a very strong correlation between the success of a rookie player and the no. of established veterans in the team. And this correlative factor is, qualitative experience, which enhances the rate of success of a novice player as he progresses in his international career.<o:p></o:p>
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Qualitative experience, unlike quantitative experience, is what you gain from your 'senior' counterparts, which is most needed and effective during on-field action. When Dhoni's 148 massacred Pakistan, Rahul Dravid, possesing almost a decade of 'quality international' exposure , was involved with him in the partnership and constantly monitored Dhoni's innings which benefitted him as he received 'valuable' information and advices from Dravid throughout. These are the dimunitive aspects of the game which a new player keeps on grasping from his 'seniors' during matches and a phase is reached when he has more than enough of the 'gained qualitative experience' and applies it with great effect that brings in about consistency and better results in his individual career. This qualitative experience might seem trivial, but it is not only curtialed to the theoretical knowledge of a cricket legend and probably has greater 'realistical' depth and 'practical' significance. <o:p></o:p>
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Coming back to Bangladeshi cricket, during the last days of Whatmore era, and from then onwards, things just became uglier. Those rash strokes and indiscipline in batting followed and the foibles in our cricket remained. Consequently, Sakib's image as a 'Bangladeshi Chanderpaul' began to tarnish and even Tamim, a revelation for us in the World Cup, became more unorthodoxical in his approach that reached its summit during the T20 WC as he looked increasingly 'clueless' with the passage of time. Things were back to 'sqaure one' as post-Whatmore events transpired. With due respect to Whatmore and his coaching achievements, it became all the more clear after his departure that his goal was to keep the Bangladeshi team 'afloated' with parental-like guidance and motivation for as long as he was around and somehow affirm that with positive results till he had the tenure as <st1:country-region w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">Bangladesh</st1:place></st1:country-region> coach. Results just before and after he left is now not hidden from anyone as the deficiencies resurfaced again.<o:p></o:p>
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Since Siddons took over, Tamim Iqbal's fortune with the bat changed dramatically in international cricket. All of a sudden, he had rediscovered his original himself, and started fulfilling the role of an 'un-fickled' opener appreciably long needed by <st1:country-region w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">Bangladesh</st1:place></st1:country-region>. Sakib once again reclaimed his deserved title after a bit of procrastination. On a bigger picture, our batsmen looked more assured and in control over themselves even after flying starts, and there were less frrquent instances of 'rush of blood'. Raqibul Hasan seems to be the latest addition amongst quite a few of Bangladeshi batsmen to put up consistent scores of late. All these were something that certainly wasn't discernible in our batsmen during Whatmore's period of coaching. And ofcourse, the factor that seems to have bought this change is the qualitative experience our players are receiving from our current coach, Siddons, which Whatmore failed to do in his time with our boys.<o:p></o:p>
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Its very pleasing to see Tamim and Sakib and a few others contributing heavily with the bat, which suggests that Jamie Siddons is providing our younsters with the qualitative experience of his days as an Australian first-class cricketer, acting as a benefactor for our boys. No wonder then most of our batsmen, low in quantitative experience, are already living up to their promising talent. Sounds similar to the new entrants of the 'big boys', right?!<o:p></o:p>
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If Siddons hadn't come to the scene, we'd still probably witness the same old 'inconsistent' Tamim, and once again impatient fans would raise doubts about his commitment and professionalism. This was exactly the script during Whatmore's era, fans accusing batsmen for all the reasons they could, whereas the fact was our batsmen gained little qualitative experience, in complete contrast to their rapid gain in quantitative experience' that deceived the 'outsiders' into a delusion our batsmen shall never improve.<o:p></o:p>
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The mission of Siddons is wholly different to that of Whatmore, and his diligent and conscientious endeavours with Ashraful to get him back amongst the runs in a ‘clinical manner’ is all a part of his qualitative experience that he is providing our captain with, and there are already encouraging ‘signs’ of it, although it is still prosaic and not the way we would like to see it. Regarding the subject of Aftab, its unfortunate that he never really settled under the new coach dur to the injury blow on his head, and therefore didn’t have the ‘smooth’ adaptation of his batting style. Whatsoever, its heartening to see he’s still persisting with certain players on whom even most of our die-hards had renounced their hopes. This probably shows the faith he has on our young lads and also the belief that the qualitative experience he will pass on will surely reap fruitful results in the future.<o:p></o:p>
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Siddons’ reluctance to push for a victory have attracted its fair no. of critics as well. However, I wonder how they would have differed only if we had a substitute for those butter fingers in the game against <st1:country-region w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">India</st1:place></st1:country-region>. Therfore, this whole issue of negativity and being circumspect is just a matter of time until all our departments ‘click’ together, which will be sooner rather than later because under Siddons, it is less likely that we will have repeat performances of BD vs WI match in CT 2006 or the BD vs NZ match in WC07, where our over-zealous batsmen lost their way after fantastic starts due to lack of qualitative experience in such situations.<o:p></o:p>
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To sum it up, when the current set of Bangladeshi players will posses more than adequate qualitative experience, our cricketers of posterity shall never suffer like their predecessors as our era of dominance shall commence and the face of Bangladeshi cricket will be changed forever.<o:p></o:p>
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cricman
June 29, 2008, 06:46 PM
Just too add on or paraphrase what Israr said

Chanderpaul said the side was not helped by the lack of a big group of senior players. "It is hard at times because you have a bunch of young guys, and they are learning, but they are learning slowly," Chanderpaul told AFP.

"When I came into the team, I had a bunch of senior fellows around - men who played their cricket tough - so it was easy for me to learn from them, but we have a whole heap of young guys and there are not a lot of senior players to guide them. But we are trying to mould them, and they are learning, but they are not learning fast enough, because at this level you need to learn fast."

israr
June 29, 2008, 06:58 PM
Just too add on or paraphrase what Israr said

Cricman, thank you so much! You don't know how you've helped me in doing this!
I guess people will now understand more clearly what I am trying to express in my post..
Once again, thank you brother:big_hug:!

Murad
June 29, 2008, 07:14 PM
Well written Israr. :up:

You've summed up everything very well.

Our players never had the opportunity to learn from their seniors. That's one of the main reason why the younger players always came and gone after few matches/series.

Another reason why our young batsmen never learned from their mistakes is because they had never given a good batting coach by the BCB. If they had given a good batting coach for the team, then Ashraful, Aftab & Kapali would have been averaging in 35-40 now. It was their bad luck that they were under the crap BCB management.

Now after Siddons, batting specialist, came in, our batsmen started doing well. Most of them learning from their mistakes. That's because he's a good batting coach. He can find the mistakes the batsmen doing and he can teach them how to overcome them, which none other coach has done before as they were specialist in nothing except being a head coach.

If things go like this under Siddons, our batsmen will be winning many matches for us, Inshallah.

Now what we need for these young cricketers are a good bowling and fielding coach from overseas. Bowling coach must be a former bowler. And the BCB should SACK the current bowling coach who is good for nothing. He will take our bowlers no where. They will remain where they are.

nahaz
June 29, 2008, 08:24 PM
Hey Israr, good post man! Not trying to give u "thel". U're absolutely right in terms of experience...but I think it's his experience in coaching Australian team rather than his playing career that really helps. He's been lloking for consistent performances rather than flukes, which has improved our overall standard already. I guess all of his critics can see it now. His willingness to give everyone a long run also might have made the players feel more secure ,thus they're able to give their best.If he can make S Nafees Sakib-like consistent , now that would really be sth.

I guess siddons wasn't used to speaking to the media, so his comments in the first few months were misinterpreted. <b>Notice how Alok mentioned in today's Prothom-Alo that he was confident in doing well since he's got his team out of tough situations numerous times in Premier and National Leagues. </b> Our players haven't had the experience in getting team out of trouble at all, collectively speaking. Prob bowlers more than the batsman. Ourplayers very nervous when they took the field after scoring 283 against India. Once we experience a few close games we'd eventually start winning them. Only time will tell how often.

One World
June 29, 2008, 08:41 PM
Nice post, well written. But quality vs quantity is not the main issue for our team.
Also the future does not seem to be too bright. Refer to current performance of A and U19 teams.

But good to read it, not just another thread.

BD-Shardul
June 30, 2008, 01:17 AM
Very well written Israr Bhai. :notworthy::notworthy::notworthy:

israr
June 30, 2008, 03:08 AM
Also the future does not seem to be too bright. Refer to current performance of A and U19 teams.

But good to read it, not just another thread.

Oh brother, performances at the junior level can be very deceiving and fluctuates rapidly. And one loss in T20 doesn't mean our future is bleak.
Cheer up man! We're in for many brighter things in the coming years.

israr
June 30, 2008, 03:17 AM
Thanks to everyone in this thread!

Sadz
June 30, 2008, 03:58 AM
Israr, this has been a more positive and realistic thread for a while now..well done. However, we need to get better junior level coaches because the younger lot are falling behind. I know it was Bangladesh A vs Ireland senior but some of these players have played at international level and even they played like rookies. Well- thought thread nonetheless.

Sohel
July 1, 2008, 03:47 AM
Quality stuff Israr and thank you for it ... :)

Beamer
July 1, 2008, 10:57 AM
Good stuff Israr. Time well spent reading it. Thanks.

Tigers_eye
July 1, 2008, 11:25 AM
Excellent thread Israr. Good read indeed.
Just too add on or paraphrase what Israr said
Chanderpaul said the side was not helped by the lack of a big group of senior players. "It is hard at times because you have a bunch of young guys, and they are learning, but they are learning slowly," Chanderpaul told AFP.

"When I came into the team, I had a bunch of senior fellows around - men who played their cricket tough - so it was easy for me to learn from them, but we have a whole heap of young guys and there are not a lot of senior players to guide them. But we are trying to mould them, and they are learning, but they are not learning fast enough, because at this level you need to learn fast."
Our and their seniors are not comparable. Each established team has/had seniors who can guide the new comers. Ours couldn't guide themselves let alone guide the juniors. The house cleaning was necessary. Hopefully we will stick with these core players for a long time and start the guiding process for generations to come.

bujhee kom
July 1, 2008, 11:59 AM
Whatmore was well aware that the solution of this problem wasn't within his grasp, therefore he did his bit to conceal it temporarily for as long as he was assigned the task. As a result, Ashraful and Aftab, our two potential match winning batsmen, had to 'learn' everything by themselves. They never had the privilege of someone vastly knowledgeable 'senior' beside them who could usher them to the right path, instead, they were all on their own, searching for that 'recipe of success'. Just because they were bestowed with such 'awe-inspiring' stokeplay from the Almighty, and found it so naturally easy to dominate over aggressive bowlers with their prodigious talent that they were often guilty of throwing away their wickets...o:p></o:p>
<o:p></o:p>
Since Siddons took over, Tamim Iqbal's fortune with the bat changed dramatically in international cricket. All of a sudden, he had rediscovered his original himself, and started fulfilling the role of an 'un-fickled' opener appreciably long needed by <st1:country-region w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">Bangladesh</st1:place></st1:country-region>. Sakib once again reclaimed his deserved title after a bit of procrastination. On a bigger picture, our batsmen looked more assured and in control over themselves even after flying starts, and there were less frrquent instances of 'rush of blood'. Raqibul Hasan seems to be the latest addition amongst quite a few of Bangladeshi batsmen to put up consistent scores of late. All these were something that certainly wasn't discernible in our batsmen during Whatmore's period of coaching. And ofcourse, the factor that seems to have bought this change is the qualitative experience our players are receiving from our current coach, Siddons, which Whatmore failed to do in his time with our boys.<o:p></o:p>
<o:p></o:p>
Its very pleasing to see Tamim and Sakib and a few others contributing heavily with the bat, which suggests that Jamie Siddons is providing our younsters with the qualitative experience of his days as an Australian first-class cricketer, acting as a benefactor for our boys. No wonder then most of our batsmen, low in quantitative experience, are already living up to their promising talent. Sounds similar to the new entrants of the 'big boys', right?!<o:p></o:p>
<o:p></o:p>
If Siddons hadn't come to the scene, we'd still probably witness the same old 'inconsistent' Tamim, and once again impatient fans would raise doubts about his commitment and professionalism. This was exactly the script during Whatmore's era, fans accusing batsmen for all the reasons they could, whereas the fact was our batsmen gained little qualitative experience, in complete contrast to their rapid gain in quantitative experience' that deceived the 'outsiders' into a delusion our batsmen shall never improve.<o:p></o:p>
<o:p></o:p>
The mission of Siddons is wholly different to that of Whatmore, and his diligent and conscientious endeavours with Ashraful to get him back amongst the runs in a ‘clinical manner’ is all a part of his qualitative experience that he is providing our captain with, and there are already encouraging ‘signs’ of it, although it is still prosaic and not the way we would like to see it. Regarding the subject of Aftab, its unfortunate that he never really settled under the new coach dur to the injury blow on his head, and therefore didn’t have the ‘smooth’ adaptation of his batting style. Whatsoever, its heartening to see he’s still persisting with certain players on whom even most of our die-hards had renounced their hopes. This probably shows the faith he has on our young lads and also the belief that the qualitative experience he will pass on will surely reap fruitful results in the future.<o:p></o:p>
<o:p></o:p>
Siddons’ reluctance to push for a victory have attracted its fair no. of critics as well. However, I wonder how they would have differed only if we had a substitute for those butter fingers in the game against <st1:country-region w:st="on"><st1:place w:st="on">India</st1:place></st1:country-region>. Therfore, this whole issue of negativity and being circumspect is just a matter of time until all our departments ‘click’ together, which will be sooner rather than later because under Siddons, it is less likely that we will have repeat performances of BD vs WI match in CT 2006 or the BD vs NZ match in WC07, where our over-zealous batsmen lost their way after fantastic starts due to lack of qualitative experience in such situations.<o:p></o:p>
<o:p></o:p>
To sum it up, when the current set of Bangladeshi players will posses more than adequate qualitative experience, our cricketers of posterity shall never suffer like their predecessors as our era of dominance shall commence and the face of Bangladeshi cricket will be changed forever.<o:p></o:p>
<o:p></o:p>



ruhaan israr bhai, you always write beautifully with clarity and deep insight! when you were away from bc for a while you were missed!
thank you for pointing out those specifics from our situation and i am right here with you, expecting the days of good cricket to arrive.

israr
July 1, 2008, 12:54 PM
ruhaan israr bhai, you always write beautifully with clarity and deep insight! when you were away from bc for a while you were missed!
thank you for pointing out those specifics from our situation and i am right here with you, expecting the days of good cricket to arrive.

Thanks brother:big_hug:, very touched with your post:).
No worries this time, I am back:D......., and hopefully, we all together shall enjoy many 'happy moments' as exciting times are ahead for Bangladesh cricket.