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al Furqaan
June 17, 2009, 12:27 AM
Just had a novel idea for a thread. This would definitely help people like me and any other newbies to get a grasp of the essential aspects of cricket. This is a purely fan-centric thread and intended to be a discussion of whatever the poster wants. It just has to be about a cricketer in some way, shape or form.

My ultimate goal is to basically have an encylopedia of info - but i need other members help, particularily the foreign BC members - and eventually have this as a sticky atop the forum.

So lets discuss individual cricketers, and what we know about them. This should be beyond the "Ashraful is an idiot" type posts. I want to see a really professional scouting assessment, something deep and thought requiring as well as thought provoking.

Without further ado, I will get the ball rolling. First cricketer up for discussion, the Little Master, Sachin Ramesh Tendulkar.

Zeeshan
June 17, 2009, 12:43 AM
Delight to watch for purists and non-pursits alike. His lines and balance are beautiful. A testament to the fact that if you apply 'what you got' instead of wishing 'what you don't have' to what heights (pun intended) you can reach.

IMHO should be the next candidate for "Sir" upadhi.

Zeeshan
June 17, 2009, 12:47 AM
Asad bahi,

Could you please post 5 of his top innings whether Test or ODI (preferably with youtube links)?

Rifat
June 17, 2009, 12:50 AM
Umar Gul:

simplistic, yet very efffective

Syed Rasel:

Bangladeshi version of Umar gul :-p("our occasional secret weapon")

Yuvraj Singh:

transcends all in terms of consistency, a textbook cricketer: rare talent

Russell2k7
June 17, 2009, 12:54 AM
AB de Villiers: what an amazing cricketer. Monster from the Greek mythology...he is like a right handed version of Yuvraj Singh.

Zeeshan
June 17, 2009, 01:00 AM
Jonty Rhodes: still unparalleled in terms of magnificent diving fielding and direct throws. He would pounce like a cheetah on a ball as if springs are attached to his feet. If you don't see him in real time, you wouldn't know what you are missing. He certainly created a niche for himself. A Michael Jordan of fielding. Certainly the greatest ever.

Zeeshan
June 17, 2009, 01:07 AM
Paul Gogga: One hit wonder. Credited with creating the chinaman, not the mod of course.

Rifat
June 17, 2009, 01:11 AM
more on Johnty Rhodes: an idol for modern day cricket fielding(current developing players look up to him to polish their fielding) from FTP standards(that online game again ;)) he is truly a legendary fielder(a skill above which no other exists)!

for those who don't know, here is how a players skill is rated in FTP(atrocious being the absolute worst, legendary being nothing better):

atrocious
dreadful
poor
ordinary
average
reasonable
capable
reliable
accomplished
expert
outstanding
spectacular
exceptional
world class
elite
legendary

Zeeshan
June 17, 2009, 01:18 AM
Nawab of Pataudi. Of course never seen him play. (Perhpas youtube video exist?) But heard a lot about him. He is the only Test cricketer to have played for both England and India. Wisden Cricketer of the Year 1932. His son, Monsoon married Sharmila Tagore and freak of nature Saif Ali Khan was born who danced to the famous song "Javi ko larki dekhum mera dilde wana bole Oye! Oye! O-way!"

Zeeshan
June 17, 2009, 01:24 AM
Samuel Barclay Beckett. First-class cricketer for Ireland. Left handed player. Only played two matches in his entire life, without any stellar record. Why is he prominent? Won Nobel Prize for literature.

Zeeshan
June 17, 2009, 10:43 AM
I thought Saif ali Khan's grand dad (Iftikhar Ali Khan) played for both India and England but not his father.

That's what I meant/wrote.

mahbubH
June 17, 2009, 01:13 PM
That's what I meant/wrote.
sorry ...

Tigers_eye
June 17, 2009, 02:57 PM
With adversities after adversities facing, you become a legend and you are still playing the game with no fuss that is ...... being ultimate professional.

Signed Murali.

Tigers_eye
June 17, 2009, 02:58 PM
Before the T20 there was De Silva.
Before De Silva there was Sir Richards.

Zeeshan
June 17, 2009, 03:26 PM
Waugh brothers.

Steve Waugh: Master of Square Cut.
Mark Waugh: Great fielder, batsman for whom the Twin Paradox doesn't apply ;)

Zeeshan
June 17, 2009, 03:34 PM
Inzam-ul-Haq: Guy with the most run-outs. Calling him fat just doesnt suffice. Loves to eat banana in the crease during break. Powerful hitter of ball when enraged.

BD-Shardul
June 17, 2009, 03:50 PM
Inzam-ul-Haq: Guy with the most run-outs. Calling him fat just doesnt suffice. Loves to eat banana in the crease during break. Powerful hitter of ball when enraged.

Shane Warne on Inzy: His bat looks like a tooth-pick on his hand.

RazabQ
June 17, 2009, 03:59 PM
Hmm this thread is bordering more on poetic rather than prosaic ... here's my effort to take it another direction.

Gavaskar: attritional, immensely focused, tremendous mental strength, limited repertoire of strokes, ultimately overrated. His exploits against pace is not all that it was made up to be - it was against a weakened Windies, and he didn't win that many. But, given the generation he came from, he was the first Indian batter to basically go "I don't give an F to who you are" and was the inspiration for the Tendus, Dravids, et al. My fave innings, that 90 something in his final test on a raging turner.
Alan Border: same as above, except underrated - he was a better skipper and a handy SLA.
Imran Khan: dude made Mash's off-cutter look Kumbl-esque in terms of deviation. I saw him once hit S Waugh in the head with a bouncer and the ball had pitched at the edge of the pitch and come in. That high-leap action was gorgeous to behold and he really was a surprisingly compact and elegant batsman.

more later ...

WarWolf
June 17, 2009, 04:06 PM
Abdul Qadir: Non arguably the most talented leg spinner ever born. Though he didn't cross so many mile stones like Kumble or Warne, he mastered the art of leg spin in every way. Even Warne once told that Abdul Qadir is the best.

Tigers_eye
June 17, 2009, 04:10 PM
Abdul Qadir: Non arguably the most talented leg spinner ever born. Though he didn't cross so many mile stones like Kumble or Warne, he mastered the art of leg spin in every way. Even Warne once told that Abdul Qadir is the best.
The word Googly is attached to his name.

Rifat
June 17, 2009, 04:48 PM
Sachin Tendulkar: by far the most successful cricketer both on and off the field.

Courtney Walsh & Curtley Ambrose: legendary West Indian pacemen.

Allen Donald: the 90s version of Dale Steyn

Zeeshan
June 17, 2009, 05:05 PM
Mohd. Azharuddin: Helmetless master blazer of ball. (God I really miss his game!) Wide range of strokes (if my childhood memory serves right.) Precursor to Sehwag. He and Sachin could gun down any reqd. run rate.

al Furqaan
June 17, 2009, 07:57 PM
guys a little more verbosity is desired by the thread creator...try to follow razab bhai's example. just a short para per player is enough.

its also meant to be a discussion

One World
June 17, 2009, 07:58 PM
Craig McDermott: McDermott was a rhythm bowler. When his rhythm was right, he would have an aggressive approach to the wicket and an excellent sideways-on action, giving him sharp pace and outswing.Father of Alistair of Queensland, went bankrupt, had viedo tape incidents - this guy went through a lot. First line is from wikipedia and I think that is right. I saw him how he troubled Sub Continental players in their own condition. But yes he was not up to the parr against the WI but English players will remember him for his ferocity and accuracy in seaming wickets.
ODI 453 (http://www.cricinfo.com/statsguru/engine/match/65093.html)
ODI 465 (http://www.cricinfo.com/statsguru/engine/match/65105.html)
ODI 475 (http://www.cricinfo.com/statsguru/engine/match/65115.html)
Final 477 (http://www.cricinfo.com/statsguru/engine/match/65117.html)

al Furqaan
June 17, 2009, 07:58 PM
Hmm this thread is bordering more on poetic rather than prosaic ... here's my effort to take it another direction.

Gavaskar: attritional, immensely focused, tremendous mental strength, limited repertoire of strokes, ultimately overrated. His exploits against pace is not all that it was made up to be - it was against a weakened Windies, and he didn't win that many. But, given the generation he came from, he was the first Indian batter to basically go "I don't give an F to who you are" and was the inspiration for the Tendus, Dravids, et al. My fave innings, that 90 something in his final test on a raging turner.



anyone who can face pacers who are even 80 mph without a helmet deserves a high degree of praise. especially if he maintains a 50+ career average and scores 10K runs.

hell, tendy and sehwag would be considered cowards compared to him.

One World
June 17, 2009, 08:06 PM
Saqlain Mushtaq: To the cricket world known as the inventor of Doosra, both the word and the style which is perfectly put by the commentators' as the Other One. Saqlain is one of those under achievers who can be considered similarly set with the pace giant Aqib Javed, with innovative and improvisability he faded away in the crowded giants like Qadir and then Mushtaq, also because of the high dependency of Pak Cricket to its pacers compared to spinners. There was a talk around London town that he might play for England few days back but it remained as a rumour till now.

One World
June 17, 2009, 08:22 PM
Hashan Tilakratne: Not your favorite Srilankan Boom Boom batsman, rather a classy lower middle order, holding the fort with tenacity to frustrate the best of the opponent pacers of the likes that breed like mushrooms in Pak and WIndies. In a Sharjah Cup final how he single handedly made Ranatunga capture the cup while all the Srilankan wickets were falling like matchsticks on the other side, was a real treat to the eye - excluding the scene when he really fell sick, took of his helmet and started vomitting near the first slip. An ill cricketer, boldly fought for his nation to win the cup for his country.

Rifat
June 17, 2009, 08:29 PM
Hashan Tilakratne: Not your favorite Srilankan Boom Boom batsman, rather a classy lower middle order, holding the fort with tenacity to frustrate the best of the opponent pacers of the likes that breed like mushrooms in Pak and WIndies. In a Sharjah Cup final how he single handedly made Ranatunga capture the cup while all the Srilankan wickets were falling like mathcsticks on the other side, was a real treat to the eye - excluding the scene when he really fell sick, took of his helmet and started vomitting near the first slip. An ill cricketer, boldly fought for his nation to win the cup for his country.

he is currently known as TM Dilshan: who demolished frail, fragile Bangladeshi bowling lineup in a test in 2009, currently opens with Jayasuriya

One World
June 17, 2009, 08:36 PM
he is currently known as TM Dilshan: who demolished frail, fragile Bangladeshi bowling lineup in a test in 2009, currently opens with Jayasuriya

Not the same player. Hashan is way senior, Dilshan started his career in 1999 only. I misspelled, its Tilakaratne. Full name is Hashan Prashantha Tilakaratne (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hashan_Tillakaratne)

But thanks for the comment, it made me dig a little more and I did not know he was a WK as well during his early career!

One Day International Centuries

<table class="wikitable" style="font-size: 100%;" align="center"> <tbody><tr> <th colspan="7">ODI Centuries of Hashan Tillakaratne</th> </tr> <tr> <th width="40">
</th> <th width="50">Runs</th> <th width="50">Match</th> <th width="100">Against</th> <th width="175">City/Country</th> <th width="200">Venue</th> <th width="50">Year</th> </tr> <tr> <td>[1]</td> <td>104</td> <td>71</td> <td>West Indies (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Indies)</td> <td>Mumbai (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mumbai), India (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/India)</td> <td>Wankheda Stadium (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Wankheda_Stadium&action=edit&redlink=1)</td> <td>1993</td> </tr> <tr> <td>[2]</td> <td>100</td> <td>111</td> <td>West Indies (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Indies)</td> <td>Sharjah (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sharjah), UAE (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UAE)</td> <td>Sharjah Cricket Association Stadium (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sharjah_Cricket_Association_Stadium)</td> <td>1995</td></tr></tbody></table>

It is the second one I am talking about. :up:

WarWolf
June 18, 2009, 12:07 AM
Donald Bradman: The most successful batsman on the earth ever born. Who ruled the best bowlers with his bat like a sword. The dirty tricks like body line bowling from the English team couldn't stop him. He finished his carrier averaging 99.94 in tests. Due to the second world war, he lost 8 years in his peak days.

Garfield Sobers: Unarguably he is the most talented all rounder ever born. An aggressive left handed batsman and a bowler who could bowl different varieties from spin to fast-medium pace was a treat to watch. He started his carrier as a SLA later who later added varieties of china man bowling. Some times he used to open bowling with his fast medium seaming action. He scored more than 8000 runs in test cricket averaging 57.78 and claimed 235 wickets. Sobers became the first batsman ever to hit six sixes in a single over in first class cricket.

WarWolf
June 20, 2009, 03:28 PM
Akib Javed: This wonderful talented fast bowler from Pakistan was born in a wrong time and place. He has been a master of all the weapons that a fast bowler can possess. As he had to compete with Wasim Akram and Waqeer Younus, he never could be considered as the main strike bowler for Pakistan.

One World
June 20, 2009, 08:08 PM
Brian Charles Lara: The cricketer who disappointed me most all through his career. After showing glimpse of rooting any opponent at any match regardless of conditions he was one of the best cricketers around that I would like to follow and use every single chance to watch him play live. But recent memories of watching him does not ring a bell when he really flashed up to his talent against quality opponent. Tendulkar, even Jayasurya produced more fun for me. But definitely his early career before he started skipping the side seats him to the throne of the King.

Zeeshan
October 18, 2009, 01:14 AM
Asad vai, no need to thank me for resurrecting your mummified thread...swaddling. But, no encylopedia will be complete without profile of:

Six Giants of the Wisden Century (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_Giants_of_the_Wisden_Century)


W G Grace
None of these (other great players), not even Sir Jack (Hobbs), dominated for decades all other players, none of them lasted so long. In a way he invented what we now call modern cricket. His national renown packed cricket grounds everywhere. He laid the foundations of county cricket economy. The sweep of his energy, his authority, and prowess, his personal presence, caused cricket to expand beyond a game. His bulk and stride carried cricket into the highways of our national life. He became a representative Victorian, a father figure.[1]

Jack Hobbs

Sir Jack is the only cricketer of whom we might fairly say that he directly descended from W.G. fully-armed, like Jove. I never saw him make an uneducated stroke. When he misjudged the nature of a ball he could, naturally enough, make the wrong right stroke. He not only enlarged and subtilised the art of batsmanship; he, like W.G. widened and strengthened cricket's appeal and history.
...the vintage Hobbs, the Master of our time...

Tom Richardson

I choose Richardson as one of my Six, not on the supposition that he was the greatest fast bowler of the century, though certainly he was in the running. I take him as the fully realised personification of the fast bowler as every schoolboy dreams and hopes he might one day be himself. Richardson was, in his heyday, a handsome, swarthy giant, lithe, muscular, broad of shoulder, and of apparently inexhaustible energy. He was indeed the ideal fast bowler, aiming at the stumps, always on the attack. His leap before the right arm wheeled over was superb in poise. Never did he send down a defensive ball. He would have been too proud. "He tried," A.C. MacLaren told me, "to get a wicket every ball. Honest Tom!" Let us remember him by those two words of MacLaren's tribute -- Honest Tom.

Victor Trumper

It is futile to ask who was the greatest batsman? There are different orders of greatness. Talent, even genius, is conditioned by the material circumstances in which it is developed. Victor Trumper was the embodiment of gallantry as he made his runs. He was a chivalrous batsman, nothing mean or discourteous in any of his movements or intentions at the wicket. "He had no style", wrote C. B. Fry of him, "but he was all style". But not by counting Victor's runs, not by looking at any records, will you get the slightest idea of Trumper's glorious cricket. You might as well count the notes of the music of Mozart.

Sydney Barnes

Most cricketers and students of the game belonging to the period in which S.F. Barnes played were agreed that he was the bowler of the century. Australians as well as English voted him unanimously the greatest. Clem Hill, the famous Australian left-handed batsman, told me that on a perfect wicket Barnes could swing the new ball in and out very late, could spin from the ground, pitch on the leg stump and miss the off. Barnes had a splendid upright action, right arm straight over. He ran on easy strides, not a penn'orth of energy wasted. He fingered a cricket ball sensitively, like a violinist his fiddle. He always attacked.

Don Bradman

Sir Donald Bradman (hereinafter to be named Bradman or The Don), must be called the most masterful and prolific maker of runs the game has so far known. He was, in short, a great batsman. Critics have argued that he was mechanical. So is a majestically flying aeroplane. The difference between Bradman and, say, Victor Trumper as batsmen, was in fact the difference between an aeroplane and a swallow in flight. Discussing him entirely from the point of view of a writer on the game, I am happy to say that he was for me a constant spur to ideas. A newspaper column couldn't contain him. He was, as far as a cricketer can be, a genius.

Perhaps we can focus more on the old and forgotten players?