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View Full Version : Anyone know Shafiul and Rubels story


fishyguy
October 13, 2010, 08:22 PM
How were these guys discovered?

riankhan
October 13, 2010, 08:35 PM
How were these guys discovered?

Rubel was found from GP Pacer Hunt program
Shafiul was found from similar kind of program, but organized by BD cricketers asso.

Thats all I know. But I read a bit detailed about Rubel somewhere, and currently digging for it

IanW
October 13, 2010, 09:34 PM
http://www.banglacricket.com/alochona/showthread.php?t=24093&highlight=pacer+hunt See there ;)

lamisa
October 14, 2010, 02:09 AM
but is the gp pacer hunt still on?i mean does this event take place on a regular basis?

riankhan
October 14, 2010, 06:52 AM
but is the gp pacer hunt still on?i mean does this event take place on a regular basis?

Its off now a days lill sis...:)
Hope the initiatives will be taken through district/decentralized cricket bodies

Aritro
October 14, 2010, 07:05 AM
A pacer hunt would not be neccessary except as a marketting gimmick if we had decent talent-identification systems.

Nevertheless, I'm delighted with the way these two lads have stood up in this series. Both were occasionally woeful over in England but they've shown great character to bounce back in this one. I think both have enough in their locker to be decent low 30s averaging international cricketers.

Not sure what sort of bowler Rubel's going to be. With his slingly accent and the above average pace he showed early on, I think we all assumed that he'd simply keep getting faster and be the sort of bowler we've never had before - someone who can arch his back, hit the deck hard and really hurry and really hurry the batsman before he's through with his shot.

Not sure whether that'll ever happen though. He's definitely much slower now than he was 18 months ago, for whatever reason, and I wouldn't assume he's neccessarily got it in him to be anything better than an 83-85mph bowler.

IMO he'd make a decent, moderate paced swing bowler who keeps a reasonably full length. He still needs to do something about his habit of bowling with the seam in an almost horizontal position, which is something that robs him of movement off the pitch, but he seems to have the happy knack of bowling those late inswingers that really tail in and dip in a batsman before they have the time to adjust. If he can do that consistently with the new ball then we might really have ourselves a weapon.

The movement he already seems to have the ability to get with the old ball could also be invaluable to us given our longstanding problem with having seamers who are completely ineffectual when the shine comes off the ball (with the odd Shahadat spell excepted).

Shafiul is a bowler I like for a whole number of reasons, but mainly his cleverness and ingenuity. He's probably the best, most accurate bowler of a bouncer we've ever had and knows how to use it. He's also got the ability to move it off the seam and he's been busy developing two different kinds of slower balls that at different speeds (one of them at around 110-115 and the other at 120-125) which I think will turn into an excellent deceptive weapon for him.

I don't want to get too carried away, however, as both have a lot of work to do before we can start talking about them as being anything other than two bowlers with awful international records.

IanW
October 15, 2010, 12:25 AM
A pacer hunt would not be neccessary except as a marketting gimmick if we had decent talent-identification systems..


Sorry if this is going in too hard, but the Bangladesh talent identification system is pretty bloody good. Look at the 2006 and 2007 youth teams, and you'll see a lot of names you recognise today.

The development level and maturity level of a Rubel, a Shaiful or a Mahmadullah is also something to be happy with.

The Pacer Hunt was a great idea - it's cheap, as it needs a speed gun. two blokes and a box of balls ... and your talent spotting sytstem is never good enough to find everyone from the back blocks, and frankly while the locals might know that Ali is quick, they dont know if he's 80 mph or 90mph.

Ian

lamisa
October 15, 2010, 04:38 AM
^^ditto!

Aritro
October 16, 2010, 04:24 AM
Sorry if this is going in too hard, but the Bangladesh talent identification system is pretty bloody good. Look at the 2006 and 2007 youth teams, and you'll see a lot of names you recognise today.

The development level and maturity level of a Rubel, a Shaiful or a Mahmadullah is also something to be happy with.

The Pacer Hunt was a great idea - it's cheap, as it needs a speed gun. two blokes and a box of balls ... and your talent spotting sytstem is never good enough to find everyone from the back blocks, and frankly while the locals might know that Ali is quick, they dont know if he's 80 mph or 90mph.

Ian

It's been well acknowledged on this forum over the years that talent identification is a nightmare in our country and that a lot of talent slips through the net. Dhaka has a prestigious school competition, albeit one that comes with its failings, and I gather Chittagong does as well, but there's a huge volume of young players not playing organised cricket. There's also not enough elite junior comps.

Here's Jamie Siddons' brief take on it:

Considered by some to be one of the finest batsmen in Australia's Sheffield Shield first-class cricket competition not to receive a regular international spot, he received said the problem was getting the best out of the talent that did exist in the under-developed Asian country (http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Asian+country) .

"Talent identification is not easy because infrastructure is an issue in terms of facilities and organised competition."

I hear you re: the 2006 and 2007 teams, they were undoubtedly good youth teams, but the fact that they're household names has a lot to do with the fact that they were the first generation of young Bangladeshi cricketers to receive proper coaching from qualified people from a young age, which put them at a massive advantage compared to the Hannan Sarkars of the world.

But I think it's worth considering whether those teams could have been even better, or whether they could have produced another Shakib and Tamim, if we'd been able to develop players chosen from the full pool of young cricketing enthusiasts in the country, rather than few who have access to organised cricket.

That said, it is, in hindsight, probably more of an infrastructure issue than strictly a talent identification one.

As for the GP pace-hunt, yes, I was a bit hasty in dismissing it out of hand. It does have its merits because of its capacity to throw up a gem from somewhere unexpected - gems that are more likely to have been missed by the system because of the failures of infrastructure I mentioned above.