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Zeeshan
May 5, 2011, 12:14 AM
Last thing good humored Doc could do was tempt a thread opening wh--- with such a dare.

Yes, but today's Bangladesh is not predicated to being a homeland for a particular religious group. That label can only be applied to Pakistan and Israel. So al Furqaan was correct. Sorry - I am digressing from the topic but today's Bangladesh belongs to all citizens be they Hindus, Muslims, Buddhists, Christians and what not. Feel free to start a topic on this. I wonder how quickly Kazi's law will be invoked there.

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However, let's generalize the topic. What does it really mean to be a Bangladeshi? Last time mona got into a knickerbocker (c) Razabda and there are some flaming conservatives in Bangladesh who would leer and sneer as demographics who fall into her category as ABCD or other terms thinking they -rather we- are somehow misguided.

I for one DO NOT believe in blindly sticking to cultural traditions like Ekushe February, taking my shoes off and put a garland on Shahid Minar. Simply that's not my personality. Not because I have some anathema to that but even in US, I am against doing something to stick to cultural norms. Does it make me less of a Bangladeshi?

I for one, do not adhere to the constitutional religion of Bangladesh. Islam. And if I had my way, I would separate the "church" from the "state" so to speak. Does it make me less of a Bangladeshi?

I for one did not think that it was a heinous act by some misguided or warped or whatever BD 'supporter's to wave the Pakistani flag before the eve of 26th March during World Cup because in my personal philosophy human free will - as streamlined by societal legal issues- has precedence over mass beliefs. Does it make me a razakar or for that matter make me someone who doesn't respect the freedom fighters?

Am I less of a Bangladeshi just because I stay in US? Had I stayed in Dhaka, would all of a sudden I'd be earning billions to eradicate country's poverty? The fact that I don't live in BD yet support BD team dishing out advices, opinions, suggestions left n right all of a sudden makes me a hypocrite? Does it make me less of a Bangladeshi?

Do I really have to be a lungi wearing, bodna carrying, five times praying, eelish loving, green and red waving patriot to be called an "official" Bangladeshi? Does the fact that I am a dual citizen gives me less rights than people who actually live in the country, going about their mundane affairs, instead of doing a jackshit to improve the country at every instant somehow make them better than me?

What does it REALLY mean to be a Bangladeshi? Do Bangladesh really look after minorities right? Rawls would turn over his grave to see that a country labeled with Democratic Republic tramples over the minority rights of atheists, gays, Hindus or whoever do not stick to societal norms or customs.

It's not about being a rebel but sticking out for basic individual rights and telling the fellow person that his and the masses' beliefs, rights, customs should not be in any way somehow the ultimate arbiter for the rest of people.

I am all for traditions and values and other glitters AS LONG AS IT DOESN'T infringe on my personal rights and is not shoved down my throat. And once again to irk tonoy with my "pseudo-zen" stories which is "tad bit annoying" here is a story that highlights what happens to people who blindly follow tradition.

When the spiritual teacher and his disciples began their evening meditation, the cat who lived in the monastery made such noise that it distracted them. So the teacher ordered that the cat be tied up during the evening practice. Years later, when the teacher died, the cat continued to be tied up during the meditation session. And when the cat eventually died, another cat was brought to the monastery and tied up. Centuries later, learned descendants of the spiritual teacher wrote scholarly treatises about the religious significance of tying up a cat for meditation practice.http://users.rider.edu/~suler/zenstory/ritualcat.html (http://users.rider.edu/%7Esuler/zenstory/ritualcat.html)

So what does it really mean to be a Bangladeshi? Take it away.

bujhee kom
May 5, 2011, 03:40 AM
Hhhhmmm...chintaar bishoi...

goru
May 5, 2011, 07:46 AM
Do you currently hold a Bangladeshi passport or have other means of proving citizenship of Bangladesh?



Supporting Brazil in the FIFA WC or mastering the "surra de bunda" does not automatically make you a Brazillian.

Eating sushi all the time or yelling "Godjiraaaa" everytime you see something big does not automatically make you Japanese.

If you are American, protesting wars or wanting to ban guns does not make you Un-American.

If you are Italian, disliking pizza or pasta does not make you Un-Italian.


All of this other crap is irrelevant... the basic question is, do you hold a passport or proof of citizenship?


Now, "What does it mean to act like a Bangladeshi?" is an entirely different and subjective question...

Rubu
May 5, 2011, 08:05 AM
I think what you are trying to do is, define what is good and what is bad Bangladeshi. And that is complicated.

There is not too much complication in deciding what it means to be a Bangladeshi: Being born in Bangladesh, or having Bangladeshi parents.

(I do not know if Bangladesh provides citizenship to children born in Bangladesh to foreign parents. Basically, is it US style or UK style? Interested in knowing).

samircreep
May 5, 2011, 09:04 AM
Do you currently hold a Bangladeshi passport or have other means of proving citizenship of Bangladesh?



Supporting Brazil in the FIFA WC or mastering the "surra de bunda" does not automatically make you a Brazillian.

Eating sushi all the time or yelling "Godjiraaaa" everytime you see something big does not automatically make you Japanese.

If you are American, protesting wars or wanting to ban guns does not make you Un-American.

If you are Italian, disliking pizza or pasta does not make you Un-Italian.


All of this other crap is irrelevant... the basic question is, do you hold a passport or proof of citizenship?


Now, "What does it mean to act like a Bangladeshi?" is an entirely different and subjective question...


But goru, if you are a born and raised Bangladeshi and have moved in to canada and have received the canadian passport, are you now canadian (assumig you no longer have/use you bd passport?) and no longer bangladeshi?

roman
May 5, 2011, 11:39 AM
It depends on how you feel, how passionate you are about Bangladesh. Passport, citizenships and all that are just a piece of paper.

goru
May 5, 2011, 11:57 AM
But goru, if you are a born and raised Bangladeshi and have moved in to canada and have received the canadian passport, are you now canadian (assumig you no longer have/use you bd passport?) and no longer bangladeshi?


I dunno much about dual citizenship laws, but I suppose you have to check whether you can renew your BD passport or obtain a new BD passport. If you are not permitted to do either, that means you are no longer considered "Bangladeshi" ... any "Bangladeshi" should be able to legally obtain a Bangladeshi passport if they desire one.

goru
May 5, 2011, 01:24 PM
(I do not know if Bangladesh provides citizenship to children born in Bangladesh to foreign parents. Basically, is it US style or UK style? Interested in knowing).

http://www.unhcr.org/refworld/country,,NATLEGBOD,,BGD,,3ae6b51f10,0.html

As far as I can tell from that, the answer is no, i.e. it's UK style.

Jadukor
May 5, 2011, 10:04 PM
I think being less of a Bangladeshi starts when there is a feeling of indifference towards whatever good or bad happens to Bangladesh. The lessening of "Bangladeshiness" is a gradual process:
1. First you start to distance yourself from the culture... eg celebrating Pohela Boishakh, reading deshi books, listening to deshi music...
2. the next phase begins when you start avoiding Bangladeshi news paper and political developments by simply thinking there is no point...
3. then you start to distancing yourself from the people by constantly looking down on other bangladeshies as being murkho...
4. last stage you replace your bangladeshi passport with another

Bancan
May 5, 2011, 10:38 PM
I think being less of a Bangladeshi starts when there is a feeling of indifference towards whatever good or bad happens to Bangladesh. The lessening of "Bangladeshiness" is a gradual process:
1. First you start to distance yourself from the culture... eg celebrating Pohela Boishakh, reading deshi books, listening to deshi music...
2. the next phase begins when you start avoiding Bangladeshi news paper and political developments by simply thinking there is no point...
3. then you start to distancing yourself from the people by constantly looking down on other bangladeshies as being murkho...
4. last stage you replace your bangladeshi passport with another


I completely disagree. I dont think I need to do anything specific to feel or be Bangladeshi. I dont do any of the things above and I feel like I am Bangladeshi. Its whats in your heart rather than your actions that make you Bangladeshi.

Night_wolf
May 5, 2011, 10:58 PM
as simple as i can make it-No matter where u live or which nationality u are if u have unconditional love for Bangladesh then i'll consider u as a Bangladeshi....many people living in BD in my view are not bangladeshi...example:Golam Azam

Naimul_Hd
May 5, 2011, 11:14 PM
I think being less of a Bangladeshi starts when there is a feeling of indifference towards whatever good or bad happens to Bangladesh. The lessening of "Bangladeshiness" is a gradual process:
1. First you start to distance yourself from the culture... eg celebrating Pohela Boishakh, reading deshi books, listening to deshi music...
2. the next phase begins when you start avoiding Bangladeshi news paper and political developments by simply thinking there is no point...
3. then you start to distancing yourself from the people by constantly looking down on other bangladeshies as being murkho...
4. last stage you replace your bangladeshi passport with another

How does a foreign passport make me less Bangladeshi ? I consider foreign passport as a tool for living and working in that specific country, nothing more. I have already invested enough money and time in Australia, so i am fully entitled to enjoy whatever facilities it may provide after getting passport. Even after getting Australian passport, i will proudly say to people i am Bangladeshi !

now, whether i am a good Bangladeshi or bad Bangladeshi is whole lot different issue.

goru
May 6, 2011, 03:35 AM
I consider foreign passport as a tool for living and working in that specific country, nothing more.

Note that a foreign passport is not just a "tool for living and working" in that country. There are plenty of other things in countries like US, UK, Aus, Can, NZ that let you do the same, like work permits and permanent residence visas. A passport is more than that - it's evidence that you've pledged allegiance to that nation and loyalty to its people. And, depending on the country, it can also mean that you may be required to defend the country, and the country may try you for treasonous acts.

Sohel
May 6, 2011, 03:49 AM
Well, for me it means the following (in order):

1) The indigenous peoples born in what today is recognized as the People's Republic of Bangladesh and their descendants living elsewhere.

2) The Bangali majority born in what today is recognized as the People's Republic of Bangladesh and their descendants living elsewhere.

3) The non-indigenous, non-Bangali population born in what today is recognized as the People's Republic of Bangladesh and their descendants living elsewhere. That includes the small number of Biharis who have gone against the majority of their community, and accepted Bangladeshi citizenship and Bangladesh.

4) Any duly naturalized citizen of Bangladesh regardless of national origin.

Jadukor
May 6, 2011, 04:39 AM
How does a foreign passport make me less Bangladeshi ? I consider foreign passport as a tool for living and working in that specific country, nothing more. I have already invested enough money and time in Australia, so i am fully entitled to enjoy whatever facilities it may provide after getting passport. Even after getting Australian passport, i will proudly say to people i am Bangladeshi !

now, whether i am a good Bangladeshi or bad Bangladeshi is whole lot different issue.

Look let me just say that its my personal take only and i mean no offence. I consider a work permit, permanent residency as a tool for living and working abroad. I do not believe you need to trade your citizenship to work anywhere and I personally would not trade my Bangladeshi passport for any other country for any amount of benefits. I am happy to sacrifice the additional benefits associated with having a foreign passport of a developed country and I am proud of holding my green non digital bangladeshi passport even though it sometimes gives me a lot of hassles at the airport. A passport is the official documentation of my nationality and I feel happy to know that if i died right now.. the authorities would be able to know i am a bangladeshi citizen and there would not be any problems transferring my body back to Dhaka.
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Naimul_Hd
May 6, 2011, 05:10 AM
Look let me just say that its my personal take only and i mean no offence. I consider a work permit, permanent residency as a tool for living and working abroad. I do not believe you need to trade your citizenship to work anywhere and I personally would not trade my Bangladeshi passport for any other country for any amount of benefits. I am happy to sacrifice the additional benefits associated with having a foreign passport of a developed country and I am proud of holding my green non digital bangladeshi passport even though it sometimes gives me a lot of hassles at the airport. A passport is the official documentation of my nationality and I feel happy to know that if i died right now.. the authorities would be able to know i am a bangladeshi citizen and there would not be any problems transferring my body back to Dhaka.
<o:p></o:p>

No offence taken bro. I was just wanted to know your logic/reasoning behind your point, nothing else. :)

samircreep
May 6, 2011, 06:25 AM
I dunno much about dual citizenship laws, but I suppose you have to check whether you can renew your BD passport or obtain a new BD passport. If you are not permitted to do either, that means you are no longer considered "Bangladeshi" ... any "Bangladeshi" should be able to legally obtain a Bangladeshi passport if they desire one.


Most of my friends carry 2 passports. One BD, one western passport. Are they still considered BD by your definition? Are they any less Bangladeshi than me who has only one passport but is away from the country 6 months every year?

Nafi
May 6, 2011, 06:40 AM
Well, for me it means the following (in order):

1) The indigenous peoples born in what today is recognized as the People's Republic of Bangladesh and their descendants living elsewhere.

2) The Bangali majority born in what today is recognized as the People's Republic of Bangladesh and their descendants living elsewhere.

3) The non-indigenous, non-Bangali population born in what today is recognized as the People's Republic of Bangladesh and their descendants living elsewhere. That includes the small number of Biharis who have gone against the majority of their community, and accepted Bangladeshi citizenship and Bangladesh.

4) Any duly naturalized citizen of Bangladesh regardless of national origin.

Agreed

goru
May 6, 2011, 08:07 AM
Most of my friends carry 2 passports. One BD, one western passport. Are they still considered BD by your definition? Are they any less Bangladeshi than me who has only one passport but is away from the country 6 months every year?

I dunno why you keep repeating your question.

If they hold a valid BD passport, or they can obtain a valid passport if they desire one, they are Bangladeshi.

If you can obtain a valid BD passport, then so are you.

There is no "more" or "less" Bangladeshi. You either are or not.

samircreep
May 6, 2011, 09:11 AM
I dunno why you keep repeating your question.

If they hold a valid BD passport, or they can obtain a valid passport if they desire one, they are Bangladeshi.

If you can obtain a valid BD passport, then so are you.

There is no "more" or "less" Bangladeshi. You either are or not.

I repeat, cos you don't answer.

Let's try to spoon feed you a bit more:

When a person has two passports, which nationality is he? Or can you be two nationalities at the same time?

Naimul_Hd
May 6, 2011, 10:13 AM
I repeat, cos you don't answer.

Let's try to spoon feed you a bit more:

When a person has two passports, which nationality is he? Or can you be two nationalities at the same time?

I think most people do mistake thinking "NATIONALITY" is the same thing as "CITIZENSHIP" !!! Actually its not. These two are two different things. It will be clear if you read following quotation.

The word citizenship (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citizenship) is often used in a different sense from nationality. The most common distinguishing feature of citizenship is that citizens have the right to participate in the political (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Politics) life of the state, such as by voting (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voting) or standing for election (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Candidate). The term national can include both citizens and non-citizens.

In several areas of the world, the term nationality can be defined based on ethnicity, as well as cultural and family-based self-determination rather than on relations with a state or current government. For example, there are people who would say that they are Kurds (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kurds), i.e., of Kurdish nationality, even though no such Kurdish sovereign state (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sovereign_state) exists at least at this time in history.

In the context of former Soviet Union (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soviet_Union) and former Yugoslavia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SFRY), nationality is often used as translation of the Russian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_language) and Serbo-Croatian (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serbo-Croatian) terms (народность/narodnost) used for ethnic groups (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethnic_group) and local affiliations within those (former) states.

Even today the Russian Federation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_Federation), as an example, consists of various people whose nationality is other than Russian, but who are considered to be Russian subjects and comply with the laws of the federation. Similarly, the term "nationalities of China (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nationalities_of_China)" refers to cultural groups in China. [Source (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nationality)]

goru
May 6, 2011, 10:14 AM
When a person has two passports, which nationality is he? Or can you be two nationalities at the same time?

My point is clear: If you can legally obtain a valid Bangladesh passport right now (regardless of what other passports you have), then you are a Bangladeshi.

goru
May 6, 2011, 10:25 AM
I think most people do mistake thinking "NATIONALITY" is the same thing as "CITIZENSHIP" !!! Actually its not. These two are two different things. It will be clear if you read following quotation.

In that case, what exactly is a "Bangladeshi national" ... ?

Does "Bangladeshi" refer to a "Bangladeshi citizen" or a "Bangladeshi national" ... ?

Naimul_Hd
May 6, 2011, 10:30 AM
In that case, what exactly is a "Bangladeshi national" ... ?

Does "Bangladeshi" refer to a "Bangladeshi citizen" or a "Bangladeshi national", or both ... ?

As far as i am concerned, "Bangladeshi" is a nationality. It covers both Citizen and Non-Citizen.

Beamer
May 6, 2011, 10:38 AM
I can relate to what Zeeshan is saying, though I can never articulate it the way he can. Remember Z, before you are a Bangladeshi, or a Muslim, or a Bangali, or a Hindu - you are an individual first. I think individualism trumps all other categories that can be associated with a person belonging to any group, ethnicity, religion, culture or nationality.

al Furqaan
May 6, 2011, 11:43 AM
Well, for me it means the following (in order):

1) The indigenous peoples born in what today is recognized as the People's Republic of Bangladesh and their descendants living elsewhere.

2) The Bangali majority born in what today is recognized as the People's Republic of Bangladesh and their descendants living elsewhere.

3) The non-indigenous, non-Bangali population born in what today is recognized as the People's Republic of Bangladesh and their descendants living elsewhere. That includes the small number of Biharis who have gone against the majority of their community, and accepted Bangladeshi citizenship and Bangladesh.

4) Any duly naturalized citizen of Bangladesh regardless of national origin.

i am included under #2 "their descendents living (and born) elsewhere". but my nani (born in Delhi) doesn't fall under any category except #4. but i guess 4 implies that she is not ethnically bengali (which she is).

AsifTheManRahman
May 6, 2011, 03:33 PM
It means nothing, nothing at all. All this rambling on internet forums, all this support for the Bangladesh cricket team - useless, all useless I tell you! Cuz everybody dies but not everybody lives.

AsifTheManRahman
May 6, 2011, 03:39 PM
I can relate to what Zeeshan is saying, though I can never articulate it the way he can. Remember Z, before you are a Bangladeshi, or a Muslim, or a Bangali, or a Hindu - you are an individual first. I think individualism trumps all other categories that can be associated with a person belonging to any group, ethnicity, religion, culture or nationality.
I dream of the day when there will be one world, one race, one citizenship. When an interracial relationship will involve not two Earthlings but an Earthling and a blue-skinned alien babe from Pandora.

Zeeshan
May 6, 2011, 03:40 PM
I can relate to what Zeeshan is saying, though I can never articulate it the way he can. Remember Z, before you are a Bangladeshi, or a Muslim, or a Bangali, or a Hindu - you are an individual first. I think individualism trumps all other categories that can be associated with a person belonging to any group, ethnicity, religion, culture or nationality.

Pott (Post of the thread) made me cry.

Zeeshan
May 6, 2011, 03:42 PM
It means nothing, nothing at all. All this rambling on internet forums, all this support for the Bangladesh cricket team - useless, all useless I tell you! Cuz everybody dies but not everybody lives.

Time to bring barb-of-the-day p'aps?

Haru-party
May 6, 2011, 04:30 PM
the answer is simple BLOOD. bangladesh is in ur blood. so u r a bangladeshi even if u hate bangladesh.

Sohel
May 6, 2011, 07:29 PM
i am included under #2 "their descendents living (and born) elsewhere". but my nani (born in Delhi) doesn't fall under any category except #4. but i guess 4 implies that she is not ethnically bengali (which she is).

If your Nani's parents were (what is now) Bangladeshi Bangali, she's Bangladeshi in my book. If her parents are Indian Bangalis not originally from what is known as Bangladesh today, then you'd be right.

I consider Indian Bangalis originally from Bangladesh ("Bangals"), and their children to be Bangladeshi also. That includes Tagore (Kushtia), Amartya Sen (Dhaka), JC Bose (Bikrampur), Ravi Shankar (Noakhali) and his daughters Anoushka Shankar & Norah Jones, and many of their top writers, musicians, filmmakers, athletes, actors/actresses and politicians. I consider multiracial folks like Rep. Hansen Clarke (Detroit, Michigan), Jawed Karim and Rhona Mitra (of Underworld, Rise of the Lycans) to be Bangladeshi also.

bujhee kom
May 6, 2011, 11:07 PM
Accha bhais, since we are speaking of BD passport, have you guys got the BD digitally readable new passport yet? I need to get one at the consulate asap. do you know how much it would cost me and how much rush production(meaning how fast) can I get of one of these new passporte?

Also how long is each book of passport valid bhais? 5 years X 2 if you renewd it right? Right? Please let me know! Thank you and salaam!

bujhee kom
May 6, 2011, 11:27 PM
Hello bhais....apnader kachey bhalo proshno korley in exchange bhalo kichu asha kora jai naa....keu ashlen naa amakey help kortey...kintoo jodi ashe boltaam, asoon amra eke oporer pacha-e koshey lathu mari, bitkali kori, eke oporke kada/mud churey mari, ami nishchit etokkhoney 10-15 joner moto minimum apnader ekhaney joro hoten...apnader kachey, ami jatir kachey proshno rakhchi, kothai aaj amder Bangali Jatir, Shadhin Bangldesher Bibek? Ami aaj jantey chai, boloon ke amader baba? Who is my dadddy?

Naimul_Hd
May 6, 2011, 11:50 PM
Accha bhais, since we are speaking of BD passport, have you guys got the BD digitally readable new passport yet? I need to get one at the consulate asap. do you know how much it would cost me and how much rush production(meaning how fast) can I get of one of these new passporte?

Also how long is each book of passport valid bhais? 5 years X 2 if you renewd it right? Right? Please let me know! Thank you and salaam!

bk da, apnar moto buddhi man manush jodi ei type er quesion kore tahole ki hoy ?? Bangladeshi Embassy in USA er website e gelei to pawa jay !! thak tao apni jokhon amader kache jante chaichen e...Here you go !!

For new passport:

Money order / cashier’s check of US$ 110.00 payable to the Embassy of Bangladesh for Regular Service (delivery after 15 working days) and US$165.00 for Urgent service (delivery after 3 working days). Its validity is 5 years.

For renewal:

Ordinary: US$ 22.00 per year (delivery after 3 working days). US$ 110 for five years renewal.
Urgent: $33.00 per year (delivery next day). US$ 165 for five years renewal.

Links:
Passport Information (http://www.bdembassyusa.org/Passport.asp)

Passport application form and information (http://www.bdembassyusa.org/Passportapplication.pdf)

Passport renewal Form and Information (http://www.bdembassyusa.org/passportrenewal.pdf)

Khushi !??? :)

Naimul_Hd
May 7, 2011, 01:28 AM
ki go dada, ekta dhonnobad porjonto dilen na !! :(









:-p

AsifTheManRahman
May 7, 2011, 07:47 AM
ki go dada, ekta dhonnobad porjonto dilen na !! :(

Ekhon jodi bolten ashun amra eke oporer pachay laathi mari, kada chhuri, bitlami kori, tahole dekhten thiki BK bhai aro 10/15 jon shangopango niye hajir howe jeto.
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Naimul_Hd
May 7, 2011, 07:52 AM
BK da :autlaal::out:

:lol::lol::lol:

Alchemist
May 7, 2011, 10:34 AM
Prologue: On the eve of 13th December, 1971, Captain Mohiuddin Jahangir from sector 7, Mukti Bahini asked himself for the umpteenth time “Why are we fighting this war? What is this Bangladesh? Why am I fighting for this country when it’s not even recognized by the rest of the world and why I’ve left my family behind for this? When can I see my family again?”

Within a few hours, these philosophical thoughts full of emotions were gone as he was busy moving his troops over Mahananda river and to find a suitable place to camp at Rehaichar (Chapai Nawabgonj district) before Dawn. He intended to destroy one of the light machine gun bunkers of the Pakistan Army there and crawled towards it. He managed to come closer to the bunker and charged grenade to it. But he was fired from another bunker and as a result, he was immediately shot dead.

Captain Mohiuddin Jahangir was awarded the highest recognition of bravery in Bangladesh for his gallantry, Bir Shrestho.

If you were born in a Muslim/Hindu/Christian family, are you entitled to call yourself a Muslim/Hindu/ Christian without practicing the religion? Interestingly, for paperwork/official purposes, the answer is yes. Can you really link your birth (which you had no control over) to abstract ideas like religion or nationalism (which is linked to your personal belief system)?

What does it mean to be a Bangladeshi? Zeeshan, thank you for this thread. Thank you so much. While living in Australia for the last 8 years, I’ve asked myself this question million times. Every time Bangladesh cricket team accepted defeat, I asked myself this question. When they managed to beat stronger teams, I asked this question. Every time Bangladeshi citizens voted for the incompetent, evil and ruthless politicians at national elections, I asked myself this question. And every time, I found my answer in the lives (or deaths) of fearless people like Captain Mohiuddin Jahangir, who sacrificed their lives, just to become Bangladeshi.

I’ve met a lot of people in my life, who just think, nationalism is a kind of fascism. To them, the physical boundaries don’t matter. When they talk nationalism/fascism, they talk about Germany/Italy from WW2. Unfortunately, they don’t see the differences between the history of Bangladesh and these countries. These people can reap the benefits of globalization pretty easily without any moral dilemma. When I listen to this, I wonder, why millions of East Pakistanis died to become Bangladeshis?

It’s not healthy to live in the past and ignore the present. However, one must understand the role of history to have a better idea about present.

To understand Bangladesh or the concept of being a Bangladeshi, without understanding the historical events behind it, to my opinion is meaningless. One must understand the ideological foundation of Bangladesh (before her independence) which created the country, before going deep into this topic, IMHO.

The four pillars of the foundation were: nationalism, socialism, secularism, and democracy. Majority of the people wanted a welfare state where social justice and economic freedom for the masses would take priority and there’ll be fairness in everything. It was a dream for a better life, for everyone. Unfortunately, since ’71, all our leadership failed big times to achieve this as most of them were/are only interested in their own benefits while robbing the innocent.

I’ll like to conclude with a little prayer. May Allah give us the wisdom to pick the right path, the ability to help the poor or who’re in need and the courage to fight against all kinds of evil. Ameen.

AsifTheManRahman
May 7, 2011, 10:48 AM
On a serious note, I think the definition is pretty simple. You are Bangladeshi if you pledge to damage yourself mentally and physically and risk the well being of your family, career and personal and social lives in general to watch, support and follow the Bangladesh cricket team, while being the proud author of >= 5000 meaningless posts on BanglaCricket.com.
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bujhee kom
May 8, 2011, 01:37 AM
ki go dada, ekta dhonnobad porjonto dilen na !! :(

:-p

Ekhon jodi bolten ashun amra eke oporer pachay laathi mari, kada chhuri, bitlami kori, tahole dekhten thiki BK bhai aro 10/15 jon shangopango niye hajir howe jeto.
<br />Posted via BC Mobile Edition (Blackberry)

BK da :autlaal::out:

:lol::lol::lol:

Heheheheheh...bhais, ami ektu ghumiey porechilaamm...ami ghumaley ghotokkocher moto behoosh hoey naak dekey ghumai...thank you my dearest dearest go0od boy Huda bhai, :big_hug:!!...very nice!! Ohjh lovely lovely!! Passport ta update koira rakhi re bhai...diinkaal kharap..Kokhon Allah daak dei, kokhon kiamot ashey bola jai na re bhais! Allah Malik!


Ohho P.S. Daanilkaa to Asif bhai and Huda bhai! Hehehhe...Bambino ala Baboshkaa ?? Ke paso? Muchos dineros? Dos Chicko del Carbone und rojas plus beans and grweens!


O dada go, FTP khelchi ajkey ami bujechen, khub bedhorok dholai dicchi ek chagol-er team-ke, I mean amar batsmen-ra, real Baper beta, eishob amader BD national team-er moto dhojo naa, amar team-er naam written in golden letters in the history of FTP..."dhaka mental hospital" ...ajkey Inshallah jitbo money hochche!


Khela kintoo besh bhaloi jom,ey utheche dadas!!


PS> Match Update: Jitey gesi bhais jitey gesi...Mentaloos won!!

Nafi
May 8, 2011, 07:00 AM
Well are there any people in this forum, who have indigenous backgrounds?
<br />Posted via BC Mobile Edition (Blackberry)

Sohel
May 8, 2011, 08:14 AM
I do. My maternal great great grandmother was a Tripura nobleborn from Khagr'hachhar'hi by the name of Srimati Madhabilata Chaudhurani. She took the name Beghum Ayesha Chaudhury after converting to Islam and marrying my maternal great great grandfather Khan Bahadur Muhammad Ali Chaudhury, a Bangali land owner and British @$$-kisser from Laksmipur, Noakhali. Beghum Ayesha was related to the Burmans, as in SD Burman (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SD_Burman), of Comilla.

My mom has distinct Southeast Asian features and some of her cousins look completely Burmese or Thai. Morshed Khan, the former Foreign Minister from Chittagong, is a distant cousin of theirs. They probably have Marma or Rakhaine blood from Arakan, Burma.

Land owning and merchant families east of the Meghna river used to marry like that back then. Incentivized no doubt by the prospect of converting indigenous nobility to Islam and grabbing their land afterwards.

bujhee kom
May 9, 2011, 07:52 PM
Prologue: On the eve of 13th December, 1971, Captain Mohiuddin Jahangir from sector 7, Mukti Bahini asked himself for the umpteenth time “Why are we fighting this war? What is this Bangladesh? Why am I fighting for this country when it’s not even recognized by the rest of the world and why I’ve left my family behind for this? When can I see my family again?”

Within a few hours, these philosophical thoughts full of emotions were gone as he was busy moving his troops over Mahananda river and to find a suitable place to camp at Rehaichar (Chapai Nawabgonj district) before Dawn. He intended to destroy one of the light machine gun bunkers of the Pakistan Army there and crawled towards it. He managed to come closer to the bunker and charged grenade to it. But he was fired from another bunker and as a result, he was immediately shot dead.

Captain Mohiuddin Jahangir was awarded the highest recognition of bravery in Bangladesh for his gallantry, Bir Shrestho.

If you were born in a Muslim/Hindu/Christian family, are you entitled to call yourself a Muslim/Hindu/ Christian without practicing the religion? Interestingly, for paperwork/official purposes, the answer is yes. Can you really link your birth (which you had no control over) to abstract ideas like religion or nationalism (which is linked to your personal belief system)?

What does it mean to be a Bangladeshi? Zeeshan, thank you for this thread. Thank you so much. While living in Australia for the last 8 years, I’ve asked myself this question million times. Every time Bangladesh cricket team accepted defeat, I asked myself this question. When they managed to beat stronger teams, I asked this question. Every time Bangladeshi citizens voted for the incompetent, evil and ruthless politicians at national elections, I asked myself this question. And every time, I found my answer in the lives (or deaths) of fearless people like Captain Mohiuddin Jahangir, who sacrificed their lives, just to become Bangladeshi.

I’ve met a lot of people in my life, who just think, nationalism is a kind of fascism. To them, the physical boundaries don’t matter. When they talk nationalism/fascism, they talk about Germany/Italy from WW2. Unfortunately, they don’t see the differences between the history of Bangladesh and these countries. These people can reap the benefits of globalization pretty easily without any moral dilemma. When I listen to this, I wonder, why millions of East Pakistanis died to become Bangladeshis?

It’s not healthy to live in the past and ignore the present. However, one must understand the role of history to have a better idea about present.

To understand Bangladesh or the concept of being a Bangladeshi, without understanding the historical events behind it, to my opinion is meaningless. One must understand the ideological foundation of Bangladesh (before her independence) which created the country, before going deep into this topic, IMHO.

The four pillars of the foundation were: nationalism, socialism, secularism, and democracy. Majority of the people wanted a welfare state where social justice and economic freedom for the masses would take priority and there’ll be fairness in everything. It was a dream for a better life, for everyone. Unfortunately, since ’71, all our leadership failed big times to achieve this as most of them were/are only interested in their own benefits while robbing the innocent.

I’ll like to conclude with a little prayer. May Allah give us the wisdom to pick the right path, the ability to help the poor or who’re in need and the courage to fight against all kinds of evil. Ameen.

Top post by my dear Alchemist bhai! You are very admirable bhai!

Beamer
May 10, 2011, 11:25 AM
I actually hate Robindra songit ( not a dig at Sohel for the thread ), and it puts me to sleep. The slow pan panani is excrutiating. Does that make me any less of a Bangali ( deshi )?

Electrequiem
June 10, 2011, 12:39 PM
Bump. Couldn't find a better thread for a recent observation of mine that has left me frustrated/baffled.

I have been in the States since I was 9. In Bangladesh, I was taught how to read/write Bangla. Now I am 20 years old. I can still read/write, and I'd like to think my handwriting has gotten better (mostly because I can better hold a pen?). Needless to say, I obviously speak Bangla, too.

Now, I am not saying all this just for the sake of it. Recently, on several instances, I have met people who have immigrated from Bangladesh who have either stayed in the US for a shorter duration than myself or have spent more of their lives Bangladesh (for example, coming to the US after SSC/HSC or beyond), or BOTH. It is ABSOLUTELY baffling to me when they claim they can't read/write/and sometimes even SPEAK Bangla "as well as they used to." Is that possible? Unless you have suffered some grievous injury to your language-processing centers of the brain, I don't see how you can forget how to speak or write your PRIMARY language in 4-5 years or less. I have also noticed that these same fellows/fellowettes, when they go to Bangladesh, suddenly find rickshaws uncomfortable, Bangla music tacky, the streets smelly, the culture backwards ... ad infinitum.This, then, leads me to think they associate some form of "coolness" factor to not being able to speak Bangla - or, not being "Bengali" enough.

So, then, why is there a perception that being Bangladeshi is "uncool," especially to people who, arguably, should be MORE(!) Bangladeshi than anyone else?

And before someone says "Maybe these individuals you speak of were like this even when they lived in Bangladesh!" let me assure you, they weren't.

I understand that people have different "definitions" for what it means to be Bangladeshi; I am not debating that. All I am asking is how this sudden, 180 degree turn from your culture can be rationalized.

/Rant

Banglaguy
June 10, 2011, 12:52 PM
^^^ they are trying to be as white as possible basically. Its bs, people at school do this. . .

Alchemist
June 13, 2011, 11:28 PM
Bump. Couldn't find a better thread for a recent observation of mine that has left me frustrated/baffled.

I have been in the States since I was 9. In Bangladesh, I was taught how to read/write Bangla. Now I am 20 years old. I can still read/write, and I'd like to think my handwriting has gotten better (mostly because I can better hold a pen?). Needless to say, I obviously speak Bangla, too.

Now, I am not saying all this just for the sake of it. Recently, on several instances, I have met people who have immigrated from Bangladesh who have either stayed in the US for a shorter duration than myself or have spent more of their lives Bangladesh (for example, coming to the US after SSC/HSC or beyond), or BOTH. It is ABSOLUTELY baffling to me when they claim they can't read/write/and sometimes even SPEAK Bangla "as well as they used to." Is that possible? Unless you have suffered some grievous injury to your language-processing centers of the brain, I don't see how you can forget how to speak or write your PRIMARY language in 4-5 years or less. I have also noticed that these same fellows/fellowettes, when they go to Bangladesh, suddenly find rickshaws uncomfortable, Bangla music tacky, the streets smelly, the culture backwards ... ad infinitum.This, then, leads me to think they associate some form of "coolness" factor to not being able to speak Bangla - or, not being "Bengali" enough.

So, then, why is there a perception that being Bangladeshi is "uncool," especially to people who, arguably, should be MORE(!) Bangladeshi than anyone else?

And before someone says "Maybe these individuals you speak of were like this even when they lived in Bangladesh!" let me assure you, they weren't.

I understand that people have different "definitions" for what it means to be Bangladeshi; I am not debating that. All I am asking is how this sudden, 180 degree turn from your culture can be rationalized.

/Rant

You’ve actually highlighted a very alarming trend that’s been happening in Bangladesh for a while now. I’ve visited BD last year (after 6 years) and painfully observed a from of cultural struggle that a lot of Bangladeshi youths are suffering from, what I’d like to call an ‘alienation syndrome’. In my humble opinion, the reasons behind this ‘Being a Bangladeshi is uncool’ phenomenon are:

1. Solid idiots (most of the political figures and their collaborators)leading the country for ages and creating pathological frustrations among Bangladeshi citizens for ages.

2. Not enough Leading Lights (world class successful figures like scientists, inventors, leaders) in front of the current young generations.

3. A generation of English medium students (a lot of them) who have lack of respect for our history and culture and ‘try’ to follow foreign lifestyle. Social networking mediums (my next point) have helped these confused and shallow minded young people to spread their beliefs in others. In Bangla, it’s like a ‘Mohamari’.

4. The blessing of modern day technologies (mobile phone, laptop, facebook etc) and satellite TV channels (mostly Indian) created huge amount of confusion and identity crisis among these young minds who are not really sure, who they are.

5. Some parents were ok to allow their children to leave the ‘uncool Bangladeshi’ ways of thinking/living because they also think, Bangladeshi’s are uncool.

And last but not least,

6. Bangladesh cricket team taking ages to mature into a world class outfit hence frustrating the loyal supporters and making some supporters ‘clinically depressed’.

Age of globalization has come to Bangladesh and caught most of us off guard and unprepared. And our ‘wise’ leaders are busy with hortals. What a shame!

Alien
June 13, 2011, 11:52 PM
Am I less of a Bangladeshi just because I stay in US? Had I stayed in Dhaka, would all of a sudden I'd be earning billions to eradicate country's poverty? The fact that I don't live in BD yet support BD team dishing out advices, opinions, suggestions left n right all of a sudden makes me a hypocrite? Does it make me less of a Bangladeshi?


I have encountered few people who thinks just because we (expats) migrated we have no say or should refrain from any sort of criticism of Bangladesh be it cricket or politics or general mishaps.

Reality is those who have migrated contribute to the country more than any one living inside Bangladesh by a country mile. This is how:

1) By migrating we are reducing population. Thats one less person on your traffic jam on Dhanmondi or Malibagh.

2) We reduce burden on our resources

3) By sending money back, we injecting foreign cash on our economy

Alien
June 13, 2011, 11:56 PM
I think its subject to ones own opinion. For me, being Bangladeshi means someone who holds Bangladeshi citizenship. Thats it. Doesn't matter when they can read or write Bangla or if they are second generation expat who never set foot on the soil (even if they dont want to) or whether its someone who never set foot out of BD and wears punjabi-payjama every day. They are all Bangladeshi on equal proportion.

bujhee kom
June 14, 2011, 12:23 AM
Bump. Couldn't find a better thread for a recent observation of mine that has left me frustrated/baffled.

I have been in the States since I was 9. In Bangladesh, I was taught how to read/write Bangla. Now I am 20 years old. I can still read/write, and I'd like to think my handwriting has gotten better (mostly because I can better hold a pen?). Needless to say, I obviously speak Bangla, too.

Now, I am not saying all this just for the sake of it. Recently, on several instances, I have met people who have immigrated from Bangladesh who have either stayed in the US for a shorter duration than myself or have spent more of their lives Bangladesh (for example, coming to the US after SSC/HSC or beyond), or BOTH. It is ABSOLUTELY baffling to me when they claim they can't read/write/and sometimes even SPEAK Bangla "as well as they used to." Is that possible? Unless you have suffered some grievous injury to your language-processing centers of the brain, I don't see how you can forget how to speak or write your PRIMARY language in 4-5 years or less. I have also noticed that these same fellows/fellowettes, when they go to Bangladesh, suddenly find rickshaws uncomfortable, Bangla music tacky, the streets smelly, the culture backwards ... ad infinitum.This, then, leads me to think they associate some form of "coolness" factor to not being able to speak Bangla - or, not being "Bengali" enough.

So, then, why is there a perception that being Bangladeshi is "uncool," especially to people who, arguably, should be MORE(!) Bangladeshi than anyone else?

And before someone says "Maybe these individuals you speak of were like this even when they lived in Bangladesh!" let me assure you, they weren't.

I understand that people have different "definitions" for what it means to be Bangladeshi; I am not debating that. All I am asking is how this sudden, 180 degree turn from your culture can be rationalized.

/Rant

Electric brother, I simply call these fools "low class"! I know fools, relatives that tried to speak to me in Bangla with an accent! I swear, I b!tchslapped them till some of their brain came out on my hand like toothpaste if you know whaty I mean..I said you DagoonBhuiyan Pocha Kodur Bashi Torkari with Taaki Macher Ghu ever speak to me this way ever agin you SOB I teach you and you will learn....Amar shathey Bangla bolish with thoth baka accent jeno recently stroke hoise...abar kotha boley onek-ta synthesizer-er echo sounding, bhash bhasha with delay, amar jei rog chetsilo, those guys never visited me ever agin!! Jai hoke, eita naki ajkaalkar trend, fashion to speak Bangla with accent in Dhaka City!

Alien
June 14, 2011, 01:13 AM
When people say "I forgot Bangla because I spent too long in US/UK/etc" its not because they spent too long abroad, its because they are self-haters. Period.

How is that someone who studies in Kindy in US (then moves back to BD) have lifelong American accent while those that did HSC/A-Levels can't even tell between Bangla and Hebrew?

I lived in Bangladesh till I was 15. I went to an english medium school with only 1 subject in Bangla. Like rest of my peers, speaking was as good as it gets while we all were horrendous in writing and reading given all we ever read in Bangla was the infamous "Amar boi".

I managed to improve mine during my final years in BD by reading Masud Rana and Tin Goyenda which I found more interesting than Tagore/Nazrul stories and poems. Now 25, I can still read Bangla news online just as clearly as I could 10 years ago, no more no less. So those fakesters have no excuse either.

Severus
June 15, 2011, 01:45 AM
An interesting read http://www.lel.ed.ac.uk/~antonell/Inaugural-lecture-revised.ppt
<br />Posted via BC Mobile Edition

Antora
June 15, 2011, 04:06 AM
Bump. Couldn't find a better thread for a recent observation of mine that has left me frustrated/baffled.

I have been in the States since I was 9. In Bangladesh, I was taught how to read/write Bangla. Now I am 20 years old. I can still read/write, and I'd like to think my handwriting has gotten better (mostly because I can better hold a pen?). Needless to say, I obviously speak Bangla, too.

Now, I am not saying all this just for the sake of it. Recently, on several instances, I have met people who have immigrated from Bangladesh who have either stayed in the US for a shorter duration than myself or have spent more of their lives Bangladesh (for example, coming to the US after SSC/HSC or beyond), or BOTH. It is ABSOLUTELY baffling to me when they claim they can't read/write/and sometimes even SPEAK Bangla "as well as they used to." Is that possible? Unless you have suffered some grievous injury to your language-processing centers of the brain, I don't see how you can forget how to speak or write your PRIMARY language in 4-5 years or less. I have also noticed that these same fellows/fellowettes, when they go to Bangladesh, suddenly find rickshaws uncomfortable, Bangla music tacky, the streets smelly, the culture backwards ... ad infinitum.This, then, leads me to think they associate some form of "coolness" factor to not being able to speak Bangla - or, not being "Bengali" enough.

So, then, why is there a perception that being Bangladeshi is "uncool," especially to people who, arguably, should be MORE(!) Bangladeshi than anyone else?

And before someone says "Maybe these individuals you speak of were like this even when they lived in Bangladesh!" let me assure you, they weren't.

I understand that people have different "definitions" for what it means to be Bangladeshi; I am not debating that. All I am asking is how this sudden, 180 degree turn from your culture can be rationalized.

/Rant

You’ve actually highlighted a very alarming trend that’s been happening in Bangladesh for a while now. I’ve visited BD last year (after 6 years) and painfully observed a from of cultural struggle that a lot of Bangladeshi youths are suffering from, what I’d like to call an ‘alienation syndrome’. In my humble opinion, the reasons behind this ‘Being a Bangladeshi is uncool’ phenomenon are:

1. Solid idiots (most of the political figures and their collaborators)leading the country for ages and creating pathological frustrations among Bangladeshi citizens for ages.

2. Not enough Leading Lights (world class successful figures like scientists, inventors, leaders) in front of the current young generations.

3. A generation of English medium students (a lot of them) who have lack of respect for our history and culture and ‘try’ to follow foreign lifestyle. Social networking mediums (my next point) have helped these confused and shallow minded young people to spread their beliefs in others. In Bangla, it’s like a ‘Mohamari’.

!

Electrequiem and Alchemist bhaiya, I agree with you guys. It's actually very annoying. I mean when I go to BD it takes me about a week and I am able to speak in Bangla fluently with minimal use of english words in my sentences ( however my cousins still tease me that I have an accent :() , however my point is if I, being born and brought up out of Bangladesh can read, write and speak in Bangla, then why can't they? In Bangladesh, everything is in Bangla. There, not only am I forced to speak Bangla, but I am also forced to read bangla too. And it too annoys me how these people "forget" bangla when living abroad, or simply "struggle" to speak in Bangla whilst living in BD. Like WTH?
for example. I went to Gulshan shopper's world and there, standing next to me was a lady around the age of 45ish who had to get her sister to translate in english what the guy at the shop was saying. The sister was telling the guy "amar bon onek bochor america thakey tai bangla bhuley gieychey", eder dhong dekhey amar eto raag utheychilo! I was just giving them the evil stare the whole time they were there! and then there were these two girls ... maney emon bhabey bangla bolchilo money hocchilo bangla boltey giey tader shob dath porey jabey! I felt like slapping them ( my tollerance towards certain things is very minimal and at times I resolve to violence :P ).

And as Alchemist Bhaiya mentioned English medium schools, even though I agree but it is a very broad generalisation. I know a lot of people from English medium schools who are deffinately not like that. For example this apu I know who lives here, she went to an english medium school and tutored me for Bangla ( as I am sitting a Bangla exam this year), and to my Parents suprise she did a very good job of it. She taught me basic sentence structuring, spelling correction and grammar! And to be honest, she did a better job of teaching me Bangla than my actual Bangla teacher at language school. so then english medium thing doesn't apply to everyone, however I do agree that it is because of these schools, that a culture like this in the elit class of Bangladesh is happening. Also to add to Alchemist Bhaiya's list I would like to mention Hindi channels. Hindi channels teach an individual the essential skills to be an oshobho. I can confidently say more than 90% of the population in Bangladesh do not watch Bangla channels. All of these factors contribute to this rediculous culture in Bangladesh. I mean its easiter to say তুমি instead of "two-mii"!!!!

Antora
June 15, 2011, 04:16 AM
I actually hate Robindra songit ( not a dig at Sohel for the thread ), and it puts me to sleep. The slow pan panani is excrutiating. Does that make me any less of a Bangali ( deshi )?


I have the same question :P although there is one Rabindra sangeet "aguner porosh moni" which I really like.
Well are there any people in this forum, who have indigenous backgrounds?
<br />Posted via BC Mobile Edition (Blackberry)

oh oh oh! Pick me! picke me! :P I do :P well kind of :S Both sides of my family have very (oriental) Asian features. My Dad's side looks bermese and mum's side umm they just look :S Asian? :S Abbu said that my Mum's side are decendents from Mongolia ( we have something in our blood that indicates that apparently :S) and Da'd's side may have had a ( or few) Bermese people in the family. Out of their siblings, My parents are th least asian looking, hence I don't really have the features, but my brother looks pretty Asian :P especially the extremely"bocha nakh part :P

simon
June 15, 2011, 08:20 AM
I've learned one thing that is, being a Bdeshi,if u want to be patriot than go abroad.

Jadukor
June 15, 2011, 12:28 PM
I actually hate Robindra songit ( not a dig at Sohel for the thread ), and it puts me to sleep. The slow pan panani is excrutiating. Does that make me any less of a Bangali ( deshi )?
to strictly answer your question: no i don't think it makes you any less of a deshi... just a little ignorant that's all....

Banglaguy
June 15, 2011, 12:50 PM
For me being Bangladesh means that. . . I am a part of a people who gave their lives for me to be who I am. And no outsider would ever understand the attachment I have with the country I wish I was born in.

bujhee kom
June 15, 2011, 01:49 PM
For me being Bangladesh means that. . . I am a part of a people who gave their lives for me to be who I am. And no outsider would ever understand the attachment I have with the country I wish I was born in.

Simply beautiful brother! Top notch expression!!:flag:

Banglaguy
June 15, 2011, 02:20 PM
Simply beautiful brother! Top notch expression!!:flag:

Thank you bhai :)

iDumb
June 15, 2011, 11:13 PM
if you can open up a Foreign Currency account/normal account in a Bangladeshi bank, and take part in various investment schemes, you are a Bangladeshi. This requirement is set by Bangladesh government.

Banglaguy
June 16, 2011, 05:31 AM
if you can open up a Foreign Currency account/normal account in a Bangladeshi bank, and take part in various investment schemes, you are a Bangladeshi. This requirement is set by Bangladesh government.

Huh? Why does the Government care about that, don't they have more important stuff to deal with?

iDumb
June 16, 2011, 11:06 AM
Huh? Why does the Government care about that, don't they have more important stuff to deal with?

like what? If government doesn't make policies regarding money, then who will?

They define being bangladeshi as anyone who has "an origin in Bangladesh", meaning you are a Bangladeshi if you were born there, or any of your parents, or any of your grand parents were born there. You can also be a bangladeshi if you are married to one. This is constitutional definition, not mine.

bujhee kom
June 16, 2011, 11:32 AM
I believe if you have a Bodna in your bathroom floor and if your kitchen stinks like Shutki maach + onion from half a mile away and if your kitchen wall has stain form Daal/dail/lintel splash stain all over then you MUST be a Bangladeshi!


+ If you always have a turmaric/Holood soaked khichuri looking bhaat/a grain of old rice stuck to the outside of your mouth, no matter what time it is, what day it is, inside the house or out, then you definitely a Bangladeshi.

Ohh also if you start all of your sentences, all of your conversation with "Ore Hasina, Ore Khaleda..." ...no doubt you are a Bangladeshi!

Banglaguy
June 16, 2011, 12:28 PM
like what? If government doesn't make policies regarding money, then who will?

They define being bangladeshi as anyone who has "an origin in Bangladesh", meaning you are a Bangladeshi if you were born there, or any of your parents, or any of your grand parents were born there. You can also be a bangladeshi if you are married to one. This is constitutional definition, not mine.

So, if I married a white-english girl, she can become Bengali?

I believe if you have a Bodna in your bathroom floor and if your kitchen stinks like Shutki maach + onion from half a mile away and if your kitchen wall has stain form Daal/dail/lintel splash stain all over then you MUST be a Bangladeshi!


+ If you always have a turmaric/Holood soaked khichuri looking bhaat/a grain of old rice stuck to the outside of your mouth, no matter what time it is, what day it is, inside the house or out, then you definitely a Bangladeshi.

Ohh also if you start all of your sentences, all of your conversation with "Ore Hasina, Ore Khaleda..." ...no doubt you are a Bangladeshi!

Haha! Lol, you are one funny guy....
I have all of that... Except the Shutki one, and the Bhaat on my mouth..

asdfjkl
June 17, 2011, 02:55 AM
Any conversation in birthday/marriage day party will end up at politics and yelling there after.

Converting price into current rate of TAKA and compare.

Enthusiastic about showing the direction.

Never come to a situation where you can say "I have no idea"

Banglaguy
June 17, 2011, 05:12 AM
Oh well, who cares about politics..

iDumb
June 17, 2011, 05:12 AM
So, if I married a white-english girl, she can become Bengali?

.

Yes, she can become Bangladeshi (not bengali) and enjoy all the perks. It shouldn't be really surprising given 95% of us here are American, Canadian, English or Australian despite being "100%" (counting your parents only) Bengali blood. Bangladesh has similar laws.

Banglaguy
June 17, 2011, 05:18 AM
I have ''Lal'' Passport, which makes me special in Bangladesh for some reason. So, is tourism big in Bangladesh from foreigners?

DJ Sahastra
June 17, 2011, 03:39 PM
Not to sidetrack the thread but i think anyone who thinks Bangla is uncool is indeed an idiot. As a language, bangla is one of the coolest and sweetest.

My favourite lines:

Akash Poni Onek Dure
Jemim kore meg jaye go ure
Jemim kore hawae bashe bashe
Koi tahar mote tumi amar jeebone ashonato

That's what i call sweeeet!

Naimul_Hd
June 17, 2011, 07:38 PM
Not to sidetrack the thread but i think anyone who thinks Bangla is uncool is indeed an idiot. As a language, bangla is one of the coolest and sweetest.

My favourite lines:

Akash Poni Onek Dure
Jemim kore meg jaye go ure
Jemim kore hawae bashe bashe
Koi tahar mote tumi amar jeebone ashonato

That's what i call sweeeet!

Yes. It is indeed. Once i heard that, Bangla has been announced as the sweetest language in the world by UNESCO. Yet many of us undermine our own language.

Times of India reports (http://articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com/2010-04-22/india/28116247_1_bengali-new-year-social-networking-sites-online-voting)

The Bengali New Year couldn't have started on a sweeter note. If a message circulating on social networking sites like Twitter and Facebook is to be believed, Bengali has been voted the sweetest language in the world. Conducted by Unesco, the vote ranks Spanish and Dutch as the second and third sweetest tongues respectively.

Isnaad
June 17, 2011, 10:11 PM
I've learned one thing that is, being a Bdeshi,if u want to be patriot than go abroad.

This is so true..! My patriotism aroused in me when I went to the USA for a year in 07. I missed cricket BADLY! In fact, that was the reason I joined BC! ;)
<br />Posted via BC Mobile Edition (Opera Mobile)

Isnaad
June 17, 2011, 10:16 PM
Yes, she can become Bangladeshi (not bengali) and enjoy all the perks. It shouldn't be really surprising given 95% of us here are American, Canadian, English or Australian despite being "100%" (counting your parents only) Bengali blood. Bangladesh has similar laws.

Bangladesh, like the United States, adopt both Jus Soli and Jus Sanguinis.
<br />Posted via BC Mobile Edition (Opera Mobile)

Banglaguy
June 18, 2011, 04:53 AM
But Spanish and Dutch isn't really that sweet IMO.

Severus
June 18, 2011, 07:33 AM
signs that you are Bangladeshi


Your parents wants you to become a doctor or engineer and no other degree matters
You look 100 prospective candidates before finally choosing your bride
Your father tells you why his childhood was better because he had to walk 10 miles to school everyday
You get a lecture for almost everything you have done (wrong)
You ask every people you meet where they are from (desher bari) even though our country is not that big or diverge or has many states.
Your parents ALWAYS compare you to other kids they know
You can only think of a fastfood joint or chinese restaurant for a hot dating spot
You have panta and khichuri only for pohela boisakh.
You no longer worry if a bloody or gory picture is on the headlines
Your parents expect you to be the best friend of the best student in your class
Mother-in-laws must criticize everything their daughter-in-law do
Seeing a boy and girl walk side by side is a matter of discussion
You have a back up refrigerator for qurbani times
You actually eat more at iftaar than the combination of your normal time breakfast, lunch and dnner
You fight for keeping that bowl of mutton rezala close to you when you go to a wedding
Your relatives and inlaws fight for the share of your wedding gifts
You have a VERY difficult time eating out when you are at other countries
You have to call just about all your parent's friends "Auntie and Uncle."

Banglaguy
June 18, 2011, 08:11 AM
signs that you are Bangladeshi


Your parents wants you to become a doctor or engineer and no other degree matters
You look 100 prospective candidates before finally choosing your bride
Your father tells you why his childhood was better because he had to walk 10 miles to school everyday
You get a lecture for almost everything you have done (wrong)
You ask every people you meet where they are from (desher bari) even though our country is not that big or diverge or has many states.
Your parents ALWAYS compare you to other kids they know
You can only think of a fastfood joint or chinese restaurant for a hot dating spot
You have panta and khichuri only for pohela boisakh.
You no longer worry if a bloody or gory picture is on the headlines
Your parents expect you to be the best friend of the best student in your class
Mother-in-laws must criticize everything their daughter-in-law do
Seeing a boy and girl walk side by side is a matter of discussion
You have a back up refrigerator for qurbani times
You actually eat more at iftaar than the combination of your normal time breakfast, lunch and dnner
You fight for keeping that bowl of mutton rezala close to you when you go to a wedding
Your relatives and inlaws fight for the share of your wedding gifts
You have a VERY difficult time eating out when you are at other countries
You have to call just about all your parent's friends "Auntie and Uncle."


Aha! 85% correct for me. . .

DJ Sahastra
June 18, 2011, 02:03 PM
signs that you are Bangladeshi


Your parents wants you to become a doctor or engineer and no other degree matters
You look 100 prospective candidates before finally choosing your bride
Your father tells you why his childhood was better because he had to walk 10 miles to school everyday
You get a lecture for almost everything you have done (wrong)
You ask every people you meet where they are from (desher bari) even though our country is not that big or diverge or has many states.
Your parents ALWAYS compare you to other kids they know
You can only think of a fastfood joint or chinese restaurant for a hot dating spot
You have panta and khichuri only for pohela boisakh.
You no longer worry if a bloody or gory picture is on the headlines
Your parents expect you to be the best friend of the best student in your class
Mother-in-laws must criticize everything their daughter-in-law do
Seeing a boy and girl walk side by side is a matter of discussion
You have a back up refrigerator for qurbani times
You actually eat more at iftaar than the combination of your normal time breakfast, lunch and dnner
You fight for keeping that bowl of mutton rezala close to you when you go to a wedding
Your relatives and inlaws fight for the share of your wedding gifts
You have a VERY difficult time eating out when you are at other countries
You have to call just about all your parent's friends "Auntie and Uncle."


12.5/18 = 70%

So that makes an Indian like me 70% Bangladeshi :). I always assumed that being associated with Pabna should automatically make me 100%. But, not bad.

simon
June 18, 2011, 02:33 PM
great to know abt Bangla being announced as the sweetest language. :)
btw good ones from Severus ,here are some more:

-bhaat na khaile money hoy kichui khainai,
-Masters paash korenai maney shey oshikkhito(even if that person is a graduate)
-bidesh e ek bangali ar ek bangalir shaathey dekha hole uchcho shore kotha bola,emon jeno tara
kaane shune na.
-regular namaaz porey na kintu ekdin namaz porey hotath kore khubi dharmik bhaab dekhano.

Ashfaq
June 18, 2011, 03:44 PM
Recently, on several instances, I have met people who have immigrated from Bangladesh who have either stayed in the US for a shorter duration than myself or have spent more of their lives Bangladesh (for example, coming to the US after SSC/HSC or beyond), or BOTH. It is ABSOLUTELY baffling to me when they claim they can't read/write/and sometimes even SPEAK Bangla "as well as they used to." Is that possible? Unless you have suffered some grievous injury to your language-processing centers of the brain, I don't see how you can forget how to speak or write your PRIMARY language in 4-5 years or less.

Well, it's absolutely impossible to forget a language even if it falls into disuse, let alone ones primary language. I'll let you draw whatever conclusion you want to draw about that.


But it is entirely plausible that one's skill with any language may suffer. I was a very articulate speaker of Bangla. I have medals to show for it. But after SSC, my medium of education changed. The sudden and brutal switch from Bangla to English twisted my perception somewhat. Now I'm not as good as I was in Bangla, nor am I particularly imaginative in my English.

It's a great shame really. But there's very little anybody can do about it. Unless there's more textbooks of modern science in Bangla, all science graduates will have a four-six year period when the only Bangla they read will be newspaper.

Alien
June 19, 2011, 11:24 PM
Spouse must be BA pash and/or MA pash.
Having head shaved when you are born.
Asking "ek cup chaa dey" when you get home.
Finding oyesters, octopus disgusting while something like shutki ok.
Respect senior students in school.
<br />Posted via BC Mobile Edition (Android)

simon
June 20, 2011, 04:56 AM
ektu English bollei shey Highly educated & rich.

Alien
June 20, 2011, 05:38 AM
3. A generation of English medium students (a lot of them) who have lack of respect for our history and culture and ‘try’ to follow foreign lifestyle. Social networking mediums (my next point) have helped these confused and shallow minded young people to spread their beliefs in others. In Bangla, it’s like a ‘Mohamari’.


I beg to differ. I went to english medium school and if all you learn is Shakespeare, Charles Dickinson, history of WW2 then of course you will know more the world and less about the country. Its not "lack of respect", its how they are brought up by school and parents.

In my school we sang national anthem every morning (get punished if we don't sing loud enough), did ekushey februrary songs and dramas around early Feb etc to name a few.

Most have poor reading writing skills in Bangla. Because they do 1 subject in Bangla while doing 8 others in English. Its the same reason why students in Bangla medium have poor english because for them its the reverse.

simon
June 20, 2011, 09:53 AM
^^^the percentage of youngsters not so patriotic is high in English medium school comparing to Bangla mediums.
still can't quite blame the English med schools,we go to Eng med schols to learn Eng better & that is doing good to our dvlpmnt as a country but the dominance of english in those schools makes the pupils feel different,they r more interested in western world/culture.
the ones to blame are the parents who don't teach their kids to speak in (proper) Bangla when they r not at school,and teach them more abt the country/culture.
though Eng med school should take more initiatives to get these kids involved into our culture/society.

Isnaad
June 20, 2011, 12:03 PM
signs that you are Bangladeshi


Your parents wants you to become a doctor or engineer and no other degree matters
You look 100 prospective candidates before finally choosing your bride
Your father tells you why his childhood was better because he had to walk 10 miles to school everyday
You get a lecture for almost everything you have done (wrong)
You ask every people you meet where they are from (desher bari) even though our country is not that big or diverge or has many states.
Your parents ALWAYS compare you to other kids they know
You can only think of a fastfood joint or chinese restaurant for a hot dating spot
You have panta and khichuri only for pohela boisakh.
You no longer worry if a bloody or gory picture is on the headlines
Your parents expect you to be the best friend of the best student in your class
Mother-in-laws must criticize everything their daughter-in-law do
Seeing a boy and girl walk side by side is a matter of discussion
You have a back up refrigerator for qurbani times
You actually eat more at iftaar than the combination of your normal time breakfast, lunch and dnner
You fight for keeping that bowl of mutton rezala close to you when you go to a wedding
Your relatives and inlaws fight for the share of your wedding gifts
You have a VERY difficult time eating out when you are at other countries
You have to call just about all your parent's friends "Auntie and Uncle."


17.5/18! Thats 97%. :)
<br />Posted via BC Mobile Edition (Opera Mobile)

Alien
June 20, 2011, 07:03 PM
With patriotism, you cant teach it to someone. It either comes naturally or it doesnt. Just like some people are are religious others arent despite living in a muslim country. I am sure by being less religious we wouldnt automatically tag someone as bad person. Similarly being less patriotic shouldnt necessarily be a bad thing either.

I am not patriotic myself. But that doesnt mean I dont like my country or culture. My fluency in Bangla (reading and writing) is a way above average despite not living in the country for 10 years and doing only 1 subject in bangla in english medium school before that.
Just because I dont run around with patriotic fervour doesnt maean I contribute any less to the country.

With english medium school, I dont know what else they are supposed to do to make kids more patriotic. In bygone days I have seen plenty of functions and events centred around our culture and history.
<br />Posted via BC Mobile Edition (Android)

Jadukor
June 21, 2011, 12:42 AM
^^^the percentage of youngsters not so patriotic is high in English medium school comparing to Bangla mediums.

how did you make this assessment? I am curious because i went to an English medium school during the 90s

Beamer
June 21, 2011, 11:34 AM
to strictly answer your question: no i don't think it makes you any less of a deshi... just a little ignorant that's all....

How so? There is a thing called individual taste. Just because I prefer Bangla pop music over Rabindra shangeet doesn't make one ignorant or less Bangali. You sound ignorant to be blunt.

AsifTheManRahman
June 21, 2011, 11:54 AM
Ami English medium school e learn kortam, tai ami Bengali speak korte pari na, sometimes ektu ektu cheshta kori, but mostly ami too kewlz Bengali bolar jonno.

bujhee kom
June 21, 2011, 12:01 PM
Hahhahaha....Kewlz maney ki Asif dada? Kaua naki? Kaak? Crows?...hahahaha


Ohhooo bujhey gesi...hohohoho...Too kewlz Bangla bolar jonno...hahahah...super...that's me Asif bhai, amakey apni DMP DB police-er moto hatey natey dhorey felechen!!


On a very serious note...these fools who think they are too L.L. kewlze for Bangla will have bamboo tree growing on their buttocks some day...due to my abhishaap!! Then them fools will recite famous Bengali words 24/7..
..."Bash baganer jhoper nichey amar pacha koi?
O mago ma pachai amar baash foorey roi!!"...hahahaha ebiong tara kandben tokhon...shudhu kanben...and the Sholok bolar Kajla didi is long gone!!

roman
June 21, 2011, 12:08 PM
^^^the percentage of youngsters not so patriotic is high in English medium school comparing to Bangla mediums.
.

how did you make this assessment? I am curious because i went to an English medium school during the 90s
I would like to know that too. I dont know about this generation but the picture is different for the generation that went to English medium schools in the 80s-90s.....

Jadukor
June 21, 2011, 05:16 PM
How so? There is a thing called individual taste. Just because I prefer Bangla pop music over Rabindra shangeet doesn't make one ignorant or less Bangali. You sound ignorant to be blunt.
Your individual taste might make you prefer any genre of music but to reduce Rabindranath's work to a description of "an excruciatingly slow pan panani" displays your lack of knowledge of his work, influence and contribution to Bengali literature and culture.
Its like if i said amar shakespear er natok valo laage na because its hudai pechal... amar humaiyun ahmed valo laage. If i said that you or others would call me ignorant as well.

Alien
June 22, 2011, 06:06 AM
Your individual taste might make you prefer any genre of music but to reduce Rabindranath's work to a description of "an excruciatingly slow pan panani" displays your lack of knowledge of his work, influence and contribution to Bengali literature and culture.
Its like if i said amar shakespear er natok valo laage na because its hudai pechal... amar humaiyun ahmed valo laage. If i said that you or others would call me ignorant as well.

Both Shakespeare and Tagore did wonders for their generations. But that doesn't mean next 50 generations have to appreciate it. And why would liking Humayun kabir over Shakespeare make you ignorant?

Jadukor
June 22, 2011, 06:49 AM
Both Shakespeare and Tagore did wonders for their generations. But that doesn't mean next 50 generations have to appreciate it. And why would liking Humayun kabir over Shakespeare make you ignorant?

What do you mean by they did wonders for their generations? Shakespeare died in the 17th century! the appreciation of his work (or Rabindranath's) didn't stop during his life time/generation but it actually grew and found a prominent place in the history of literature and even went into our school books.

I am not sure what generation you come from but there is still a GREAT deal of appreciation for Rabindranath's work in Bengali societies and it has stood the test of time just as works of Shakespeare, Mozart, Da Vinci etc etc have. Sufficient knowledge about these people may not make you like their work but it would at least make you RESPECT their contribution and provide you with the technical tools to criticize (just as many critics have done over the years).

The key word in my post was "hudai pechal"... an analogy to Beamer's "slow pan pan panani". The latter part about liking Humayun AHMED was just to complete the sentence in a similar way.

Alien
June 22, 2011, 08:21 AM
What do you mean by they did wonders for their generations? Shakespeare died in the 17th century! the appreciation of his work (or Rabindranath's) didn't stop during his life time/generation but it actually grew and found a prominent place in the history of literature and even went into our school books.

Meaning their plays and poems entertained people in their respective generations. Unfortunately today generation don't like it (me included) and that's not necessarily a bad thing.



I am not sure what generation you come from but there is still a GREAT deal of appreciation for Rabindranath's work in Bengali societies and it has stood the test of time just as works of Shakespeare, Mozart, Da Vinci etc etc have.


I was born in 85 so Gen X I believe. I am not saying everyone hates those aforementioned people. I just wouldn't read shakespeare on the train or listen to Robindronath songs on my Ipod. At first I thought I was the odd one (and bad one), but now looking around there are many who feels that way.

My mother is a hardcore Robindronath fan and good for them. Just like they don't think highly of today's artists, I don't appreciate theirs as well. Its just matter of taste thats all. I got nothing against Robindronath/Nazrul.


Sufficient knowledge about these people may not make you like their work but it would at least make you RESPECT their contribution and provide you with the technical tools to criticize (just as many critics have done over the years).


The key word in my post was "hudai pechal"... an analogy to Beamer's "slow pan pan panani". The latter part about liking Humayun AHMED was just to complete the sentence in a similar way.

Well criticising them does not amount to disrespect. They are just poets and playwright, not some holy Prophet that we can't say anything negative about them.

Beamer
June 22, 2011, 09:55 AM
Your individual taste might make you prefer any genre of music but to reduce Rabindranath's work to a description of "an excruciatingly slow pan panani" displays your lack of knowledge of his work, influence and contribution to Bengali literature and culture.
Its like if i said amar shakespear er natok valo laage na because its hudai pechal... amar humaiyun ahmed valo laage. If i said that you or others would call me ignorant as well.

No, I won't call you ignorant. I would understand that every individual has different taste and preferences. There is a thing called tolerance and in BC, its practiced and even encouraged. There are dissenting views that are shared here everyday. There is no problem with that. But, soon as you start calling people names, such as "ignorant", who don't conform to your likes or views, there will be problem.

I have no intention to disrespect Rabi thakur. His works speaks for himself. I admire his poems, novels and sketches. I just don't like the songs, and that's for my ears only, and in BC, I can say it without hesitation. If you want to be an intolerant fool ( yes, calling you names, since you started the trend ), then you better take your game somewhere else.

Jadukor
June 22, 2011, 11:20 AM
i don't think i would have answered your question if you simply said you don't like Robi thakur's songs... it was the slow pan panani bit that compelled me to defend him. You asked whether it makes you less of a bangladeshi or not?.. I simply said it doesnt but it shows your lack of knowledge about his work. But that's just my own opinion based on your comment about his songs.

I am always ready to accept what i dish out so if you think I am an intolerant fool then all i have to say is that i respect your opinion.

lets close the chapter here shall we?

Beamer
June 22, 2011, 11:33 AM
And, you just assumed that since I don't like it, so I must have no knowledge about it. I think that's an ignorant position to take. Anyway, chapter closed. I completely respect your right to defend Rabi thakurs' songs. You can do it any day without resorting to name calling. Take care.