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Zeeshan
May 24, 2011, 02:09 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Bangladesh-related_topics

/shutdownforum

Banglaguy
May 24, 2011, 02:11 AM
Although interesting I guess. . . What is the point of it?

Zeeshan
May 24, 2011, 02:13 AM
Although interesting I guess. . . What is the point of it?

There are many visitors (may be foreigners) come to this forum asking for information. Sometimes expatriates themselves want to know many useful information. This should serve for the go-to link for everything. Heck, even "I" took 3 years to find this portal. The point is no more blunt or sharper than your posts.

Banglaguy
May 24, 2011, 02:17 AM
I was just wondering boss man, sorry if I was rude :)

Zeeshan
May 24, 2011, 02:19 AM
I was just wondering boss man, sorry if I was rude :)

No problem, sorry if "I" was rude. :)

Makeup hug?

Banglaguy
May 24, 2011, 02:24 AM
Hug me Brother!

Rabz
May 24, 2011, 04:14 AM
Awwww you two...

http://clocktopia.net/images/smilies/1276674027970%5B1%5D.jpg

Very useful link though Zee.

Zeeshan
July 16, 2011, 01:51 AM
http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/Bangladesh

deshimon
July 16, 2011, 04:05 AM
Not possible finish to read in a single month. Huge!

PoorFan
July 16, 2011, 04:43 AM
http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/Bangladesh
Nice find I guess, worth reading and passing time.:)

Banglaguy
July 16, 2011, 05:48 AM
http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/Bangladesh

Lol! The picture is becoming my avatar!

deshimon
July 16, 2011, 05:53 AM
http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/Bangladesh

great! so funny!:applause::applause:

Banglaguy
July 16, 2011, 05:57 AM
In the beginning, Sakib lived in a piece of territory called Ballsack.

Eve teasing, Playing Ludo, Loitering around and doing nothing, Running from natural disaster, producing strikes for no reason, maramari, spitting and peeing on the roads

Lol, just some of the true yet funny randomness.

simon
July 16, 2011, 06:51 AM
thanks Zee.
few days ago one of my friend asked me,apart from Tigers what else are u people known for,I proudly answered ,the largest beach,then he asked me how long it is,I said I don't know.:(
now I know It is an unbroken 125 km sandy sea beach,same as Shahadat/Rasel's pace.

Night_wolf
July 16, 2011, 06:56 AM
Awwww you two...

http://clocktopia.net/images/smilies/1276674027970%5B1%5D.jpg

Very useful link though Zee.

lol!

Naimul_Hd
July 16, 2011, 07:03 AM
http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/Bangladesh

HHS !!!!!! Good find ZeeshanM

Ajfar
July 16, 2011, 11:14 AM
Nice find Zeeshan bhai. Thanks for sharing.
<br />Posted via BC Mobile Edition (iPhone)

BD_2015
July 16, 2011, 04:48 PM
Really nice reading and funny .Thanks Zeeshan bro
Excellent work whoever done it.

Antora
July 17, 2011, 12:48 AM
http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/Bangladesh

hahahahaha! Me like it :D

auntu
July 17, 2011, 12:26 PM
Thanks Gople. Good one.

bujhee kom
July 18, 2011, 01:02 AM
Uhuummm everyone thanking Gopala here...and in the mean time Miahs I read the Government Birth-control policy/advertisement in the Population section in that web-site and maan, my head dropped from my neck....maan, I told my wife, showed her that paragraph and I got a hard slap from her...Dhuuurrr miahs..bhua, amray shudhu shudhu thappor ta khawaila!!!

simon
July 18, 2011, 05:25 AM
^^^:lol:
uchit shikkha hoisey,eto section thakte eita keno dekhailen?apni miah asholei kom bujhen :-p

Naimul_Hd
July 18, 2011, 06:22 AM
Uhuummm everyone thanking Gopala here...and in the mean time Miahs I read the Government Birth-control policy/advertisement in the Population section in that web-site and maan, my head dropped from my neck....maan, I told my wife, showed her that paragraph and I got a hard slap from her...Dhuuurrr miahs..bhua, amray shudhu shudhu thappor ta khawaila!!!

boudi ke amar salam ! :D

Naimul_Hd
July 21, 2011, 05:27 AM
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Naimul_Hd
July 22, 2011, 07:52 AM
Lurking Under Bangladesh: The Next Great Earthquake? (http://blogs.ei.columbia.edu/2011/07/13/lurking-under-bangladesh-the-next-great-earthquake/#.Tichhs3OJmI.facebook)



<iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/26131107?title=0&byline=0&portrait=0" frameborder="0" height="265" width="400"></iframe>


After the recent great quakes that have swept away entire coastlines and cities in Japan, Haiti and Sumatra, scientists are now looking hard (http://www.banglapire.org/)at the nation that may suffer the gravest threat of all: Bangladesh. A new documentary from the Earth Institute (http://www.earth.columbia.edu/videos/watch/337)follows seismologists as they trace signs of deeply buried active faults, past movements of the earth, and sudden, catastrophic river-course changes.


With more than 160 million people, Bangladesh is the most crowded place on earth, and one of the poorest–and it is growing fast. It sits on the world’s largest river delta, close to sea level, which exposes it to tsunamis and the possibility of rivers jumping their banks in the event of earthquake. And, it is furiously putting up bridges and multistory buildings that increase its vulnerability. Scientists have come to recognize that it sits at the juncture of several active tectonic plate boundaries–including the tail end of the one that caused the 2004 Sumatra tsunami that killed over 200,000 people, 1,300 miles south. Syed Humayun Akhter, a seismologist at the Dhaka University Earth Observatory (http://sites.google.com/site/shadueo/), warns that an earthquake near the crowded capital could dwarf other modern tragedies.


This year saw the start of a five-year, $5 million project to chart the hazards (http://www.banglapire.org/), funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation’s Partnerships for International Research and Education (http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=12819)program. Led by seismologists at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in conjunction with Dhaka University, the team includes specialists from Vanderbilt University, the University of Minnesota and Queens College, and researchers in Germany, Italy and India. The scientists have been upgrading a network of seismometers that registers tiny tremors far below. This allows them to better map active faults buried under as much as 12 miles of sand and mud laid down by the mighty rivers that drain the Himalayas. They are also drilling some 250 wells near riverbeds to take sediment samples. These, they hope, will reveal the scope and timing of past earthquakes and river-course shifts that may have wiped out large swaths of countryside–though at times when population and infrastructure were far less dense. The goal is to give Bangladeshi scientists and leaders the tools they need to understand, and minimize, the risks.

http://blogs.ei.columbia.edu/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/bangladhesh-011l-300x225.jpgSeismologist Leonardo Seeber inspects sediments along a riverbank in northern Bangladesh

“Like the great delta on which Bangladesh is confined, we find ourselves at a strategic confluence between earth science, natural hazard engineering and international relations,” says Leonardo Seeber (http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/user/nano), a Lamont seismologist working on the project. This month, Lamont seismologist Michael Steckler (http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/user/steckler), the project’s lead investigator, was in Washington to help launch a new program run jointly by NSF and the U.S. Agency for International Development (http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=121003&org=NSF&preview=false)designed to advance such collaborations with developing countries. “This partnership will help particularly with the application of science, technology and innovation to accelerate global development, with huge benefits for industrialized and developing countries alike,” said John P. Holdern, director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, speaking at the event.


Watch the documentary (http://www.earth.columbia.edu/videos/watch/337)
Read a Science magazine article on the threat (http://www.sciencemag.org/content/332/6035/1256.full.pdf)
Visit the project website (http://www.banglapire.org/)