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Zunaid
March 7, 2012, 10:23 AM
ADELAIDE: In a vicious attack on Indian culture (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/topic/Indian-culture) and Indian cricket team of which he was the coach, Greg Chappell (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/topic/Greg-Chappell) has said that the side lacked leaders because parents, school teachers and coaches made all the decisions in the Indian system.


read more (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/sports/cricket/top-stories/Greg-Chappell-attacks-Indian-culture-and-cricket-team/articleshow/12177302.cms)

I quote more:


"The (Indian) culture is very different, it's not a team culture. They lack leaders in the team because they are not trained to be leaders. From an early age, their parents make all the decisions, their schoolteachers make their decisions, their cricket coaches make the decisions," Chappell said.
Is it really vicious or is it the truth about what keeps us down? What I quote above is also valid in Bangladesh. Not sure if the Poms did it to us but:

"The Poms (British) taught them really well to keep their head down. For if someone was deemed to be responsible, they'd get punished. So the Indians have learned to avoid responsibility. So before taking responsibility for any decisions, they prefer not to," Chappell was quoted as saying during a promotional event for his book 'Fierce Focus'.
Avoiding responsibility is quite the norm in Bangladesh too. And, you must've noticed all our coaches who participated here had hinted one time or the other about the lack of accountability and responsibility and the preponderance of the excuse culture.

Not sure whether this belongs here or in Bangladesh cricket or in Forget Cricket.

F6_Turbo
March 7, 2012, 11:27 AM
All I know is...Ashraful isn't to blame for anything, poor bloke got dropped after one bad performance :(

Zunaid
March 7, 2012, 11:29 AM
All I know is...Ashraful isn't to blame for anything, poor bloke got dropped after one bad performance :(

Funny man. You've been drinking again. He will never live down that quote.

F6_Turbo
March 7, 2012, 11:33 AM
I'm not sure I completely agree with him, my drivers, caretakers, buas, interns, nurses, receptionists, refuse to follow orders :mad:

But he is right that there is no sense of personal responsibility, and EVERYONE is in the business of passing the buck in the subcontinent.

Navo
March 7, 2012, 01:37 PM
Greg Chappell has certainly imbibed the 'pass the buck' spirit of the subcontinent.

Dilscoop
March 7, 2012, 01:57 PM
become a doctor or a lawyer or no bhat for you!

Zeeshan
March 7, 2012, 05:57 PM
Okay.... he may be a bit abstruse but truth hurts. Not sure if I disagree with him entirely but yes he's right on many points and it does apply to BD culture as well.

Zeeshan
March 7, 2012, 05:59 PM
Okay which one is Greg Chappell? I get confused with Ian Chappell and then there is Tony Greg. Damnnn!! :hairpull:

TigerEz
March 7, 2012, 06:00 PM
i knew the main problem is our culture.....

cricheart
March 7, 2012, 07:33 PM
He been coach for India for long 2 years & got out with success. So he knows Indian team very well. Gregs staements are all about Dhoni's intension on quitting test captaincy / test cricket where Greg dont see anyone alter of him. Thats why culture part came when he is working on reasoning.
Book concludes with his worriness for dark future of test cricket.

zsayeed
March 7, 2012, 07:43 PM
Okay which one is Greg Chappell? I get confused with Ian Chappell and then there is Tony Greg. Damnnn!! :hairpull:

Jee bhai, sorry Zee bhai,
Coincidentally CI has exactly that kind of analysis:

Ian v Greg at the Chappell backyard
http://blogs.espncricinfo.com/tourdiaries/archives/2012/03/ian_v_greg_at_t.php

firstlane
March 7, 2012, 09:18 PM
Heres the article from Cricinfo. Monga doesn't say anything about attacking. But effigies would be burnt I could imagine.


Sidharth Monga in Adelaide
March 7, 2012

Greg Chappell, India's former coach, has said that India "weren't really interested in Test cricket" on their tour to Australia, and that "Test cricket is pretty tough for them". Chappell was speaking at a promotional event for his book, Fierce Focus, at Adelaide Writers Week. It was an interaction full of endearing anecdotes about his playing days until a member of the audience - which might have been close to 200-strong - asked him about India's apparent disinterest in Test cricket, and how it might adversely affect Test cricket overall, considering how the BCCI controls cricket today.

"It was obvious from the start of the tour that the Indians weren't really interested in Test cricket," Chappell said. "After the Australians showed that they were going to be a formidable foe, I was very disappointed with the Indians. And having worked with many of them and having been in the dressing room with them, Test cricket was too hard for most of them. They can only make a lot of money playing 20-over cricket. Fifty-over cricket they can sort of put up with.

"Test cricket for a lot of, not only India, a lot of subcontinent teams, I think it's pretty tough. And the challenge for Test cricket is, without the sort of grounding that we [Australians] had as kids, Test cricket is too hard. It's very demanding mentally, physically and emotionally."

Malcolm Knox, Chappell's co-writer, then brought the discussion back to the book, and pointed out how Chappell had marked out Virender Sehwag's fitness and attitude and Zaheer Khan's fitness as key issues for India. "You can throw in attitude for Zaheer as well," Chappell interjected.

Chappell then spoke about what was wrong with the Indian culture. "The culture is very different, it's not a team culture," Chappell said. "They lack leaders in the team because they are not trained to be leaders. From an early age, their parents make all the decisions, their schoolteachers make their decisions, their cricket coaches make the decisions.

"The culture of India is such that, if you put your head above the parapet someone will shoot it. Knock your head off. So they learn to keep their head down and not take responsibility. The Poms (British) taught them really well to keep their head down. For if someone was deemed to be responsible, they'd get punished. So the Indians have learned to avoid responsibility. So before taking responsibility for any decisions, they prefer not to."

Chappell said MS Dhoni the Indian captain, was one exception to that rule, but even he seems to have lost to the system. When asked if any Indian captain, when on 329 not out himself, would have declared the innings, Chappell said: "If MS Dhoni would have ever got to 329 in a Test match, he probably would. Look, Dhoni is one of the most impressive young men that I have ever worked with. When he came into that Indian team, you just knew that he was a leader in the making. He was definitely someone who could make decisions, and he didn't mind putting his head above the parapet, and didn't mind putting the bigger players in their place. I think he is the best thing to have happened to Indian cricket in recent times.

"But looking at him on this tour - I didn't meet or speak to him at all - but just watching the body language and just watching him on the field, it wasn't the MS Dhoni that I knew. I think Indian cricket has worn him down as well. Especially captaining all three formats, and India plays about 50% more cricket than Australia does. And Dhoni played four years, captaining three years while being wicketkeeper and their key batman - one of the best chasers of a target that I've ever seen. Very confident, very un-Indian in that regard. There was no false modesty about him. If he thought he could do something, he would take responsibility and say 'I can do that.'"

Chappell also felt Sehwag's captaincy ambition hurt the Indian team. "Sehwag thought he should be captain after [Anil] Kumble, so there is a bit of a collision there," he said. "I think Dhoni is getting to a point where Test cricket is getting too hard for him, and the undercurrent around the dressing room cannot help."

Chappell said that Test cricket needed a strong India. "I think Australia and England will always look at Test cricket and try and preserve it," Chappell said. "South Africa to a lesser degree. Up until this summer I thought India as well. We probably had four major Test-playing countries, and the others would play Test cricket spasmodically.

"Because firstly most countries haven't got the critical mass of players to develop Test cricketers and most of them don't have the money. Cricket Australia probably spends in excess of 20 million dollars a year in development programmes, which includes first-class cricket - huge investment to develop a Test team. I am not sure many other countries have the will to do that. If the financial circumstances change for Australian cricket, it will be very tough for Australian cricket too.

"If of the three formats, one of them is under pressure, it's Test cricket. In ten years' time, it might look very different from the way it looks today. And for those who have grown up with Test cricket and hold it in high stead, we are going to probably be a little bit disappointed with the way it goes in the next few years."

http://www.espncricinfo.com/india/content/current/story/556548.html

Zunaid
March 7, 2012, 09:25 PM
Heres the article from Cricinfo. Monga doesn't say anything about attacking. But effigies would be burnt I could imagine.



The article in the OP that I fund was from the Times of India. Of course, they chose to lead off with "vicious" and "attack", a defensive parry.