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View Full Version : Breaking news : Stuart law quits as bangladesh coach


banindfan
April 16, 2012, 03:19 AM
Source : espncricinfo

http://www.espncricinfo.com/bangladesh/content/story/561426.html


Stuart Law has resigned as Bangladesh coach after nine months in the job, citing family problems. His decision to quit comes less than a month after Bangladesh reached the final of the Asia Cup, widely seen as one of their finest achievements.
:flag:

Maysun
April 16, 2012, 03:20 AM
Damn, So it's official!

banindfan
April 16, 2012, 03:22 AM
Its been posted :flag: on the cricinfo headline!!

FaHiMa
April 16, 2012, 03:26 AM
Wow, can't believe it. It's official !

Naimul_Hd
April 16, 2012, 03:27 AM
I guess majority of BC members should be happy to know that as 2 months back they wanted Law to resign, no !? :)

Roni_uk
April 16, 2012, 03:29 AM
Ow?

2 breaking news in 2 days -I can't take it anymore :facepalm:

amar11432
April 16, 2012, 03:33 AM
So the family problem just came up the day after the idiot kamal announces we are gona tour Pakistan? I say it's BS. It's quite obvious why he quit. Just as soon as Law starts to have a positive impact in the team...

Miraz
April 16, 2012, 03:45 AM
Ow?

2 breaking news in 2 days -I can't take it anymore :facepalm:

I will not be surprised if the two breaking news are related.

Now Lotus Kamal should complete the full circle and become the coach of Bangladesh as well. It will be helpful as after his role as BCB president and selector, he will be the coach. Good for consistency.

Crickbang
April 16, 2012, 03:49 AM
Ok so what does the short list look like this time for a HC? I mean I am pretty sure Law won't be going to Pakistan so basically we should start the head coach search right now. And who could be the interim guy for the next 3-6 months while we hire a new head coach. It's gonna be a bumpy and painful ride (this head coach hire I mean).

kalpurush
April 16, 2012, 03:54 AM
Sad to see Law is leaving.

All the best Law and thank you for your time in Bangladesh :)

Rifat H
April 16, 2012, 03:56 AM
Now bring jammie siddons back
<br />Posted via BC Mobile Edition (Opera Mobile)

Zunaid
April 16, 2012, 04:00 AM
BCB Press Release on Stuart Law's Resignation

Monday, 16 April 2012
Media Release
Stuart Law steps down as Bangladesh Head Coach
Bangladesh National Team Head Coach Stuart Law announced today that he was stepping down from the position. Law, who took over as Bangladesh coach from 01 July 2011, said that he was standing down due to purely personal reasons."It is with great regret and a heavy heart that today I announce my stepping down as the head coach of Bangladesh. Firstly I would like to thank the BCB, the Board Directors and all the workers who have made my stay here very enjoyable. I am grateful for this opportunity because without this I wouldn’t have gained the experience that I did and to finish it off with almost winning the Asia Cup was very good sign that the Bangladesh cricket team is going the right way.

"It is personal reason as to why I am standing down. Living away from the family and not seeing people growing up, I think we all understand that family comes first. Cricket has been a huge part of my life but over the years I have realised that there is nothing more important than the family and if they are not happy then I am not happy and something had to give. So unfortunately I have to stand down for those reasons.
"This has nothing to do with anyone in the cricket fraternity in Bangladesh. I have really enjoyed my time here. It has been a fantastic period for me. I have learned a lot about cricket and the culture here. I have learned a lot about the people here and I’ll go away from this place having made extremely great friends and lots of friendship that will continue on for ever and ever.
"As I have said it was very difficult but it was a decision I had to make."

BCB Media Commitee Chairman Jalal Yunus said that the Board was saddened by the announcement but understood Law's position.

"As he (Law) has said the family was his priority and that should be the case for all of us. We are sorry to see him go, especially at a time when under his guidence the Bangladesh team is doing really well and showing good consistency. We wish him all the best."

Law wil continue with the Bangladesh team until the end of his contract which expires on 30 June 2012.

"We would have loved to see Stuart continue with the Bangladesh side but we respect his decision. We would like to thank him for his conribution to Bangladesh cricket. The team has shown a marked improvement and he deservs a lot of credit for that. We will start the procedure for a new head coach appointment soon," said BCB Cricket Operations Committee Chairman Enayet Husain Siraj.

Miraz
April 16, 2012, 04:05 AM
Now that's odd. His contract expires in June 2013, not in 2012. Not sure about this statement "Law wil continue with the Bangladesh team until the end of his contract which expires on 30 June 2012".

Anyway good luck Sturat. It would be interesting to see whether he goes to Pakistan which I am quite sure he won't and this played a big part in his decision.

yaseer
April 16, 2012, 04:11 AM
If Law does not go to Pakistan with the team, then the reason of his resignation will be clear.
I have a feeling Bangladesh touring Pakistan has something to do with his decision. Lets see whether he goes to Pakistan.

FaHiMa
April 16, 2012, 04:16 AM
If he's staying till June, he has to go Pak...unless Pak was the reason for his resignation. If it isn't then family does come first. All the best, Stuart Law!

MohammedC
April 16, 2012, 04:49 AM
Now bring jammie siddons back
<br />Posted via BC Mobile Edition (Opera Mobile)

At least he wanted to stay.

MohammedC
April 16, 2012, 04:59 AM
Upcoming Prediction: BCB has found an excuse for loosing the test series against Zimbabwe.

kalpurush
April 16, 2012, 05:01 AM
At least he wanted to stay.
knock knock...
who is there?
i am rock
rok who?
...

kalpurush
April 16, 2012, 05:15 AM
Bangladesh news

Tamim 'completely surprised' by Law decision

Nagraj Gollapudi
April 16, 2012
Be the first to comment (http://www.espncricinfo.com/bangladesh/content/current/story/561441.html#fcomments) | Login via (http://www.espncricinfo.com/bangladesh/content/current/story/561441.html#fcomments) http://i.imgci.com/espncricinfo/connect_fb_icon.png (http://www.espncricinfo.com/bangladesh/content/current/story/561441.html#fcomments) | Text size: A | A

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<TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD class=stryPicCptn id=stryPicCptn>Tamim Iqbal: "This is the tragedy with Bangladesh cricket: whenever we do something good, something bad happens" <NOBR>© Associated Press </NOBR>

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-->News : Stuart Law quits as Bangladesh coach (http://www.espncricinfo.com/bangladesh/content/story/561426.html)

<!--
-->Players/Officials: Stuart Law (http://www.espncricinfo.com/bangladesh/content/player/6274.html) | Tamim Iqbal (http://www.espncricinfo.com/bangladesh/content/player/56194.html)
Teams: Bangladesh (http://www.espncricinfo.com/bangladesh/content/team/25.html)





</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>Tamim Iqbal (http://www.espncricinfo.com/bangladesh/content/player/56194.html), one of Bangladesh's senior players, has said he had no idea that the national coach Stuart Law (http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/player/6274.html) was going to resign. He was talking hours after Law announced his decision to quit as Bangladesh coach.
"I'm completely taken by surprise," Tamim told ESPNcricinfo. "But family comes first." Law was stepping down less than a month after guiding Bangladesh to the final of the Asia Cup.
Tamim said Law had added to the professionalism brought in by his predecessors as coach, the Australian pair of Dav Whatmore and Jamie Siddons. "Law gave us the belief that we can do it," Tamim said. "And that only pumped up the players. He used to give us tremendous amount of confidence. A team like us needs the confidence and he always supported us.
"The relationship between a coach and the players takes time to develop usually and with Stuey, we were almost there. Everyone was enjoying his presence in the dressing room and he was enjoying being with us as well."
Tamim also gave a personal example of Law's influence. "When I was going through a rough patch during the Pakistan series (last December) he kept pushing me to work hard. There is one line I can never forget. He said: 'Someone is hurt now and someone will be hurt in the Asia Cup.'" Tamim made four half-centuries in four matches in the Asia Cup and finished as the second-highest run-maker (http://stats.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/records/batting/most_runs_career.html?id=6730;type=tournament) in the tournament.
Tamim said he was also disappointed as he felt Law's departure was a bit of a backward step for Bangladesh cricket. "We will miss him definitely. This is the tragedy with Bangladesh cricket: whenever we do something good, something bad happens."
<SMALL>Edited by Siddarth Ravindran</SMALL>

<!-- body area ends here -->Nagraj Gollapudi is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo
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http://www.espncricinfo.com/bangladesh/content/current/story/561441.html
Source:

MohammedC
April 16, 2012, 05:27 AM
knock knock...
who is there?
i am rock
rok who?
...

I did not know Rock wanted to become Head Coach of Bangladesh

Tiger-ess
April 16, 2012, 05:33 AM
No more Australian coaches please, thanks.

kalpurush
April 16, 2012, 05:36 AM
I did not know Rock wanted to become Head Coach of Bangladesh
Some one was remembering Siddons!;)



I am a Siddons fan though.

kalpurush
April 16, 2012, 05:38 AM
No more Australian coaches please, thanks.
Why not??

Because of the cost?
Or, they are the tough to handle for the BCB politician/s?

MSM B2C
April 16, 2012, 05:53 AM
Breaking news: very sad to see him go, I guess I had the final say, haha:)

Sad part is he was doing well and as soon as I was about to change my mind, his a gooner.

simon
April 16, 2012, 06:06 AM
I'm not a Law fan as much as I was about Jomie Shudhon but it feels bad because we just had our best Asia cup,things were looking good for BD to take it further from there, it looked like the understanding between the players and coach had reached to a certain level from where we could really move forward. :(
Anyway, take care S.LAw,good luck to you and your family & thanks for your contribution.

Now bring JS back. :E

shakibrulz
April 16, 2012, 06:27 AM
Was doing well, quite a loss this. I hope the replacement turns out to be as good.

akabir77
April 16, 2012, 06:30 AM
So should we go for our bv local boy? He already have some relations with players and gave Dhaka the BPL title. And most of all made ash some what consistent. Not a bad choice in the short notice?

Tiger444
April 16, 2012, 07:36 AM
Sad to see Law going. Just when the team started to get comfortable with him, he has to go now. I wish him and his family the best and wish him the best in his future. He seems to have a bright future as a coach and will do well wherever he goes.

I hope BCB takes their time now and pick a head coach that'll fit well with our team.

patriot
April 16, 2012, 07:48 AM
Dean Jones ‏ @ProfDeano

"Yes the Bangladesh Cricket Board has asked me if I would be interested to coach the national team.. Considering options "

No thanks , this guy should be the last person to coach Bangladesh.

MohammedC
April 16, 2012, 08:00 AM
No thanks , this guy should be the last person to coach Bangladesh.

If he becomes our coach. Huzur Shuvo will never ever play for Bangladesh.

Tigers_eye
April 16, 2012, 08:19 AM
One must follow the heart. Best wishes to S Law. Next stop should be KKR.

Jadukor
April 16, 2012, 08:28 AM
I can't believe the reason behind him quitting is Family... He knew the circumstances before he signed on. It has to be the Pakistan tour that broke the deal for him. Kamal perhaps put immense pressure on him to go with the team and this is probably the result. It's all my speculation though and i do not have any sources to back up my theory.

firstlane
April 16, 2012, 08:29 AM
wow! a lot of accolade from Tamim. Makes it more interesting the fact that not too long ago him and Shakib were strongly advocating for Siddons. Law must have done something to win their hearts, at least ashraful's at the beginning.

mufi_02
April 16, 2012, 08:29 AM
In 2 days world cricket news is dominated by us. And we are not even playing.

Best of luck to Stuart Law. Will Ian apply for HC position now?

Rabz
April 16, 2012, 08:38 AM
Sad indeed.
Just when he was looking good.
Can't help but remember LBW today.
He must be over the moon !!

Jokes apart, best of luck to Mr Law.
Thank you for your service.
Under your guidance, we have achieved our best result so far.

firstlane
April 16, 2012, 08:38 AM
If he becomes our coach. Huzur Shuvo will never ever play for Bangladesh.

Add Tamim to that list as well. this guy is extremely outspoken and posses strong opinions on what he believes, not diplomatic at all. not sure how suitable he will be for BD.

Rubu
April 16, 2012, 08:39 AM
Is it official official, or there is a chance that if Loitta goes, he stays? In that case, we should start an online petition or some sort of movement to do that.

simon
April 16, 2012, 08:39 AM
wow! a lot of accolade from Tamim. Makes it more interesting the fact that not too long ago him and Shakib were strongly advocating for Siddons. Law must have done something to win their hearts, at least ashraful's at the beginning.

and also there were rumeurs that Tamim and Law had issues :rolleyes:

firstlane
April 16, 2012, 08:44 AM
and also there were rumeurs that Tamim and Law had issues :rolleyes:

Tamim's appraisal makes it even more interesting. He must have done something after that incident to gain Tamim's trust. this is the second time Tamim has given some credit to Law since Asia cup.

Rabz
April 16, 2012, 08:46 AM
and also there were rumeurs that Tamim and Law had issues :rolleyes:

Probably they had issues at the beginning.

MohammedC
April 16, 2012, 08:49 AM
Is it official official, or there is a chance that if Loitta goes, he stays? In that case, we should start an online petition or some sort of movement to do that.

Looks like

http://www.banglanews24.com/images/PhotoGallery/2012April/BCB_262920120416164009.jpg

Rubu
April 16, 2012, 08:53 AM
Looks like

http://www.banglanews24.com/images/PhotoGallery/2012April/BCB_262920120416164009.jpg
I know it is official, what I meant is, is it reversible or not. If Loitta goes, will he be willing to reverse his decision?

I think he will.

MohammedC
April 16, 2012, 08:57 AM
I know it is official, what I meant is, is it reversible or not. If Loitta goes, will he be willing to reverse his decision?

I think he will.

Loitta himself is reversible as proven with regards "To Tour or Not To Tour Pakistan".

zsayeed
April 16, 2012, 09:18 AM
knock knock...
who is there?
i am rock
rok who?
...

...A rolling Rok gathers no match

(sorry MoC Bhai, no disrespect :))

al-Sagar
April 16, 2012, 09:27 AM
good luck for LAW. thanks for all the contribution

time to move on with somebody else

MohammedC
April 16, 2012, 09:34 AM
<iframe width="640" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/-o113TRZ1ks" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

betaar
April 16, 2012, 09:54 AM
I can't believe the reason behind him quitting is Family... He knew the circumstances before he signed on. It has to be the Pakistan tour that broke the deal for him. Kamal perhaps put immense pressure on him to go with the team and this is probably the result. It's all my speculation though and i do not have any sources to back up my theory.

Yes he did but that does not mean his love for his family will stay stand still. It's one thing to make a decision after assessing situations and another to actually live through it. His family could well be missing him now after 2.5 years to put enough pressure on him to make this decision or he could realize it himself. After all, 2.5 years away from family could surely take its toll. Unfortunately BD isn't the place where westerners would feel at ease to bring there family and continue their career.

betaar
April 16, 2012, 10:04 AM
wow! a lot of accolade from Tamim. Makes it more interesting the fact that not too long ago him and Shakib were strongly advocating for Siddons. Law must have done something to win their hearts, at least ashraful's at the beginning.

Or Tamim may be either diplomatic about his statement or just saying positive stuff now that Law is leaving.

oronnya
April 16, 2012, 10:11 AM
The moment our team started to look good he had to go :( .. He looked more involved with the team in the last few months and had a very good influence on the team.. Allah knows what will happen now..

I have this feelings that he was having issues with the board.. He never wanted to travel to Pak as per some previous reports.

Anyways, he did well with the boys at the end.. So Thank you Law, we will miss you..

roman
April 16, 2012, 10:25 AM
Our fielding coach is a friend of Law. is he is leaving too?

mufi_02
April 16, 2012, 10:28 AM
^^ Jhorna bhai o ar available nai. Swift chole gele ar kake nibo?

zinatf
April 16, 2012, 10:57 AM
This is what Law's gonna do now

Law to leave Bangladesh for academy role
Jesse Hogan
April 17, 2012


DECORATED former Queensland batsman Stuart Law has shelved his immediate international coaching career to return to Australia in a key development role.

Law yesterday announced he was quitting as head coach of Bangladesh for family reasons. When he returns in July to Australia to live in Australia - after an eight-year stint in England and the subcontinent - The Age believes he is set to become the new deputy to Centre of Excellence head coach Troy Cooley.

The 44-year-old's tenure at the helm of Bangladesh began in July last year and was said to be on a two-year term.

It included leading the Tigers to the final of the Asia Cup ODI tournament last month, where it narrowly lost to Pakistan.

Law yesterday announced his resignation, "with great regret and a heavy heart".

His decision shocked the Bangladesh Cricket Board, although a spokesman told ESPNcricinfo said its disappointment was tempered by the understanding he was prioritising his family.

Law, a long-time captain of Queensland, played one Test and 54 ODIs for Australia as a batsman between 1994 and 1999. He has not lived in Australia since early 2004, when he ended his first-class career here after the Bulls' Sheffield Shield final loss to Victoria.

Since then, he and his family have predominantly lived in England, where his wife was born, as he concluded his playing career in the county system.

He also had a stint on the coaching staff of Sri Lanka, including as its caretaker head coach, but quit and moved to Bangladesh when Sri Lanka's board dithered over making a full-time appointment.

Cricket Australia has been very interested in appointing Law. His decision to return to his home city of Brisbane is timely, and his mooted position would be at the renamed cricket academy at Allan Border Field rather than CA headquarters in Melbourne.

Meanwhile, Bangladesh's decision to participate in a lightning tour of Pakistan next month will not increase the possibility of Australia playing in the unsettled country later this year.

The Asian nations' cricket boards have agreed to play two matches in Lahore: an ODI on April 29 and a Twenty20 International the following day.

The matches will be the first internationals played in Pakistan since Sri Lanka's players were injured in an attack by terrorist gunmen in March 2009. Since then, all of Pakistan's designated home series have been played at neutral venues.

Pakistan is designated to host Australia for a limited-overs series - likely five ODIs and a T20I - from late August.

Source: http://www.smh.com.au/sport/cricket/law-to-leave-bangladesh-for-academy-role-20120416-1x3zg.html

Dilscoop
April 16, 2012, 10:57 AM
That poll thread. That's why he's leaving. Simple

Dilscoop
April 16, 2012, 11:02 AM
If he ends up noy touring pak, then I do believe it has to do with kamal. Because the while rumor started when the Oak tour deal was in talk. Obviously it was "you stop or I quit." And he can't say it out loud, that will just get him in trouble.

I hope once he goes home he reveals the truth. Unmask everything.

jisaan
April 16, 2012, 12:10 PM
thanks for your contribution mr. Law!
best of luck!!

Murad
April 16, 2012, 01:10 PM
Shob kisu te Kamal ke blame na korle hoi na?

Equinox
April 16, 2012, 01:11 PM
Wow so Law left a international HC job to go and become deputy head of the Aus academy. Jamie became coach of one of the bottom-ranked NZ domestic teams. And Whatmore got rejected by India and Pakistan and had to settle for being head of the Indian academy immediately after leaving us. Just shows how the rest of the world values coaching Bangladesh.

WarWolf
April 16, 2012, 02:45 PM
A big percentage of people here should be reasonably happy now as they had been complaining about Law from the very start as he doesn't talk much.

It's a sad day for me. I liked Law from the very start. Best wishes for him.

zsayeed
April 16, 2012, 02:54 PM
Wow so Law left a international HC job to go and become deputy head of the Aus academy. Jamie became coach of one of the bottom-ranked NZ domestic teams. And Whatmore got rejected by India and Pakistan and had to settle for being head of the Indian academy immediately after leaving us. Just shows how the rest of the world values coaching Bangladesh.

Seems like a death knell for any coach!
Buyer Beware!

Tiger444
April 16, 2012, 02:56 PM
‘I will miss them a hell of a lot’

Stuart Law resigned as the head coach of Bangladesh after being with the team for nine months on Monday. The Australian talks to the media about the reasons behind his decision and what he is taking back with him from Bangladesh.
Q: When did you decide that you will leave?
Law: It wasn’t decided on the spot. It took a lot of consideration and to-ing and fro-ing in my mind to come to the decision. I didn’t want to go, but once family matters start cropping up, family comes first and that’s what I’ve done.
Q: Feel unfulfilled as a coach because just when things seemed to fall into places you are leaving?
Law: We were just sitting in there with the cricket that is scheduled for next few months. It is an exciting times for Bangladesh. The boys will play tough games of cricket in different parts of the world where they probably haven’t seen before. That is going to be a fantastic learning curve for them, not only cricket-wise but see what the world has to offer. We have put some things in place, but unfortunately I won’t be there. Sometimes these things can’t be helped.
Q: How was the journey since the Zimbabwe tour to Asia Cup?
Law: As a coach you’re not going to walk in and have success immediately. You have to work out how the players respond in certain pressure situations. You have to work out how to treat them, you can’t treat everybody the same. It is totally different than how you treat people in other parts of the world. I think to gain trust between me and the players; there were a lot of things, not just one or two. But it is disappointing now that since we started to see the plans come into fruition, what we talk about being acted out in the field. The boys are listening and responding and respecting the way we are talking about our cricket.
Q: What would be your message to the boys?
Law: As I have always said, near enough is not good enough. You’re never good enough. You always try to be the best you possibly can. I will miss them a hell of a lot and I wish them all the best, but there’s no substitute for hard work.
Q: Is this a group that can be continued with?
Law: It is up to them. Nothing will be handed to them on a plate. A guy like Mashrafe has gone through a lot, seven knee operations, to come this far so he knows the goodness of hard work. He’s a great example for the rest of the boys. Mushy is a fine example of a professional cricketer.
Q: More team than mere individuals?
Law: I am a firm believer that you do have your outstanding performers in the team but that can’t be the one’s you rely on all the time. At some stage they’re going to come up short so that’s when the other players should be ready to take the bull by the horns. As great a player Sakib is, I didn’t want him to be the only player making all the contributions. Sakib and Tamim are the marquee players but the other players have stuck their hand up so that’s what you want to see. I believe there’s a great depth in fast bowling there, nobody believes that. They talk about left-arm spin.
Q: Jamie gave preference to two players where as you always wanted to make it as a team. Is this your method of coaching?
Law: I’m a different personality to Jamie Siddons. The culture we created in Queensland had everyone on equal terms and it was even started to be like this when it came to payments. It was more of a family and that’s what I wanted to create here. You can break off into different groups. The way that superstars are treated in this part of the world, I’ve never seen it before outside this part of the world. To their credit, Sakib and Tamim have gone out of their zone to be part of the team. We saw the rewards of that in the Asia Cup.
Q: Will you continue coaching?
Law: It’s not a done deal for me by any stretch of the imagination. I get a buzz out of watching players replicate what we’ve been talking about. I’m moving back to Brisbane, my hometown. I have applied for a position there so I am just waiting to hear on the outcome of that.
Q: What will you take back from Bangladesh?
Law: I have never seen millions of people so that took a lot of getting used to. All I can see in the street are happy faces. I was told it is a very poor country, but I see everyone going to work happily.

http://newagebd.com/detail.php?date=2012-04-17&nid=7424

AMD128
April 16, 2012, 03:28 PM
Thank you for all the contributions Mr.Law. He is a great coach & motivator. Truly going to miss him. :(

zsayeed
April 16, 2012, 05:18 PM
http://www.kalerkantho.com/epaper/2012/04/17/newspaper/images/11_104.jpg
http://i1235.photobucket.com/albums/ff430/zsayeed/11_104.jpg

Naimul_Hd
April 16, 2012, 08:34 PM
Wow so Law left a international HC job to go and become deputy head of the Aus academy. Jamie became coach of one of the bottom-ranked NZ domestic teams. And Whatmore got rejected by India and Pakistan and had to settle for being head of the Indian academy immediately after leaving us. Just shows how the rest of the world values coaching Bangladesh.

This is not the case here mate.

He did not leave BD HC job to become deputy head coach of an academy. He's been tired of living outside of his home and family for 8 years. Now, he wants to go back to his home (Brisbane) and have a decent job there. That's why he applied for that academy job. Its not that he was more interested in that academy job than in Bangladesh.

In JS and Whatmore's case, both of their contract was expired. Now, whether they became Parar team coach or academy coach is none of our concern.

BANFAN
April 17, 2012, 03:39 AM
He could've waited until he gets a confirmation on his application for the new job ...but he didn't. What was the hurry ??

Is it the decision to tour Pakistan? ... Could be one of the underlying causes of leaving or just hastened him to this decision which was otherwise looming in his mind due to other genuine considerations... Anyway, let's see if he tours Pak at the end of this month....to talk about any link with Pak tour...

Any way, We just lost a good coach...

Shaan
April 17, 2012, 05:04 AM
(http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/current/story/561528.html)Australia news

Law takes on Centre of Excellence role

ESPNcricinfo staff
April 17, 2012
Comments: 3 (http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/current/story/561528.html#comments) | Login via (http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/current/story/561528.html#fcomments) http://i.imgci.com/espncricinfo/connect_fb_icon.png (http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/current/story/561528.html#fcomments) | Text size: A | A
<table style="margin-top:5px;" align="right" border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="320"> <tbody><tr> <td height="1" width="10">
</td> <td class="phototbl"> http://www.espncricinfo.com/db/PICTURES/CMS/135000/135061.2.jpg
<table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0"> <tbody><tr> <td class="stryPicCptn" id="stryPicCptn"> Stuart Law is looking forward to working with Australia's young cricketers <nobr> © AFP </nobr>
</td> </tr> <tr> <td class="stryEnlarge stryPicCptn"> Enlarge </td> </tr> </tbody></table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> Related Links
News : Stuart Law quits as Bangladesh coach (http://www.espncricinfo.com/bangladesh/content/story/561426.html)
Players/Officials: Stuart Law (http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/player/6274.html)
Teams: Australia (http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/team/2.html)



</td> </tr> </tbody></table> Stuart Law (http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/player/6274.html) has been confirmed as the new high performance coach of Australia's Centre of Excellence (COE). Law stepped down (http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/current/story/561426.html) from his role as coach of Bangladesh on Monday and his new position will allow him to be based in his home city of Brisbane, where he will be a key assistant to Troy Cooley, the head coach of the COE.
The high performance coach position is a new role that stemmed from the Argus review into Australia's performance. The job involves helping Cooley to provide tactical and technical support and development for Australia's cricketers in both state and national programmes, and Law said he was passionate about developing young players.
"The opportunity to return home to be closer with family and work in Brisbane with Australia's established and emerging talent was too good to pass up," Law said. "As a member of the first intake of the former Cricket Academy, I'm a passionate believer in the COE and look forward to ... [delivering] programs that will develop and prepare players for the challenge of achieving sustained international success.
Law, who played one Test and 54 ODIs for Australia, and 367 first-class matches in a career spanning 20 years, will start his new role after he completes his notice period with Bangladesh. The COE manager, Belinda Clark, said Law's experience as both a player and a coach would make him a valuable acquisition.
"Stuart is a current international coach with recent demonstrable success and we're fortunate to have secured his services in the Australian Cricket landscape," Clark said. "He has experienced success with two international teams, periods that included an ICC Cricket World Cup final appearance with Sri Lanka in 2011 and Bangladesh's first Asia Cup final last month.
"His knowledge of the sub-continent and England, and his experience with Sri Lanka and Bangladesh, will bring a global perspective to the COE."
<small>Edited by Brydon Coverdale</small>

© ESPN EMEA Ltd.

(http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/current/story/561528.html)


http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/current/story/561528.html
(http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/current/story/561528.html)

firstlane
April 17, 2012, 05:15 AM
and our Bulbul, Salauddins are serving China and Malaysian cricket. (faceplam). kothai jeno poresilam- "Je deshe guni'r kodor hoi na, se deshe guni jonmai na"

zinatf
April 17, 2012, 05:20 AM
tbh.....I want Bulbul to be assistant head coach for the national team....he'll be very valuable to the team because if a new coach comes...it will take some time for him to settle down and adjust to the Bangladesh Cricket system....with the help of Bulbul he will be very much able to achieve it....and heck...bulbul will get the experience to coach the team and will be a valuable motivator for the boys....then he can definitely be a good option to be the head coach in future :)

BANFAN
April 17, 2012, 05:40 AM
and our Bulbul, Salauddins are serving China and Malaysian cricket. (faceplam). kothai jeno poresilam- "Je deshe guni'r kodor hoi na, se deshe guni jonmai na"

Fundamentally a gulf of difference between coaching China / Malaysia and coaching Bangladesh. They are doing a great job and Bulbul could be useful with the age groups... But surely not yet for the national team.

More over, an international coach is more preferred by subcontinental teams, because a local coach comes with a lots of other biases, backgrounds, affiliations etc which are detrimental to the formation of a team united for the cause. That's the reason, teams like Ind, Pak, SL despite having many more great cricketers in their own basket, aren't opting for a local coach.

firstlane
April 17, 2012, 05:53 AM
Bulbul could be useful with the age groups

Yep. that's what I meant. We haven't produced that many qualified coaches yet so that we can let them go.

Jonas
April 18, 2012, 03:02 AM
Law chooses family, applies for a CA post
LOKENDRA PRATAP SAHI

Calcutta: Stuart Law, who’d settled in the UK after marrying an Englishwoman, is relocating to where his roots are — Queensland’s capital Brisbane.

Moreover, after deciding to resign as Bangladesh’s coach, Law has applied for a coaching position with Cricket Australia.

Law, 43, confirmed both developments in a chat (from Dhaka) with The Telegraph on Monday evening.

Such a big decision taken, he sounded relaxed.

“As I’ve mentioned in my statement, the decision to quit has wholly been for personal reasons… There’s nothing sinister… No falling out with anybody… I’ll be returning to Australia and hope to remain involved with coaching,” Law said.

He added that the Bangladesh Cricket Board had done everything to make him “feel comfortable.”

Law didn’t say so himself, but it’s learnt that his wife and young son had been absolutely put off during their trip to Bangladesh’s capital some months ago.

They were, apparently, largely confined to Law’s apartment in the upmarket Gulshan area and weren’t impressed with the traffic snarls (among the worst in the world) and the tendency of beggars to almost reach for the pockets of passers-by.

Clearly, it’s not easy for the Westerners to adjust, particularly if there’s no social life, except for interacting with the diplomatic corps.

If a source is to be believed, so “distressed” was Law’s wife that she vowed never to return.

Sooner rather than later, then, the former Australia player had to take a decision. He did so a fortnight ago, even though the announcement was made this afternoon.

As the forthcoming tour of Pakistan falls in Law’s notice period, he’ll be travelling to Lahore with the team.

It was in Law’s tenure, of less than a year, that Bangladesh upset world champions India in the Asia Cup and went on to make the final of the tournament.

Law has strong reasons for leaving, but it has put his employers in somewhat of a fix.

Source (http://www.telegraphindia.com/1120417/jsp/sports/story_15383362.jsp#.T45ztnnxLIU)

BengaliPagol
April 18, 2012, 04:08 AM
Its difficult for families who havent been to this part of this world to adjust. I dont see how people would adjust. It would be hard to go outside and have a good time. They would have to stay in their house all day which is a boring life.

Nafi
April 18, 2012, 04:14 AM
If a source is to be believed, so “distressed” was Law’s wife that she vowed never to return.

I dont blame her

Navo
April 18, 2012, 09:23 AM
How did Law and his family not know that Dhaka would be like this when he signed his employment contract? I think Law has been to Bangladesh before and I'm sure he spoke to some of his Australian friends who have been to BD, before he signed the contract.

Vagaries in surroundings and circumstances should be expected if you are an international coach. It's part and parcel of the gig. Is the situation in Pakistan, with their prohibitions on drinking, the constant threat of terrorism, institutionalized corruption, poor infrastructure, etc any better? Sri Lanka was undergoing civil war till relatively recently. The list goes on. Did that prevent international coaches from fulfilling the terms of their contracts? You shouldn't sign up for the job if you think you can't handle the ancillary conditions.

Dhakablues
April 18, 2012, 10:35 AM
How did Law and his family not know that Dhaka would be like this when he signed his employment contract? I think Law has been to Bangladesh before and I'm sure he spoke to some of his Australian friends who have been to BD, before he signed the contract.

Vagaries in surroundings and circumstances should be expected if you are an international coach. It's part and parcel of the gig. Is the situation in Pakistan, with their prohibitions on drinking, the constant threat of terrorism, institutionalized corruption, poor infrastructure, etc any better? Sri Lanka was undergoing civil war till relatively recently. The list goes on. Did that prevent international coaches from fulfilling the terms of their contracts? You shouldn't sign up for the job if you think you can't handle the ancillary conditions.

I think she or the family thought Bangladesh is just like India or Sri Lanka.. and if you take out the street conditions of Dhaka, it mostly is. But honestly, Dhaka is where all the cricketing is happening and where most of the international matches take place and it is the ABSOLUTELY MOST ridiculous city in the world with traffic jams, electricity+water+gas+chaos crisis that you would not see in India or Sri Lanka or Pakistan or Nepal or even Bhutan for that matter. ts not about the prohibition of drinking ( that India, Sri Lana doesnt have) or the war ( that was taking place outside of Colombo), its the ability to at least move around the city or do something other than being confined. For foreigners, you are literally confined within one street of Gulshan, 3 major hotels and 2 international clubs and that's not life..The locals can get away with it because they are used to it ( to a certain extent) but for anyone coming from overseas ( even India), Dhaka is not a livable city. Not everyone would be willing to deal with the Dhaka chaos as Siddons or Watmore did... consider carefully, other Aussie coaches also did leave Dhaka for one reason or the other within a year or two!!

Rabz
April 18, 2012, 10:54 AM
Not that Dhaka's traffic and living condition is any good, but it is just yet another propaganda spread by indian newspaper to belittle Bangladesh. They won't let go any single chance.
As if India is the world of richie rich and they dont have beggers reaching out to the pockets of the foreigners.

Pathetic reporting.

It is just a smear campaign to discourage the prospective coaches to think twice about coming to Bangladesh.

Areh, khut chitaile kauwar obhbhabh hoy na.

Navo
April 18, 2012, 11:36 AM
it is the ABSOLUTELY MOST ridiculous city in the world with traffic jams, electricity+water+gas+chaos crisis that you would not see in India or Sri Lanka or Pakistan or Nepal or even Bhutan for that matter.

I think the threat of terrorism in countries like Pakistan and the possibility of being attacked by the LTTE while traveling to different cities in SL trumps the inconvenience of traffic jams. Tbh, from personal experience, the traffic in Mumbai and Kolkata during rush hour is not all that different from the traffic in Dhaka and the infrastructural problems of Pakistan (i.e. electricity, gas, water, etc.) is far worse than the ones we face. Additionally, in their upscale flat in Gulshan, I imagine they have generators and what not to alleviate the aforementioned inconveniences.

A diplomat or businessman would rarely be allowed to return to their home country just because their family found it tough to live in Bangladesh. I don't see why a well paid international coach should be. (I'm not only talking about Law's own contract, which apparently expires in the summer but any coach we hire)

Shubho
April 18, 2012, 11:54 AM
It pains me to say so, but if I were a Westerner, I would live in Mumbai, Delhi, Kolkata, Bangalore, Hyderabad, Chandigarh, Chennai or Colombo, no questions asked. Dhaka is a different ball of wax altogether. In India and Sri Lanka there's a life outside of the home. In Dhaka, not so much. Westerners want more out of life than going to dinner parties at the homes of rich socialites in Gulshan, Banani and Baridhara. They don't particularly like a thousand limbless street urchins banging on their car window asking for 10 taka, all while brandishing their physical deformities. And yes, there are traffic jams in the rest of the Subcontinent, but Dhaka takes the cake!

mufi_02
April 18, 2012, 12:01 PM
Is Dhaka that bad nowadays? Last time I visited, it wasn't as bad as people are describing now. Well, I mean there was the usual traffic jams and other probs. Kintu ekhon shobar kotha shune mone hoitase aro onek onek kharap hoye gese.

The article seems very harsh. And here I am thinking about moving to Dhaka somewhere in future.

BANFAN
April 18, 2012, 01:29 PM
It pains me to say so, but if I were a Westerner, I would live in Mumbai, Delhi, Kolkata, Bangalore, Hyderabad, Chandigarh, Chennai or Colombo, no questions asked. Dhaka is a different ball of wax altogether. In India and Sri Lanka there's a life outside of the home. In Dhaka, not so much. Westerners want more out of life than going to dinner parties at the homes of rich socialites in Gulshan, Banani and Baridhara. They don't particularly like a thousand limbless street urchins banging on their car window asking for 10 taka, all while brandishing their physical deformities. And yes, there are traffic jams in the rest of the Subcontinent, but Dhaka takes the cake!

have they fixed a rate already ...?? @ 10 Taka ??

Well, i think you are being unfair...except Mumbai and Delhi.... I don't think that any of the other cities that you mentioned can ,atch Dhaka in it's life style. Well... Apart from girls/discos/sex... Dhaka is one of the best in south Asia. Traffic Jams..? Its there more or less every where ...in Every big cities of south Asia in peak time.

There are many things in Dhaka that you may not know, as that's in the Dark. Only comes out on 'need to know' basis ..;)

Night_wolf
April 18, 2012, 01:35 PM
Is Dhaka that bad nowadays? Last time I visited, it wasn't as bad as people are describing now. Well, I mean there was the usual traffic jams and other probs. Kintu ekhon shobar kotha shune mone hoitase aro onek onek kharap hoye gese.

The article seems very harsh. And here I am thinking about moving to Dhaka somewhere in future.

*14-16 ghonta current thake 8-10 ghonta thakena
*10Km jabar jonne basa theke at least der ghonta age ber hote hoy
*Manuser chape pisto sohor e kothao santite dom felar jayga nai
*Ase paser sob gula nodi bisakto hoye gese
*joto na kajer manus tar theke vhikhuk besi r most of the time tara vikha chay na demand kore

Ian Pont
April 18, 2012, 01:38 PM
Is Dhaka that bad nowadays? Last time I visited, it wasn't as bad as people are describing now. Well, I mean there was the usual traffic jams and other probs. Kintu ekhon shobar kotha shune mone hoitase aro onek onek kharap hoye gese.

The article seems very harsh. And here I am thinking about moving to Dhaka somewhere in future.

I can add that living in Dhaka is an enriching experience. I never found it distressing or awful. It depends what end you come from this at. It is not easy to understand all the staring or get the mad traffic, but the people are warm and friendly.

People have great humour and it pays to smile a great deal and laugh. Dhaka is an assault on the senses; sights, sounds, smells and it is not what you would understand if you come from Europe.

I never felt at risk, unlike in some parts of the world and even the UK.

I feel Dhaka is what you make it. It's all about perspective...

MohammedC
April 18, 2012, 01:41 PM
I can add that living in Dhaka is an enriching experience. I never found it distressing or awful. It depends what end you come from this at. It is not easy to understand all the staring or get the mad traffic, but the people are warm and friendly.

People have great humour and it pays to smile a great deal and laugh. Dhaka is an assault on the senses; sights, sounds, smells and it is not what you would understand if you come from Europe.

I never felt at risk, unlike in some parts of the world and even the UK.

I feel Dhaka is what you make it. It's all about perspective...

Can I change my vote from 50:50 to "Yes". I want Mr Ian Pont as our Head Coach.

mufi_02
April 18, 2012, 01:55 PM
Thanks Ian for your perspective. Its good to know from a Westerner's point of view. Dhakaiyas such as me and others would have been biased.

@Nekre, all that you mentioned is nothing new except maybe the electricity. I remember 2-3 hours daily but I admit that 9-10 hours is too much. I never lived in posh areas such as Gulshan, Banani. Ami Mirpuer er chipa te boro hoisi. Bashar shamne chilo pocha doba, rater bela moshar utpat, bristi hoile sewerage break hoiya baje jinish ber hoye ashto. Roof had no grill and we won't go too near the edge. But for some reason, I still miss it. Maybe its the nostalgia.

roman
April 18, 2012, 02:01 PM
Ashole Dhaka te beggers ekta severe problem. Ami Garir janala khola rakhte partam na ei begger/hawker der utpate jokhon last Dhakay gesilam..I also heard the beggers carry bag full of you know what with them and the beggers intimidate people to give money. Abar keu keu Chaabi diye gari te scratch mare vikkha na paile. So pathetic..

And the traffic is horrendous. It used to take me 2-3 hours to go to Dhanmondi from Basundhara. You can survive without electricity for few hours as most houses in Dhaka have generator nowadays..But like Banfan vai said you need to know "someone" to have good time in Dhaka.

roman
April 18, 2012, 02:04 PM
Can I change my vote from 50:50 to "Yes". I want Mr Ian Pont as our Head Coach.
Me too :)

Night_wolf
April 18, 2012, 02:36 PM
Thanks Ian for your perspective. Its good to know from a Westerner's point of view. Dhakaiyas such as me and others would have been biased.

@Nekre, all that you mentioned is nothing new except maybe the electricity. I remember 2-3 hours daily but I admit that 9-10 hours is too much. I never lived in posh areas such as Gulshan, Banani. Ami Mirpuer er chipa te boro hoisi. Bashar shamne chilo pocha doba, rater bela moshar utpat, bristi hoile sewerage break hoiya baje jinish ber hoye ashto. Roof had no grill and we won't go too near the edge. But for some reason, I still miss it. Maybe its the nostalgia.

apni ja somosha dakhe giyechilen ta akhon 4 gun bere geche electricity problem er more

amar dik theke ami bolchi a sohortar traffic,current problem r matra otirikto manus er chape amar dom bondo hoye jache..proyojoner tulonay 4 gun besi manus bas kore ai sohore, er sathe to Bhasoman manus ache aro koto ke jane, ami jokhon college e portam tokhono ai obosta chilona..tokhono mirpur ta ontoto onek chim cham chilo...akhon mirpur o manuser chape pistho, ami dhakar baire akta valo job pele seta jekhanei hok dinajpur,rongpur,feni,x,y,z bindumatro chinta na kore dour dibo..i am totally fed up with dhaka...i have been to every other district city and every one of them are 1000 times better then dhaka

mufi_02
April 18, 2012, 02:44 PM
apni ja somosha dakhe giyechilen ta akhon 4 gun bere geche electricity problem er more

amar dik theke ami bolchi a sohortar traffic,current problem r matra otirikto manus er chape amar dom bondo hoye jache..proyojoner tulonay 4 gun besi manus bas kore ai sohore, er sathe to Bhasoman manus ache aro koto ke jane, ami jokhon college e portam tokhono ai obosta chilona..tokhono mirpur ta ontoto onek chim cham chilo...akhon mirpur o manuser chape pistho, ami dhakar baire akta valo job pele seta jekhanei hok dinajpur,rongpur,feni,x,y,z bindumatro chinta na kore dour dibo..i am totally fed up with dhaka...i have been to every other district city and every one of them are 1000 times better then dhaka

Its not only you but all my friends and cousins back in Dhaka says the same thing. Its really unfortunate to see the gradual decline of an once great city. I visited other mofosshol cities of BD and they are indeed much much better than Dhaka. But on the other hand, a lot of my other relatives will grind in Dhaka and continue to struggle because of the so called better schooling for their children and hospitals for them. People do wanna move out but for some reasons are held back too.

If I were you, I would also get fed up and would want to move out. Maybe the salary and benefits would be less but it will surely make up for healthier and less stressful daily life. Anyway, all the best to your job search outside of the city :)

Night_wolf
April 18, 2012, 02:48 PM
Its not only you but all my friends and cousins back in Dhaka says the same thing. Its really unfortunate to see the gradual decline of an once great city. I visited other mofosshol cities of BD and they are indeed much much better than Dhaka. But on the other hand, a lot of my other relatives will grind in Dhaka and continue to struggle because of the so called better schooling for their children and hospitals for them. People do wanna move out but for some reasons are held back too.

If I were you, I would also get fed up and would want to move out. Maybe the salary and benefits would be less but it will surely make up for healthier and less stressful daily life. Anyway, all the best to your job search outside of the city :)

thats the reason people wont move from dhaka and more and more are coming into dhaka from different parts of the country..how much more load can one city take?..Ami manus ke dos dei na, everybody wants the best for his kids and family and dhaka provides the best Schools,Colleges and Unis..

mufi_02
April 18, 2012, 02:57 PM
thats the reason people wont move from dhaka and more and more are coming into dhaka from different parts of the country..how much more load can one city take?..Ami manus ke dos dei na, everybody wants the best for his kids and family and dhaka provides the best Schools,Colleges and Unis..

I blame the govt and lack of visionary politicians. Whenever a city becomes too big govt needs to decentralize it.

Shaun petr
April 18, 2012, 03:10 PM
that's why i hate Banglacricket sometimes too much. Too many so called probashi. Who loves to criticise like hell all the way. I really don't get it. Where you'll get so much happy faces in other part of the world. So many flyovers and roads are blocked nowadays cause of under construction. May be these couple of things are creating a little bit problems. But those who can't see the future is the blind. Brisbane is a better place no doubt but why Stuart law called us poor country? I really don't get it. I am happy that he did leave. Guy who has no respect for the country shouldn't be our head coach. And those so called probashi just remember it's the country you belong. Don't just criticise when you can brand your country.
<br />Posted via BC Mobile Edition (Opera Mobile)

firstlane
April 18, 2012, 03:57 PM
that's why i hate Banglacricket sometimes too much. Too many so called probashi. Who loves to criticise like hell all the way. I really don't get it. Where you'll get so much happy faces in other part of the world. So many flyovers and roads are blocked nowadays cause of under construction. May be these couple of things are creating a little bit problems. But those who can't see the future is the blind. Brisbane is a better place no doubt but why Stuart law called us poor country? I really don't get it. I am happy that he did leave. Guy who has no respect for the country shouldn't be our head coach. And those so called probashi just remember it's the country you belong. Don't just criticise when you can brand your country.
<br />Posted via BC Mobile Edition (Opera Mobile)

Did he say so? Did I miss an article?

Crickbang
April 18, 2012, 06:59 PM
that's why i hate Banglacricket sometimes too much. Too many so called probashi. Who loves to criticise like hell all the way. I really don't get it. Where you'll get so much happy faces in other part of the world. So many flyovers and roads are blocked nowadays cause of under construction. May be these couple of things are creating a little bit problems. But those who can't see the future is the blind. Brisbane is a better place no doubt but why Stuart law called us poor country? I really don't get it. I am happy that he did leave. Guy who has no respect for the country shouldn't be our head coach. And those so called probashi just remember it's the country you belong. Don't just criticise when you can brand your country.
<br />Posted via BC Mobile Edition (Opera Mobile)

Dude get a grip on yourself. He didn't mean it that way. He said "I have always heard that Bangladesh is a poor country. But, everyday, I saw people who are always smiling brightly and happy to go to work everyday." Now how is that disrespectful? I don't see it. I read that article too you know? Try to understand the REAL meaning of a sentence before flipping out about people.

Zeeshan
April 18, 2012, 07:17 PM
Ashole Dhaka te beggers ekta severe problem. Ami Garir janala khola rakhte partam na ei begger/hawker der utpate jokhon last Dhakay gesilam..I also heard the beggers carry bag full of you know what with them and the beggers intimidate people to give money. Abar keu keu Chaabi diye gari te scratch mare vikkha na paile. So pathetic..

And the traffic is horrendous. It used to take me 2-3 hours to go to Dhanmondi from Basundhara. You can survive without electricity for few hours as most houses in Dhaka have generator nowadays..But like Banfan vai said you need to know "someone" to have good time in Dhaka.

You are to Mother Teresa what Lucifer is to God aren't ya? Good, good. Always good to have an opposing side. :applause:

Zeeshan
April 18, 2012, 07:21 PM
On topic: "Akhon amader ki hobe? :( :( " -bujhee kom

BengaliPagol
April 18, 2012, 08:17 PM
that's why i hate Banglacricket sometimes too much. Too many so called probashi. Who loves to criticise like hell all the way. I really don't get it. Where you'll get so much happy faces in other part of the world. So many flyovers and roads are blocked nowadays cause of under construction. May be these couple of things are creating a little bit problems. But those who can't see the future is the blind. Brisbane is a better place no doubt but why Stuart law called us poor country? I really don't get it. I am happy that he did leave. Guy who has no respect for the country shouldn't be our head coach. And those so called probashi just remember it's the country you belong. Don't just criticise when you can brand your country.

Posted via BC Mobile Edition (Opera Mobile)

Beggars on the street. Obviously Bangladesh is a poor country. I dont know why you are all hyped up about.

Anyways if you are a foreigner and come to Bangladesh it is harder to adjust if you bring your whole family. Obviously Mrs Law wouldnt be fond of Bangladesh. She wouldnt be able to do a great amount of things.

Bangladesh is a crazy place. The poor people, the electricity cuts, the rubbish, the pollution etc. But at the same time it is abundant on culture, something most western countries lack.

I think if the government spent money in the right ways then Bangladesh would be able to solve many problems and it would also be able to be a rich country also. Bangladesh does have money. Lots of businesses are set up there. Its a small country with a huge population.

We can fix all these problems if we wanted to. The government just decides not to.

tatsu-oga
April 19, 2012, 07:43 AM
Dhaka is going through a transitional phase right now. Other divisional cities like Sylhet,Rajshahi,Khulna are getting developed. Some satellite cities are also being constructed in Gazipur,Purbachal etc. Government doesn't give permission to build factories in dhaka and the land price is making industrialists build factories elsewhere. I think within the next 5-6 years it will be a lot better

nahaz
April 19, 2012, 07:46 AM
that's why i hate Banglacricket sometimes too much. Too many so called probashi. ... why Stuart law called us poor country? ....
Posted via BC Mobile Edition (Opera Mobile)

If you don't like Banglacricket and its thousands of Probashis, don't come here. We are an integral part of the forum. We often manage to give a more balanced perspective having had the understanding of two or more different cultures.

Stuart Law did not call us poor. He said others did, but he liked it.... I think if you consider how some struggle to adjust to Dhaka's conditions, maybe that's another good reason to choose Ian. He is adventurous and loves the good side of it.

As a side note, a newspaper from Calcutta cannot call Dhaka filthy. From what I heard from travellers there, Calcutta is pretty dirty itself. Full of slums. It is really a cultural shock for many foreigners.

Dhaka, and Bangladesh, have many problems. First thing is the traffic jam. When I had gone two years back, it is crazy sitting there in a traffic jam and watch your vehicle weave in and out. The drains from back when I was living in 2004 would always overflow during the rains, being open drains. This would mix with garbage from the road and make a filthy sewage cocktail. If one ever tried walking through that water, it itches. Imagine trying to go to the mosque. While we are on topic, noone can ever bother putting garbage in the garbage dump. Its always outside. Also have to laugh at how traffic lights are never followed, and how traffic controllers would try and beat the heck out of rickshawalas. No, I do not enjoy seeing the poor get beat up. I also hated how everyone is the subject of vicious gossip by every other Bangladeshi at every opportunity. Oh, and my neighbour once saw with his own eyes tonnes of blood being washed away from the street after someone got killed. Noone cared. Hundreds of flats in plain view...

But there are other sides to Dhaka. If one looks, one always finds the positives. I miss the interaction of the less complicated beings of Dhaka. I loved hearing the story of the rickshawala who was pulling a rickshaw for his younger brother, a brilliant sutdents doing his HSC. I love how an old cricket bat and a tennis ball can make so many millions of kids so happy every afternoon. I love the sense of pride Bangalishave towards their culture, the Rabidrasangeet, the Lalangithi, the awareness of the rest of the world. I love the fight in so many Bangladeshis. Things are tough there. But people always put an effort to make their friends and family smile.

I have never heard of sports unite people as much as cricket does to Bangladeshis. I know that everytime our cricket achieves something big, everyone feels happier for a day, or a week. Here in Aus, I don't see that. Winning World Cups doesn't make the nation happy for the next week, like it does every time we win one match. Here we write on papers to complain when someone sneezes on a bus, when someone's Ipod is too loud... People complain when the electricity prices go up 20% after 10 years, which means they cannot afford an extra overseas holiday every year....

Not to mention, Bangladesh has an amazing variety of delicious foods. If someone loves food, they should spend a month during Ramadan in Bangladesh and try the street food before they die.

Bangladesh, I guess, is not too bad when you consider its people and its culture:) :flag:

Not my cup of tea though just yet.. I can change more in the world from where I am right now ;)

Ian Pont
April 19, 2012, 08:22 AM
I wanted to add one other thing.

Jamie Siddons stayed 4 years and wanted to continue. He and his wife had made a home in Dhaka and their two kids, Stella and Toby were happy growing up there. Like I said, it is really what you can make of it. There are plenty of ex-pat westerners doing the same in Dhaka so having groups of new friends is not difficult.

Grant Luden, trainer, has just signed again for another year, so he will almost be at 4 years himself. If Dhaka was so dreadful I am certain he wouldn't stay.

As someone earlier said we have plenty of problems here in England: the weather, unions, strikes, fuel prices, a recession, house prices, food and living costs and a country that is pretty un-neighbourly. I am sure Bangladeshis find it equally as hard to come here and try to feel at home initially.

The common bond between us all though, is the wonderful game of cricket. We all share a passion for it and we all want to see it thrive. It is that game that brings us all side by side.

AsifTheManRahman
April 19, 2012, 09:29 AM
As a side note, a newspaper from Calcutta cannot call Dhaka filthy. From what I heard from travellers there, Calcutta is pretty dirty itself. Full of slums. It is really a cultural shock for many foreigners.
From experience: For every foot of dirt that I have washed off my body on a typical day out in Dhaka, I've had to wash off five feet and some more in Kolkata. The latter is probably easily one of the dirtiest cities in the world and certainly the dirtiest that I've ever been in.

Bonglababu
April 19, 2012, 09:42 AM
deshprem bhalo, kintu hamborami bhalo noi.
It's good to criticize our poverty, otherwise we clowns like to live in our complacent dream.
Brisbane is a better place no doubt but why Stuart law called us poor country? I really don't get it. I am happy that he did leave. Guy who has no respect for the country shouldn't be our head coach. And those so called probashi just remember it's the country you belong. Don't just criticise when you can brand your country.
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BANFAN
April 19, 2012, 03:11 PM
that's why i hate Banglacricket sometimes too much. Too many so called probashi. Who loves to criticise like hell all the way. I really don't get it. Where you'll get so much happy faces in other part of the world. So many flyovers and roads are blocked nowadays cause of under construction. May be these couple of things are creating a little bit problems. But those who can't see the future is the blind. Brisbane is a better place no doubt but why Stuart law called us poor country? I really don't get it. I am happy that he did leave. Guy who has no respect for the country shouldn't be our head coach. And those so called probashi just remember it's the country you belong. Don't just criticise when you can brand your country.
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I think you didn't read the interview carefully... If I remember correctly he said, "I was told that BD is a Poor country... But i see the people going to work happily...I see all happy faces....etc etc" I think you have failed to understand what he said/meant and over reacting...

And there is no denying fact that BD is a poor country...that's what the economic stats also say...if saying truth is a disrespect...you should try to change that truth first... Not The People who say that truth...So you shouldn't react so much even if he would say that....

nahaz
April 19, 2012, 04:50 PM
From experience: For every foot of dirt that I have washed off my body on a typical day out in Dhaka, I've had to wash off five feet and some more in Kolkata. The latter is probably easily one of the dirtiest cities in the world and certainly the dirtiest that I've ever been in.


Haha.. nice to know. Now every time I hear someone/newspaper from Calcutta criticising Dhaka/ Bangladesh's environment, I can have a quiet laugh to myself.

Navo
April 19, 2012, 05:28 PM
Haha.. nice to know. Now every time I hear someone/newspaper from Calcutta criticising Dhaka/ Bangladesh's environment, I can have a quiet laugh to myself.

And not only Kolkata. I spent some time in Bihar in 2008...I would recommend anyone who wants to see true poverty and destitution to visit that state, particularly places like Gaya. It's a city seemingly built on a rubbish heap.

And if you think Dhaka, with its multi million inhabitants, has a waste management problem, have you seen the conditions of Naples?

http://img.timeinc.net/time/daily/2008/0805/naples_rubbish_0521.jpg

Every country has its share of problems. Somehow we are always treated condescendingly/patronizingly by the international media.

Thanks for your kind words by the way, Ian.

BANFAN
April 19, 2012, 06:05 PM
BD has about 30% population bellow the poverty level and India a has more. And if you go by numbers, India has more than one BD bellow the poverty level.

And yes, Bangla (Kolakata), Bihar and Urissya; the empire of shiraj-ud-dowla ar ethe states with max poverty and yes the cities are too dirty too. And it wasn't long before IPL that, Ausies refused to play in India due to Pollution of the cities/environment and also put it up as a excuse for poor performance in India.

Roni_uk
April 19, 2012, 06:31 PM
I can add that living in Dhaka is an enriching experience. I never found it distressing or awful. It depends what end you come from this at. It is not easy to understand all the staring or get the mad traffic, but the people are warm and friendly.

People have great humour and it pays to smile a great deal and laugh. Dhaka is an assault on the senses; sights, sounds, smells and it is not what you would understand if you come from Europe.

I never felt at risk, unlike in some parts of the world and even the UK.

I feel Dhaka is what you make it. It's all about perspective...

Nicely said Sir Pont - thank you.

BengaliPagol
April 19, 2012, 06:41 PM
Hey Ian have you ever worn a lungi? Do you wear a lungi? Im just curious

Tiger-ess
April 19, 2012, 06:41 PM
So much drama involving our cricket. Makes want Siddons+ Pont+ Fountain back like never before.

Dhakablues
April 19, 2012, 08:21 PM
Its interesting that the thread has become more about Dhaka than Stuart Law quitting... thats what I love about BanglaCricket.... its never cut and dry!! :)

fuadomar
April 21, 2012, 03:38 AM
I can add that living in Dhaka is an enriching experience. I never found it distressing or awful. It depends what end you come from this at. It is not easy to understand all the staring or get the mad traffic, but the people are warm and friendly.

People have great humour and it pays to smile a great deal and laugh. Dhaka is an assault on the senses; sights, sounds, smells and it is not what you would understand if you come from Europe.

I never felt at risk, unlike in some parts of the world and even the UK.

I feel Dhaka is what you make it. It's all about perspective...
Thanks Ian for the nice words :-) ; I have doubt, those who hates dhaka and talks ill about it visited how many places in their life!

bujhee kom
April 22, 2012, 02:46 PM
Good-bye coach. All the best coach!

Tiger Manc
April 24, 2012, 04:27 AM
I can add that living in Dhaka is an enriching experience. I never found it distressing or awful. It depends what end you come from this at. It is not easy to understand all the staring or get the mad traffic, but the people are warm and friendly.

People have great humour and it pays to smile a great deal and laugh. Dhaka is an assault on the senses; sights, sounds, smells and it is not what you would understand if you come from Europe.

I never felt at risk, unlike in some parts of the world and even the UK.

I feel Dhaka is what you make it. It's all about perspective...

Great post mate!