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F6_Turbo
July 4, 2012, 06:25 AM
No physicists on here? Or have they wanked them selves into ecstasy..so haven't come online!


God particle is 'found': Scientists at Cern expected to announce on Wednesday Higgs boson particle has been discovered

Scientists 'will say they are 99.99% certain' the particle has been found
Leading physicists have been invited to event - sparking speculation that Higgs Boson particle has been found
'God Particle' gives particles that make up atoms their mass

Scientists at Cern will announce that the elusive Higgs boson 'God Particle' has been found at a press conference next week, it is believed.

Five leading theoretical physicists have been invited to the event on Wednesday - sparking speculation that the particle has been discovered.

Image

Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider are expected to say they are 99.99 per cent certain it has been found - which is known as 'four sigma' level.

Peter Higgs, the Edinburgh University emeritus professor of physics that the particle is named after, is among those who have been called to the press conference in Switzerland.
Invite: Peter Higgs, the professor the particle is named after, has been asked to attend the press conference at Cern

The management at Cern want the two teams of scientists to reach the 'five sigma' level of certainty with their results - so they are 99.99995 per cent sure - such is the significance of the results.

Tom Kibble, 79, the emeritus professor of physics at Imperial College London, has also been invited but is unable to attend.

He told the Sunday Times: 'My guess is that is must be a pretty positive result for them to be asking us out there.'

The Higgs boson is regarded as the key to understanding the universe. Physicists say its job is to give the particles that make up atoms their mass.

Without this mass, these particles would zip though the cosmos at the speed of light, unable to bind together to form the atoms that make up everything in the universe, from planets to people.

The collider, housed in an 18-mile tunnel buried deep underground near the French-Swiss border, smashes beams of protons – sub-atomic particles – together at close to the speed of light, recreating the conditions that existed a fraction of a second after the Big Bang.

If the physicists’ theory is correct, a few Higgs bosons should be created in every trillion collisions, before rapidly decaying.

This decay would leave behind a ‘footprint’ that would show up as a bump in their graphs.

However, despite 1,600 trillion collisions being created in the tunnel - there have been fewer than 300 potential Higgs particles.

Now it is thought that two separate teams of scientists, who run independent experiments in secret from each other, have both uncovered evidence of the particle.

However, the two groups, CMS and ATLAS, are expected to stop short of confirming its existence.

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2012/06/08/article-0-05BC11000000044D-335_634x458.jpg

http://www.atlas.ch/news/2012/latest-results-from-higgs-search.html


Loved Physics growing up, but it got to a stage, where I'd reached the limits of my capabilities/intellect, and decided to go in a different direction. But I still find it fascinating

CERN - that facility is one of mans greatest feats :notworthy:

Zunaid
July 4, 2012, 06:44 AM
It is a huge milestone. But calling it a God particle did a disservice to Physics. This is just the beginning.

F6_Turbo
July 4, 2012, 06:47 AM
It is a huge milestone. But calling it a God particle did a disservice to Physics. This is just the beginning.

Editors :rolleyes: It's why I left it out of the thread title.

HereWeGo
July 4, 2012, 09:49 AM
Its FOUND... And official btw :D
:up: :up: :up: :up: :up:

http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/07/04/higgs-boson-announcement-live/

Ajfar
July 4, 2012, 09:54 AM
I wonder how Sheldon Cooper would react to this news.

Zunaid
July 4, 2012, 09:56 AM
I wonder how Sheldon Cooper would react to this news.

Bazinga.

Sohel
July 4, 2012, 11:08 AM
I wonder how Sheldon Cooper would react to this news.

He's behind the news.

AsifTheManRahman
July 4, 2012, 11:45 AM
200 years later high school Physics students will look back at these reports and shake their heads in disappointment at how ancient their ancestors were.

F6_Turbo
July 4, 2012, 11:50 AM
200 years later high school Physics students will look back at these reports and shake their heads in disappointment at how ancient their ancestors were.

No they'll be too busy laughing at the Texas school curriculum. Creationism should get equal billing with evolution :floor:

Zeeshan
July 4, 2012, 12:13 PM
It is a huge milestone. But calling it a God particle did a disservice to Physics. This is just the beginning.

I like how you pulled a Newdow (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Newdow#Litigation) there.

Edit: On topic: More seriously, what does it REALLY mean for those of us uninitiated wit details of physics?

BANFAN
July 4, 2012, 05:27 PM
Finally CERN justifies its efforts and investment and Higgs will be the most relieved soul ATM ... Mankind is the beneficiary ... Well done.. A huge moment indeed...

Nasif
July 4, 2012, 09:34 PM
Mr. Bose (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satyendra_Nath_Bose) would be proud. I always feel proud by the fact that one of the two fundamental particles is named after a Bengali!

Although this news is not fully conclusive, I am sure with time, it will probably be conclusive. Particle physics and quantum mechanics are complex business. The world that is painted within the quantum realm, is drastically different from what we perceive to be reality. Even the experts sometimes have the "can't" believe moment. For layman it usually gets too complicated too quickly. I am certainly no expert; I would probably rate myself 6.5/10 in knowing basics of quantum and particle physics. I did get 5/5 in AP Physics exam and got mostly A and B+ in all my required college physics courses. Even then I have hard time grasping string theory and modern particle physics. I try to read as much as possible; as physics is my favorite topic. But I will honestly say, I am far from really grasping most of the content. I am not hoping to be a subject matter expert, rather know enough details so that I can understand the subject.

The fact is most who would read this news would probably not be able to grasp it as well. As such, they would miss out on some of the wonders of our world. If you are in that category, I would suggest following 2 materials to get started:
1. Read: Grand Design (http://www.amazon.com/The-Grand-Design-Stephen-Hawking/dp/0553805371) by Hawkins. If you are in US, your local library will most certainly carry it. You can use your library's online version to borrow it on Kindle. This is a must read. Although topics are heavy, it is presented very clearly from layman perspective. If your read it once, then read it again. 1 read will give you basics, on second read you will understand even more details.

2. Watch NOVA: The Fabric of the Cosmos (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/physics/fabric-of-cosmos.html), Ep. 3 "Quantum Leap"
Brian Greene's Nova series is just too good to miss. PBS still has this for free stream for US users. Link embedded below (direct link (http://video.pbs.org/video/2167398185/)). The whole series is an eye opener for those who love physics and want to appreciate it. If you haven't seen the whole series, try to watch all four episodes of The Fabric of the Cosmos (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/physics/fabric-of-cosmos.html)
<object width = "512" height = "328" > <param name = "movie" value = "http://dgjigvacl6ipj.cloudfront.net/media/swf/PBSPlayer.swf" > </param><param name="flashvars" value="video=2167398185&player=viral&chapter=1" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param > <param name = "allowscriptaccess" value = "always" > </param><param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param ><embed src="http://dgjigvacl6ipj.cloudfront.net/media/swf/PBSPlayer.swf" flashvars="video=2167398185&player=viral&chapter=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" wmode="transparent" allowfullscreen="true" width="512" height="328" bgcolor="#000000"></embed></object><p style="font-size:11px; font-family:Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; color: #808080; margin-top: 5px; background: transparent; text-align: center; width: 512px;">Watch <a style="text-decoration:none !important; font-weight:normal !important; height: 13px; color:#4eb2fe !important;" href="http://video.pbs.org/video/2167398185" target="_blank">The Fabric of the Cosmos: Quantum Leap</a> on PBS. See more from <a style="text-decoration:none !important; font-weight:normal !important; height: 13px; color:#4eb2fe !important;" href="http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/" target="_blank">NOVA.</a></p>

If you are not in USA, then you can get it for $2.99 in Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/Quantum-Leap-HD/dp/B0068ZI396)& Itunes (http://itunes.apple.com/us/tv-season/fabric-of-the-cosmos/id472387002). If you are too cheap for that, there are streams out there (google is your friend, ofcourse I will not post it here).

These two should get you started. There are tons of materials online; even Wiki is great read!

I love the design of our universe. The wonders that it holds within its fabrication is nothing short miracle. I believe physics is the only knowledge that truly connects us to the universe in a profound manner. Physics lets us appreciate this wondrous universe and our very existence.

cornerdtiger
July 4, 2012, 09:39 PM
is there anyway a layman can make sense of this. i mean i saw it all over the news but didnt understand

TigerEz
July 4, 2012, 09:46 PM
Yay we found it!!! so what now and what do we do with it now? will it help us invent something?

...if ur thinking that im lost on what this is, well im not! so chill!

Zunaid
July 4, 2012, 09:55 PM
Yay we found it!!! so what now and what do we do with it now? will it help us invent something?

...if ur thinking that im lost on what this is, well im not! so chill!

So tell us about the significance of the Higgs Boson and how it fits into the Standard Model.

Nasif
July 4, 2012, 09:56 PM
is there anyway a layman can make sense of this. i mean i saw it all over the news but didnt understand


This is one of the best one out there, watch it all the way, you will come out more knowledgeable.

<iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/41038445?portrait=0&color=c8b3df" webkitallowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="500" width="700"></iframe>

TigerEz
July 4, 2012, 10:02 PM
So tell us about the significance of the Higgs Boson and how it fits into the Standard Model.

Well its like this physics thing...and like its gonna like help us get to like other planets and stuff...

OK i kinda have admit that i dont know what this is.....would love to know tho,,,i read/saw videos about this but still have no idea what this is!

Zunaid
July 4, 2012, 10:11 PM
So the lesson is? Think before you open your mouth and eliminate all doubts.

ahnaf
July 5, 2012, 12:43 AM
Signaling a likely end to one of the longest, most expensive searches in the history of science, physicists said Wednesday that they had discovered a new subatomic particle that looks for all the world like the Higgs boson, a key to understanding why there is diversity and life in the universe.Like Omar Sharif materializing out of the shimmering desert as a man on a camel in "Lawrence of Arabia," the elusive boson has been coming slowly into view since last winter, as the first signals of its existence grew until they practically jumped off the chart.

"I think we have it," said Rolf-Dieter Heuer, the director general of CERN, the multinational research center headquartered in Geneva. The agency is home to the Large Hadron Collider, the immense particle accelerator that produced the new data by colliding protons. The findings were announced by two separate teams. Heuer called the discovery "a historic milestone."

He and others said that it was too soon to know for sure, however, whether the new particle is the one predicted by the Standard Model, the theory that has ruled physics for the last half-century. The particle is predicted to imbue elementary particles with mass. It may be an impostor as yet unknown to physics, perhaps the first of many particles yet to be discovered.

That possibility is particularly exciting to physicists, as it could point the way to new, deeper ideas, beyond the Standard Model, about the nature of reality.

For now, some physicists are simply calling it a "Higgslike" particle.

"It's something that may, in the end, be one of the biggest observations of any new phenomena in our field in the last 30 or 40 years," said Joe Incandela, a physicist of the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a spokesman for one of the two groups reporting new data on Wednesday.

Here at the Aspen Center for Physics, a retreat for scientists, bleary-eyed physicists drank champagne in the wee hours as word arrived via Webcast from CERN. It was a scene duplicated in Melbourne, Australia, where physicists had gathered for a major conference, as well as in Los Angeles, Chicago, Princeton, New York, London and beyond - everywhere that members of a curious species have dedicated their lives and fortunes to the search for their origins in a dark universe.

In Geneva, 1,000 people stood in line all night to get into an auditorium at CERN, where some attendees noted a rock-concert ambience. Peter Higgs, the University of Edinburgh theorist for whom the boson is named, entered the meeting to a sustained ovation.

Confirmation of the Higgs boson or something very much like it would constitute a rendezvous with destiny for a generation of physicists who have believed in the boson for half a century without ever seeing it. The finding affirms a grand view of a universe described by simple and elegant and symmetrical laws - but one in which everything interesting, like ourselves, results from flaws or breaks in that symmetry.

According to the Standard Model, the Higgs boson is the only manifestation of an invisible force field, a cosmic molasses that permeates space and imbues elementary particles with mass. Particles wading through the field gain heft the way a bill going through Congress attracts riders and amendments, becoming ever more ponderous.

Without the Higgs field, as it is known, or something like it, all elementary forms of matter would zoom around at the speed of light, flowing through our hands like moonlight. There would be neither atoms nor life.

Physicists said that they would probably be studying the new particle for years. Any deviations from the simplest version predicted by current theory - and there are hints of some already - could begin to answer questions left hanging by the Standard Model. For example, what is the dark matter that provides the gravitational scaffolding of galaxies?

And why is the universe made of matter instead of antimatter?

"If the boson really is not acting standard, then that will imply that there is more to the story - more particles, maybe more forces around the corner," Neal Weiner, a theorist at New York University, wrote in an email. "What that would be is anyone's guess at the moment."

Wednesday's announcement was also an impressive opening act for the Large Hadron Collider, the world's biggest physics machine, which cost $10 billion to build and only began operating two years ago. It is still running at only half-power.

Physicists had been icing the Champagne since last December. Two teams of

about 3,000 physicists each - one named Atlas, led by Fabiola Gianotti, and the other CMS, led by Incandela - operate giant detectors in the collider, sorting the debris from the primordial fireballs left after proton collisions.

Last winter they both reported hints of the same particle. They were not able, however, to rule out the possibility that it was a statistical fluke. Since then the collider has more than doubled the number of collisions it has recorded.

The results announced Wednesday capped two weeks of feverish speculation and Internet buzz as the physicists, who had been sworn to secrecy, did a breakneck analysis of some 800 trillion proton-proton collisions over the last two years.

Until last weekend, physicists at the agency were saying that they themselves did not know what the outcome would be.

Expectations soared when it was learned that the five surviving originators of the Higgs boson theory had been invited to the CERN news conference.

The December signal was no fluke, the scientists said Wednesday. The new particle has a mass of about 125.3 billion electron volts, as measured by the CMS group, and 126 billion according to Atlas. Both groups said that the likelihood that their signal was a result of a chance fluctuation was less than one chance in 3.5 million, so-called "five sigma," which is the gold standard in physics for a discovery.

Read full Story here (http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/news-by-industry/et-cetera/higgs-boson-discovery-of-particle-could-redefine-physical-world/articleshow/14685121.cms?curpg=2)

ahnaf
July 5, 2012, 01:11 AM
Well its like this physics thing...and like its gonna like help us get to like other planets and stuff...

OK i kinda have admit that i dont know what this is.....would love to know tho,,,i read/saw videos about this but still have no idea what this is!

What is a Boson?

The universe is made up of two classes of particles: bosons and fermions. Bosons obey Bose-Einstein statistics - a collection of them can condense together into a state where the particles are indistinguishable.

This theory was developed by SN Bose and expanded by Einstein[Try to know about SN Bose..You'll find something to cheer about as a bangali]. The special state of matter, called Bose-Einstein condensate, was created in 1995. All bosons can condense into this state at very low temperatures.

What is Higgs Boson?

There are several kinds of bosons, some elementary and others composite. A special kind of bosons - called the gauge bosons - mediates or carries the forces of nature.

The photons (particles of light) mediate the electromagnetic force, the W and Z bosons mediate the weak nuclear force, and the gluons carry the strong nuclear force. The hypothetical graviton might mediate the gravitational force, but we know nothing about it.

W and Z bosons, of which we are all made of, are thought to get their masses through another mediator, the Higgs Boson. To find it, physicists need to observe it at its creation as it immediately decays into other particles.


How Does the LHC Find It?

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) whirls around protons through a hollow tube and then meets them head on. The debris that flies from these collisions would include the Higgs Boson for a fraction of a second. Two particle detectors look for attributes of these flying particles.

The data that come out of these detectors - 40 m pictures a second - are beyond what any network of computers can process.

A processor farm of 50,000 computing cores selects 300 pictures a second, enough data every second to fill three million DVDs. 10,000 computers in 34 countries analyse these data, and 10,000 physicists look at the results.

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/photo.cms?msid=14681340

The image shows a typical candidate event including two high-energy photons whose energy (depicted by red towers) is measured in the CMS electromagnetic calorimeter. The yellow lines are the measured tracks of other particles produced in the collision. The pale blue volume shows the CMS crystal calorimeter barrel. Scientists at the world's biggest atom smasher claimed the discovery of a new subatomic particle Wednesday July 4, 2012, calling it 'consistent' with the long-sought Higgs boson - popularly known as the 'God particle' - that helps explain what gives all matter in the universe size and shape. (AP)

What did CERN Announce?

That they have found a particle with a mass of 125 billion electron volts that exhibits the characteristics of the Higgs Boson. Which means that it is the kind of particle that, according to the Standard Model of physics, would give masses to other particles.

They do not yet know, or are not absolutely sure, that it is the Higgs Boson, officially. Unofficially, all physicists know that they have found the Higgs Boson.

What Work is Still Left to be Done?

Physicists would study this particle intensely for several years. The LHC will shut down next year for one year. When it comes back, it will crank up its energies to twice the present levels. Protons will collide more intensely, computers will crunch more data, and physicists might observe more particles.

Source (http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/news-by-industry/et-cetera/god-particle-higgs-boson-discovery-signals-one-of-the-longest-most-expensive-searches-in-science-history/articleshow/14681305.cms?curpg=2)

Leafs PWN
July 5, 2012, 03:37 PM
Great summary ahnaf.

I remember taking a trip to the Perimeter Institute, here in Waterloo, during grade 12. We had a couple theoretical physicists explain the different classes of particles, the LHC and so on in general. I was both confused and fascinated by it.

I also remember them talking a little about the Higgs Boson, and how it could be the next biggest discovery in theoretical physics.

Glad to see it finally happen!

BANFAN
July 5, 2012, 05:22 PM
Well its like this physics thing...and like its gonna like help us get to like other planets and stuff...

OK i kinda have admit that i dont know what this is.....would love to know tho,,,i read/saw videos about this but still have no idea what this is!

If you are interested, you can go to you tube and search... "CERN" and "Higgs Bosson" watch all the videos and listen to the speakers. You will not be able to stop watching...it's amazing ... We even didn't have these concepts in our curriculum in colleges...

The Bangla Word "MOHA SHUNNO" for "SPACE" shall definitely become obsolete with the confirmation of Higgs Field ... Higgs Bossons are tiny particles that creats the Higgs field. And the space which we call MOHA SHUNNO ... Is no more SHUNNO ... Filled with Higgs Bossons...now go on with the videos...Eita layman language e bollam, as a layman...and if you can read Ahnaf bhai post before that, you will understand the videos in one go....:)

Zeeshan
July 5, 2012, 07:53 PM
The Bangla Word "MOHA SHUNNO" for "SPACE" shall definitely become obsolete with the confirmation of Higgs Field ... Higgs Bossons are tiny particles that creats the Higgs field. And the space which we call MOHA SHUNNO ... Is no more SHUNNO ... Filled with Higgs Bossons...now go on with the videos...Eita layman language e bollam, as a layman...and if you can read Ahnaf bhai post before that, you will understand the videos in one go....:)How does dark matter relate to Higgs boson? I am curious since you seem to conclude the problem with etymology of the word "space" in Bangla.

TigerEz
July 5, 2012, 07:54 PM
Thnx Ahnaf bhai...time to watch those videos all over again!

Zunaid
July 5, 2012, 07:58 PM
How does dark matter relate to Higgs boson? I am asking since you seem to conclude the problem with etymology of the word "space" in Bangla.

While the Standard Model has been proven to be mathematically consistent with EM, strong, and weak nuclear interactions and all predicted subatomic particles have been found, it still does not account for gravitons and dark matter. There is still much exciting physics to be done.

bujhee kom
July 5, 2012, 08:00 PM
Accha bora bhais, eita je ekhon obosheshe bohu khojar porey pawa gelo...eta ki bhabey khawa jete parey?

Zeeshan
July 5, 2012, 08:02 PM
you smoke it bk. duh!

And thanks Doc, although most of it went over my head. :p

Zunaid
July 6, 2012, 02:40 AM
you smoke it bk. duh!

And thanks Doc, although most of it went over my head. :p

I am not a physicist, I just play one on the side. I guess we need a Feynman or an Asimov to make all of that accessible to everyone.

Let's see if I can try to describe what's all the commotion about with resorting to too much jargon. Real physicists, please stand up and correct me when I stray. (Wow! This is beginning to sound like one of those religious posts. I keed)

Anyway, this work is in the area of particle physics, which deals with what matter and energy is made up of and how these components interact and work together. A true understanding of that would give us an understanding of how everything exists and where the universe is going.

Anyway, scientists have been coming up with various models that can explain how matter is put together and one of these models, the Standard Model, has come to be accepted and has accurately described ALL known subatomic particles and the fundamental interactions between them.

An atom really is divisible - and is composed of fundamental subatomic particles called leptons, quarks, gluons etc). A combination of these give rise to atomic level particles such as the proton, neutron, and electron. These subatomic particles are held together by several kinds of forces - electromagnetic, strong and weak nuclear forces. These forces determine how they bind or interact.

At the time the standard model was proposed, not ALL the particles the model predicted were seen in nature. Experiments were conducted by physicists over the years and one by one each of the predicted particle was discovered.

These experiments are conducted in these huge devices called linear accelerators - where atoms are accelerated to extreme high-speed and made to collide. This simulates partially the state during the big-bang and the high-energy collisions results in atomic particles breaking up into subatomic particles. Scientists then look at the experimental data to see existence of new and undiscovered particles.

Anyway, going back to the standard model, while the model is mathematically self-consistent (this means that it is free of mathematical errors and all conclusions derived from the axioms are logically correct). As I had mentioned before, all the particles predicted by the model were ultimately proven by experiments to be correct.

There was, however, one issue with the standard model. The model did not require ANY particle to have mass. The mathematical self-consistency remained. But we all know, some particles have masses and scientists needed to augment the model to account for mass. In the mid 60s, three independent group of scientists came up with the same model to account for mass WITHOUT breaking other parts of particle physics theory that were known to be reasonably correct. Getting a bit technical here, all three proposed the existence of a field (Higgs Field) that permeates all space and a mechanism that allows this field to give particles their mass. This was called the Higgs Mechanism and the simplest theory that explained how this works required the existence of the then undiscovered Higgs Boson.

This was in the 60s and scientists had been trying for 40+ years to find a proof of its existence. Before the US Tevatron linear accelerator was shut down due to lack of funding, it led the experiments which were later taken over at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) built for $10B particularly to find this particle and conduct other high-energy particle physics experiments.

This is what was reported to have been found by two independent group of researchers at the LHC. They discovered a Boson with the properties similar to that of the predicted Higgs Boson. You may have heard of terms called 4-sigma and 5-sigma when you heard of the discovery. This is a statistical measure that kind of gives the odds that the results you see are coming from some random event and NOT from what you expect to see. The 5-sigma implies a 99.99994% certainty.

So what does the discovery mean? What are its implications?

That's for another day.

Zeeshan
July 6, 2012, 02:47 AM
^Thanks. I have much clearer understanding now. (Now you didnt type all that with two fingers in iPhone did you? :P)

It does pique my interest about the mathematical consistency. I really should've watched the videos posted earlier, but nothing beats reading a great post in someone's original voice.

Jadukor
July 6, 2012, 02:59 AM
Zee are you stalking Z Bhai... :rolleyes:
(just realized Z bhai sounds like an affirmative here)

Thread opener dekhi thread khulei khalash... F6 don't be the dog that poops and casually walks away from the lawn. Contribute man.

Zeeshan
July 6, 2012, 03:20 AM
Jadukor O! Jadukor! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dPElPtPAz7Y)

cricket_pagol
July 6, 2012, 02:51 PM
Thank you Zunaid Bhai, things are more clearer now.

BANFAN
July 6, 2012, 06:33 PM
Give a good idea of empty space and Higgs field & Standard Model...

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y-vKh_jKX7Q&feature=youtube_gdata_player)

Zunaid
July 7, 2012, 01:07 AM
<header class="postHeader" style="color: rgb(51, 51, 51); font-family: georgia, 'times new roman', times, serif; font-size: 11px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: 16px; orphans: 2; text-align: left; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); ">For the Indian Father of the ‘God Particle,’ a Long Journey from Dhaka (http://india.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/06/the-man-behind-boson/)

<address class="byline author vcard" style="font-style: normal; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 1.1em; line-height: 1.2em; color: rgb(128, 128, 128); margin-top: 2px; margin-bottom: 2px; ">By SAMANTH SUBRAMANIAN (http://india.blogs.nytimes.com/author/samanth-subramanian/)

From the New York Times

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2012/07/06/world/asia/6-Bose-Dacca-IndiaInk/6-Bose-Dacca-IndiaInk-articleInline.jpgCourtesy of Falguni Sarkar/The S.N. Bose ProjectSatyendra Nath Bose at Dacca University (now Dhaka) in Bangladesh in the 1930s.
</address></header> ¶ (http://india.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/06/the-man-behind-boson/?smid=fb-share#p[ItwIMB])

In the word “boson,” as media reports have plentifully pointed out during the past two days, is contained the surname of Satyendra Nath Bose, the Calcutta physicist who first mathematically described the class of particles to which he gave his name. As was common with Indian scientists in the early 20th century, however, his work might easily have eluded international recognition. Like the mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujam, Mr. Bose was saved from obscurity by a generous and influential mentor in Europe.In Mr. Bose’s case, that mentor turned out to be one of the greatest physicists of them all: Albert Einstein.

Read more (http://india.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/06/the-man-behind-boson/)

Navo
July 7, 2012, 01:18 AM
^ It amazes me how SN Bose was such a ground-breaking physicist and a polyglot at the same time.

Zunaid
July 7, 2012, 01:31 AM
^ It amazes me how SN Bose was such a ground-breaking physicist and a polyglot at the same time.

All the contemporary scientists at that time appeared to be polyglots and polymath. Time to start a 'Bose thread' - cover the 3 + 1 famous Boses and other contemporaries.

Navo
July 7, 2012, 01:40 AM
I mean, he translated Einstein's papers on General Relativity from German to English and he still didn't consider himself to be fluent?!

There was an article in the Guardian a year or so back about how being a polymath is increasingly discouraged nowadays.

Zeeshan
July 7, 2012, 02:13 AM
Navo bhai tuk tuk translation != fluency :)

Navo
July 7, 2012, 02:27 AM
Navo bhai tuk tuk translation != fluency :)

Arre jai hok, oi shomoi to google translate chilo nah :p

ammark
July 7, 2012, 04:09 AM
All the contemporary scientists at that time appeared to be polyglots and polymath. Time to start a 'Bose thread' - cover the 3 + 1 famous Boses and other contemporaries.

More worryingly, an entire generation of polymath and polyglot scientists and thinkers were lost from the grasps of University of Dhaka with the partition of '47. That is the real tragedy for East Bengal. If that nonsense from Jinnah and All-India Muslim League didnt happen, today we wouldnt be debating if Amartya Sen was from Dhaka or not, or feel lost pride that SC Bose has little legacy remaining in Bangladesh.

3 years ago a visiting professor from Australia and her physicist son came to Dhaka and they had lunch with us. The son had toured Dhaka University and went through the Dept of Physics and Applied Physics at Curzon Hall before joining us for lunch. But he wasnt told by anyone about SC Bose and his error/discovery of the Bose-Einstein statistics being done in DU. He was surprised to learn that from me, after having probably walked around the very places where SC Bose discovered his "error" on the blackboard.

Zunaid
July 7, 2012, 04:19 AM
Probably the reason he wasn't told about Bose is the same reason many want to change our anthem from Tagore's to someone else.

Rifat
July 7, 2012, 05:44 AM
200 years later high school Physics students will look back at these reports and shake their heads in disappointment at how ancient their ancestors were.

It is amazing how a new discovery can radically change the way we think about things...

ammark
July 7, 2012, 06:30 AM
Probably the reason he wasn't told about Bose is the same reason many want to change our anthem from Tagore's to someone else.

Maybe they should change it to a song from some gas bag singer like Hridoy Khan. It'll be an apt reflection of the times.

Nasif
July 7, 2012, 12:29 PM
There was an article in the Guardian a year or so back about how being a polymath is increasingly discouraged nowadays.

Or is it that the knowledge has become so specific that you can be a polymath and taken seriously by your peers. As a result, you avoid even attempting anything that is out of your sme boundary.

Navo
July 7, 2012, 05:43 PM
Or is it that the knowledge has become so specific that you can be a polymath and taken seriously by your peers. As a result, you avoid even attempting anything that is out of your sme boundary.

That's definitely one of the reasons why there are fewer accomplished polymaths nowadays. Or so they say.