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tiger_bright
July 24, 2012, 01:51 PM
As you know I have just finished my masters in Economics. I am considering a job in investment banking or maybe doing a PhD. Either way, to be frank, I see my long term future either here or in North America.

This made me think about the next generation. If I settle here, is it not better for my children to be wholly integrated and therefore to speak English and other European languages. I have not married yet, but may opt to marry outside the community for aesthetic reasons.

Those born/raised in the west, do you speak Bangla?

Dilscoop
July 24, 2012, 02:16 PM
No. I was watching all those Ispahani commercials during today's game. And it annoyed the heck out of me. I don't know what it is about Bangla, but it sounds very corny to me. The fluent speakers and the kids that grow up in English speaking countries, both parties sound very corny.

Leafs PWN
July 24, 2012, 02:21 PM
Yes. My kids will retain every bit of Bangla culture I can think of.

I don't see why any logical person would want their kids to learn less languages (unless its too many).

Ajfar
July 24, 2012, 02:35 PM
Why would I not want to. It's not like the kids are capable of learning only one language. IMO if you live in western part of the world, you don't have to worry about your kids learning to speak english. Pichhi ra cartoon dekhei english shike fele. My kid is going to speak proper sylheti. I don't want all those dokandars in BD ripping my kid off thinking paise foreign maal.

Dillu the language itself is not fruity, the way people talk might be.That's 2 completely different things.

tiger_bright
July 24, 2012, 02:36 PM
^

Implies you want your kids to retain links with Bd?

I am not so bothered. There is nothing amazing about Bd that one would cherish at all costs.

Ajfar
July 24, 2012, 02:43 PM
^ Yes I do. I would think anyone who is Bangladeshi would want their kid to retain links to BD. It's part of who you are. Language is the most important part of our culture. It becomes extremly difficult to relate/understand other aspect of the culture if you don't speak the language. People gave their lives so that Bangla can be our matri-basha. We have an obligation to pass this down to the next generation.

tiger_bright
July 24, 2012, 02:46 PM
The food is good. That's about it from my POV.

NoName
July 24, 2012, 02:52 PM
Ideally I would want mine to know Bangla, even if it is in its own simplicity, but it depends on them if they want to retain it. I'm definitely not going to force them into speaking it.

Antora
July 24, 2012, 02:58 PM
I've been born & raised outside of BD & I can speak/read/write Bangla and I will make sure my kids can speak too ( in the mean time I shall improve on my Bangla a bit more so I can be an awesome teacher to my kids :p).

cricheart
July 24, 2012, 03:11 PM
As you know I have just finished my masters in Economics. I am considering a job in investment banking or maybe doing a PhD. Either way, to be frank, I see my long term future either here or in North America.

This made me think about the next generation. If I settle here, is it not better for my children to be wholly integrated and therefore to speak English and other European languages. I have not married yet, but may opt to marry outside the community for aesthetic reasons.

Those born/raised in the west, do you speak Bangla?

Somtimes wishing & happening wont be same, especially when you are there to adopt in a foreign country. North America itself a big place though, if you place yourself in a multicultural society there is no option but grow up children accordingly (learning/practicing local languages) and english is must.
Learning kids bangla will happen anyway if you marry a bangali woman; but to keep them in habit of speaking bangla when they growup a bit and go though learning phase in school or other places, is more depends on YOU PARENTS, how much time you spend on them on it, and access in local/surrounding Bengali cultural/social activities. Yup that why when its come up to kids, they need more access learning it from relatives; so if possible immigrate with full family. Cant help advice on 'Corny' part, as beyond out of control as Banglish will allways sounds like that, but I been UK where I found few 2nd/3rd generation well mannered Bangalis speaks Bangla fluently.

Zeeshan
July 24, 2012, 03:17 PM
We need to preserve the heritage of Bangla at all costs not necessarily through family but through any means available. This actually has serious ramifications as many of the ethnic languages are getting extinct. I would never want to see Bangla die away - just because of the sheer beauty of it otherwise- excluding the medium as I am not the person to settle down with family.

As for "benefits"; well any language learning has cerebral benefits. But that's a moot point.

I think Farooqi and co. are doing disservice to the language. What happened to the artistic natoks that were present before?

ammark
July 24, 2012, 03:20 PM
I think Farooqi and co. are doing disservice to the language. What happened to the artistic natoks that were present before?

Passed away a few days ago. Havent seen a decent natok serial since Aaj Robibar in 1997 tbh. What followed were all sub-par. [edit] well I didnt quite find Ekannoborti and Megh Bolechhe Jabo Jabo as good as the older stuff.

Ajfar
July 24, 2012, 03:27 PM
^ what about 'Ronger Manush'? I thought that was a really good serial.

mufi_02
July 24, 2012, 04:34 PM
I want my future wife to speak good Bangla. Polapain porer bepar.

iDumb
July 24, 2012, 07:15 PM
I have not married yet, but may opt to marry outside the community for aesthetic reasons.



lol for aesthetic reasons? lol... eita maane ki? tumi biya korba aar pola banaiba manuske dekhanor jonno?

shuno eishob bepare chinta kom kora bhalo... tumi tomar bou kemon hobe sheita te contro ache kintu tomar chele meye ke rokom hom sheta Allahr kaache...

iDumb
July 24, 2012, 07:19 PM
the fact that you are considering a phd in economics show that you are a bhodai....forget about the rest of your profoundly disrespectful post.

bhodai usually begets more bhodai.... ekhon sheita shada hok, kala hok or bangali.....

you gonna have a beutiful bhodai child at the rate u are going....

goru
July 24, 2012, 07:25 PM
Ideally, my children should speak all of the following languages:

1) Mandarin
2) English
3) Spanish
4) Hindi

Bangla would be a "nice to have" ... but it is definitely not desirable if they speak broken Bangla like most of the kids who grow up in the West (I told my gf to never ever speak to me in Bangla... just can't stand the butchering!).

Rumz_01
July 24, 2012, 08:01 PM
Of course.

iDumb
July 24, 2012, 08:36 PM
i dnt wanna have a kid

al Furqaan
July 24, 2012, 08:37 PM
Bangla is a very difficult language I think...and its not particularily pleasing to the ears unlike Urdu/Hindi. Thats just my two cents. I can speak it fluently, and if I marry a Bengali then I'd like my kids to know Bangla for identity reasons. But beyond that Bangla is pretty ordinary language to borrow from Tamim/Sehwag.

I wish I knew Sylheti, now thats a language I could pass down to my kids with emphatic happiness!

FaHiMa
July 24, 2012, 08:47 PM
Yes, ofcourse!
AND LOL to two of the posts here that I'd rather not quote...

Roey Haque
July 24, 2012, 10:09 PM
the fact that you are considering a phd in economics show that you are a bhodai....forget about the rest of your profoundly disrespectful post.

bhodai usually begets more bhodai.... ekhon sheita shada hok, kala hok or bangali.....

you gonna have a beutiful bhodai child at the rate u are going....

Watch out man, you might get banned!
I don't know why I care to warn you given our past beef, but I guess everybody adds color to this grand old forum.

Navo
July 24, 2012, 10:09 PM
Ideally, my children should speak all of the following languages:

1) Mandarin
2) English
3) Spanish
4) Hindi

Bangla would be a "nice to have" ... but it is definitely not desirable if they speak broken Bangla like most of the kids who grow up in the West (I told my gf to never ever speak to me in Bangla... just can't stand the butchering!).

Don't understand why you would want your kid to learn Hindi when learning Bangla fluently will allow them to pick up Hindi quite easily. Some Bangladeshi kids pick up Hindi because they watch Bollywood films regularly but I didn't/don't yet I was still able to learn Hindi quite quickly when I moved to India because of my Bangla language base.

In terms of learning languages - is being able to speak sufficient or should they be able to read and write fluently as well? Learning how to speak Mandarin and Spanish isn't so hard but being able to read and write well is a completely different matter...

Bonglababu
July 24, 2012, 10:22 PM
I prefer English and Spanish.

simon
July 25, 2012, 03:13 AM
No offense to anyone here but after coming in abroad I always disliked how parents speak in English or french or other languages to their young kids,I heard some saying bangla shikha ki hobe?jei desh e jonmaise/boro hochcey shei desh er bhasha tai shikhuk.
But the worst is parents in BD who want their kidsto do a lot better in English than Bangla and never bother how banglish their kids are getting.
<br />Posted via BC Mobile Edition (Android)

mona
July 25, 2012, 03:26 AM
There is nothing amazing about Bd that one would cherish at all costs.
The food is good. That's about it from my POV.

Are you some kind of troll?

And what about this gem

I have not married yet, but may opt to marry outside the community for aesthetic reasons.

What marrying outside the community will make you a better painter or something?

Anyway, it's definitely worthwhile to know more than one language, and Bangla is the most convenient and easiest one to start with.
My bangla (including accent) is pretty good, helped by my above average intelligence and natural linguistic ability. Came at the expense of my parents' (well, mum's) English though, because they always speak Bangla at home. Wasn't able to read or write (Bangla) until a mortified cousin in Bangladesh taught me in 3 hours from newspapers when I was 10. I think it's worthwhile seeing how they go, but don't push it if they're hopeless.

Alfie.. wouldn't say Hindi is particularly pleasing to the ears. I certainly prefer the Bangladeshi FOB accent to the Indian one a million gazillion times over.

And Goru.. I would add French to your list if you are going with the big guns.

F6_Turbo
July 25, 2012, 03:38 AM
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3077/2705725990_3ff57cefeb.jpg

Don't you just love them....how else can one justify knowing a second language as a hindrance to integration.

:lol:

I notice the I LOVE Pakistan crew also dropped in for a visit.

Jadukor
July 25, 2012, 04:00 AM
Of course I would. Not interested in having a kid at this point but I ever do I would want my kids to master at least 3 languages.

Naimul_Hd
July 25, 2012, 04:03 AM
People in Bangladesh proudly admit their children in 'English Medium' school, i would proudly admit my kids in 'Bangla Medium' School (if there is any) in Australia.

Jadukor
July 25, 2012, 04:11 AM
People in Bangladesh proudly admit their children in 'English Medium' school, i would proudly admit my kids in 'Bangla Medium' School (if there is any) in Australia.

Why would there be a bangla medium school in australia? That doesn't sound like a sustainable business model.

F6_Turbo
July 25, 2012, 04:13 AM
People in Bangladesh proudly admit their children in 'English Medium' school, i would proudly admit my kids in 'Bangla Medium' School (if there is any) in Australia.

This isn't even about Bangla/English medium...I am flabbergasted that someone would think knowing Bangla would stop you from being fully integrated. Then again, if you're ashamed of yourself, then I can understand you trying hard to deny your past.

Bhai ami lucky, ami forsha, bou-o forsha, so in terms of skin color, already integrated! Now to change my name...

Naimul_Hd
July 25, 2012, 04:17 AM
This isn't even about Bangla/English medium...I am flabbergasted that someone would think knowing Bangla would stop you from being fully integrated. Then again, if you're ashamed of yourself, then I can understand you trying hard to deny your past.Bhai ami lucky, ami forsha, bou-o forsha, so in terms of skin color, already integrated! Now to change my name...

What are you talking about brother ? When did i say i am ashamed of my past ? Why should i be ashamed of myself ? Where does this race issue come from ? :facepalm:

Naimul_Hd
July 25, 2012, 04:19 AM
Why would there be a bangla medium school in australia? That doesn't sound like a sustainable business model.

There is a Bangla School in Campbelltown in Sydney. Surprized ?

We even have Bangla Academy in Sydney.

Zunaid
July 25, 2012, 04:19 AM
What are you talking about brother ? When did i say i am ashamed of my past ? Why should i be ashamed of myself ? Where does this race issue come from ? :facepalm:

He wasn't responding to you in that comment. But to the one who opined that knowing Bangla would prevent integration. I thought the topic change was obvious.

Jadukor
July 25, 2012, 04:23 AM
There is a Bangla School in Campbelltown in Sydney. Surprized ?

We even have Bangla Academy in Sydney.

I definitely am surprised. I could understand a school for learning bangla but never thought there would be schools having the entire curriculum in Bangla like in Bangladesh. I stand corrected.

ammark
July 25, 2012, 04:24 AM
Bangla would be a "nice to have" ... but it is definitely not desirable if they speak broken Bangla like most of the kids who grow up in the West (I told my gf to never ever speak to me in Bangla... just can't stand the butchering!).

Amen. I was thinking about this the other day too, and if my kids were to grow up abroad, I probably wouldnt hammer bangla and bangla culture into them, so as to expect them to live up to my standards. I've some pretty messed up cousins and friends in Canada who, to me, seem to really suffer from an identity crisis - they try pretty hard to be Bangladeshi, despite never having lived in Bangladesh. On the contrary my other cousins who harbour no pretensions about being Bangladeshi/culturallly desi have turned out to be model individuals that I myself would aspire to be like.

ps: Just recalled the term ABCD. And Al, you're probably an exception: I credit that to me having introduced you to cricket! .....well, maybe not.... your mom's really anal and wouldnt even let me take you out for fuchka, you poor soul! You're like somewhere between ABCD and normal I guess! :D


....and Jeebus, Mona are you even alive? I went up to Brizzy for a day last Christmas, and contemplated msging you. But then it was only for a day, and I had plans from before so didnt bother. Next time, maybe.

F6_Turbo
July 25, 2012, 04:50 AM
Naim - like Z said...cross connection bhai.

Also has something changed, Campbelltown Bangla School was a Sunday school was it not?

Naimul_Hd
July 25, 2012, 04:56 AM
^^ Its okay bhai, i understood :)

ammark
July 25, 2012, 04:57 AM
And here's an example of a close friend (and bhabi) of mine who grew up in Melbourne. Despite speaking very good conversational Bangla, words like "Chhotolok" and "Aurthohin" get lost in translation for her. Why? Because to her, chhotolok means the opposite of "Borolok", ie. a "gorib lok".

And "Aurthohin" is translated directly as "Aurtho" = "meaning" rather than the alternative "Aurthohin = without finances/ without means".

goru
July 25, 2012, 06:30 AM
And Goru.. I would add French to your list if you are going with the big guns.

I'd rather have Arabic or Russian (useful in politics/business world) on the list before French... or even Japanese (useful in business/engineering world).

French always felt like a "forced" second language to me in the western world. Spanish should have taken its place long ago...

BengaliPagol
July 25, 2012, 06:46 AM
There is a Bangla School in Campbelltown in Sydney. Surprized ?

We even have Bangla Academy in Sydney.

The Bangla School in Campbelltown is pretty popular amongst Bengali communities around Campbelltown, Lumeah, Minto, Ingleburn and Macquarie Fields areas. I know that their are LOTS of Bengalis heavily involved with the Bangla school. They run alot of fundraisers and stuff for the school.

Naimul_Hd
July 25, 2012, 06:59 AM
The Bangla School in Campbelltown is pretty popular amongst Bengali communities around Campbelltown, Lumeah, Minto, Ingleburn and Macquarie Fields areas. I know that their are LOTS of Bengalis heavily involved with the Bangla school. They run alot of fundraisers and stuff for the school.

Not only that, there are few other 'Language (Bangla) Schools in Sydney :

Marrickville Bangla Patshala

Lakemba Bangla School

Bangladeshi Community School

and few other organizations who run Bangla courses in public schools.

mufi_02
July 25, 2012, 08:42 AM
Bangla is a very difficult language I think...and its not particularily pleasing to the ears unlike Urdu/Hindi. Thats just my two cents. I can speak it fluently, and if I marry a Bengali then I'd like my kids to know Bangla for identity reasons. But beyond that Bangla is pretty ordinary language to borrow from Tamim/Sehwag.

I wish I knew Sylheti, now thats a language I could pass down to my kids with emphatic happiness!

Really bro!! You think everyday Hindi-Urdu is more soothing than Bangla? I couldn't disagree more. Formal Bangla sounds very soft and soothing, in fact more soothing than those languages. We should learn to love our language and not compare with other languages esp Hindi and Urdu.

mona
July 25, 2012, 08:43 AM
....and Jeebus, Mona are you even alive? I went up to Brizzy for a day last Christmas, and contemplated msging you. But then it was only for a day, and I had plans from before so didnt bother. Next time, maybe.

Highly offended that you were in my hood and didn't holla! However, I forgive you because 1) you were only here for one day and 2) I was working in the country around that time and most likely wasn't in town. Next time for sure!



I'd rather have Arabic or Russian (useful in politics/business world) on the list before French... or even Japanese (useful in business/engineering world).

French always felt like a "forced" second language to me in the western world. Spanish should have taken its place long ago...

Whatevz.. who important speaks Spanish these days. Certainly not Spain.

I see a pitiful under-representation of African languages. I think you should consider Zulu for your cultivated issue. Not only may it come in handy in a potential hold up situation on the streets of Johannesburg, they would be able to speak with clicks and be really cool. Best dad everrrr!

Kabir
July 25, 2012, 08:58 AM
I'm married to a non-Bangladeshi, so I get asked this question all the time. My answer is always that I want my kid to know Bangla over their mother's language, but that's just because I don't want my kids to speak in my wife's language more than mine!

I personally think kids should know their roots and their culture where their parents are coming from. Otherwise there are cultural barriers between you and the kids - I don't want that to happen. If learning the language helps with this, it's even better. End of the day, when I have a kid, I will more than likely make sure that my kid learns Bangla.

Living abroad and learning multiple languages can be challenging for kids. I have a cousin who was brought up in Canada. She was learning English, French, and Bangla at the same time...and she went crazy (literally). The doctors suggested that my uncle/aunt focus on one language, so they chose French. This is an important experience we all need to learn from. It's not always up to us whether our kids can speak the language we want them to speak. In my home, considering mine and my wife's languages, there will be 4 languages that my kids will potentially need to learn...not an easy thing. So I'll definitely go easy on them (when I have kids :)).

Crisis
July 25, 2012, 09:39 AM
If you are a Bangladeshi and are NOT considering teaching your children Bengali, you should be lajuk of yourself. It may also show how patriotic you are. Our Muktijodhhas died to keep Bangladesh alive on the face of the planet.

My dad used to be a diplomat. Due to the nature of his work, MOFA always sent him to different countries. I myself wasn't born in Bangladesh.In my entire life of 27yrs., I lived in Bangladesh for 6 years. Does that mean I can't speak, write or read Bengali. I am fluent in all of these. If you ahve a debate with me in Bangla, I believe I can definitely keep up in Bnagla. My parents got books from BD for me ... Adorsholipi and all Bangla medium books that are taught till Year 3.
I have read most of the popular poems, Thakurmar jhuli, Tagore's books in Bangla, have read through Horolal Ray's grammer book, have read Feluda, all Kuasha books, and I still regularly download Jafar Iqbal's books on esnip and read the ebooks. I can still vividly remember the short story "Birommona" that should still exist in a certain year's Bangla medium Bangla book. I like BD band music and still listen to Aurthohin, Souls, Dalchoot, Warfaze, Ark, etc. I also like BD pop singers like Kumar Biswajit. I talk to everyone at home in Bangla and don't hesitate to type Banglish jerokom ekhon korlam. I enjoyed BD natoks and am also a fan of good actors/actresses.
However, I can't speak Dhakaiya and can't undestand it due to my overseas upbringing.

Did I mention that I am planning to get married soon and am only considering Bangladeshi girls ?

So, if I am a foreign product who can achieve so much, why can't you ? Gordon massage to all the parents who live abroad and whose kids can't speak Bangla properly.

Crisis
July 25, 2012, 09:48 AM
Passed away a few days ago. Havent seen a decent natok serial since Aaj Robibar in 1997 tbh. What followed were all sub-par. [edit] well I didnt quite find Ekannoborti and Megh Bolechhe Jabo Jabo as good as the older stuff.

Bondhon ?
Sharey tin tola ?
420 ?

I must say that I haven't watched BD natoks properly since I moved to UK. Time koi ? Plus, the BD channels that we get here are not live streams from BD but are repackaged streams from UK and natoks don't have any particular showtime :waiting:
I did see a few natoks here and there but natok directors these days rasta thekey actor/actress dhorey aney and the acting is below par. Maybe all the good actors have become directors and there is a vacuum which isn't getting filled as quickly as it should have been. Tisha and Opurbo seem like only decent new faces.

Kabir
July 25, 2012, 09:49 AM
If you are a Bangladeshi and are NOT considering teaching your children Bengali, you should be ashamed of yourself. It also shows how patriotic you are. It also shows how much you respect our Muktijodhhas who died to keep Bangladesh alive on the face of the planet.

Tone it down. Seriously.

You might as well stay quiet If you can't speak without giving anyone shame. No one needs a lesson from you about patriotism and history of Bangladesh and how to respect our muktijodhdhas.

Crisis
July 25, 2012, 10:03 AM
Tone it down. Seriously.

You might as well stay quiet If you can't speak without giving anyone shame. No one needs a lesson from you about patriotism and history of Bangladesh and how to respect our muktijodhdhas.

Have a re-read ? Is this OK ?

goru
July 25, 2012, 10:55 AM
Whatevz.. who important speaks Spanish these days. Certainly not Spain.

Spanish is important to most Americans... how else would they communicate with their janitors, gardeners, waiters, etc? (/racist_troll)

Kabir
July 25, 2012, 11:17 AM
Have a re-read ? Is this OK ?

Not willing to waste any more of my time on your useless comment. So, no - I'll pass.

F6_Turbo
July 25, 2012, 11:36 AM
I don't think there is anything wrong if people here have Bangla down the list in terms of priorities, for whatever reasons(Other more relevant languages, multicultural home, dual language countries)...

The assertion that NOT knowing Bangla is an advantage is however :(

Dilscoop
July 25, 2012, 12:31 PM
What goru said.

cluster11
July 25, 2012, 01:25 PM
I think goru mentioned those 4 languages because they are the most spoken in the world. It is always good for kids to learn foreign languages in addition to their native tongue IMHO.

Don't understand why you would want your kid to learn Hindi when learning Bangla fluently will allow them to pick up Hindi quite easily. Some Bangladeshi kids pick up Hindi because they watch Bollywood films regularly but I didn't/don't yet I was still able to learn Hindi quite quickly when I moved to India because of my Bangla language base.

In terms of learning languages - is being able to speak sufficient or should they be able to read and write fluently as well? Learning how to speak Mandarin and Spanish isn't so hard but being able to read and write well is a completely different matter...

Roni_uk
July 25, 2012, 06:37 PM
TBH, I dont find Bengali girls attractive.


I can see why he is banned :P

al Furqaan
July 25, 2012, 07:52 PM
Alfie.. wouldn't say Hindi is particularly pleasing to the ears. I certainly prefer the Bangladeshi FOB accent to the Indian one a million gazillion times over.

Mona, defo agree with you here...the fobby accented Indians and Pakis sound terrible compared to our Bengali uncles and aunties. The whole V-W switharoo is annoying as f**k.

That being said, Urdu/Hindi (Hindustani?) sounds a lot smoother and more poetic than Bangla which seems to have a unhealthy fetish with the "sh" sound. Seriously, does every word need to have a "sh" in it?

Ammar...lol, I guess I'm flattered to be semi-normal by your call. And yes, thanks for being one of my introductions to cricket and causing me to have lost some 5000 hours of sleep already (and untold man-hours of productivity)!

Zeeshan
July 26, 2012, 12:15 AM
I can see why he is banned :P

moona must have been really ticked off by that comment :p

Dilscoop
July 26, 2012, 01:35 AM
That was truly a Trigerazz or tigerezz, or w/e that dude's nick was, moment.

Sohel
July 26, 2012, 01:41 AM
I'm 45 and grew up in the US and Europe. In fact, before moving to the US at age 12, I spent only 5 years in Bangladesh. I come from a family of academics and professionals who have been settling in London, Chicago, Detroit, NYC and the San Francisco Bay Area since 1948. Ethnically, a part of my family has traceable Turko-Persian-Mughal roots, and I grew up listening to my paternal grandparents speaking 19th century Farsi at home. We have a large number of African, Irish, Anglo, Latino and Jewish Americans in the family and they and their children are related to us by soul and blood.

That being said, we are all ethoculturally Bangali, and proud citizens of Bangladesh, the US and the UK. There is a concerted effort in my family, especially my father's side of the family with Persian fair skin with sharp features and green/hazel/blue eyes, to look more Bangali by marrying Bangali men and women with beautiful darker skin and beautiful dark eyes. I am a product of such a union and before getting fat about 5 years ago, was considered hot because of my Bangali features. I want my children to be even more Bangali because I feel that I've missed out.

There is extreme emphasis in my family -- no matter where we are or what other cultural heritage we carry -- on getting to know our formidable spiritual, literary and musical tradition, rural roots, and fellow Bangalis and indigenous Bangladeshis outside our social circle. We have always been discouraged to make comments about anything we haven't deeply looked into and reflected upon. This is especially true of our heritage. Getting to know that heritage is critical to getting to know and accept oneself, and subsequently dealing with life's challenges without resorting to dysfunctional pathology and the shameful and embarrassing sublimation of that pathology. Then again none that matters to the deeply disturbed and the irretrievably stupid.

My biracial cousins, nephews and nieces -- their Black, White, Latino and Jewish blood notwithstanding -- ALL speak Bangla and spend enough time in Bangladesh doing productive stuff away from their families to connect to their roots. They defend Bangladesh and her Bangali as well as indigenous culture with decisive and erudite passion and vehemence. Most have either married Bangalis from Bangladesh or want to, unless they find a soulmate from another culture as I did on a couple of occasions. They don't deliberately go out there to breed the Bangali out of themselves ethnically or culturally.

My little niece Erin (8), born and raised in Brooklyn, speaks, reads and writes Bangla better than many English medium children in Bangladesh 3 times her age who have never lived abroad. Heck, she even speaks Noakhalillah. She's also into learning Irish Gaelic and Caribbean English and tires to avoid speaking English whenever she's in Bangladesh, Ireland or Barbados.

I am proud of them and proud of my family, and have ZERO respect for those who do not embrace their heritage and wish they were something else because of poorly concealed self loathing and callous ignorance of the incredible history and culture of Bangladesh. Bangladesh is better off without such tools and douchebags both here and in the uppity NRB community, many with direct links to dodgy Razakars, opportunists and cowards the country doesn't need anyway.

I LOVE the sound of Bangla. I LOVE the dark skin and the dark eyes and the flattish nose. I love our physical strength to carry twice our body weight all day long in fields, rivers, factories, ports and piers, and on the streets of out cities and small towns. I love our moral strength which enables us to make incredible sacrifices for our families and friends, and then smile and laugh at the end of the day. I love our courage to stand up to genocidal armies and brutal dictators, yet be peaceful and patient enough not to riot in the face of egregious disparity and injustice they face as the marginalized majority here. I love the truly balanced piety of our people that has decisively rejected sectarianism at the polls. I love Bangladesh, Bangalis and our indigenous ancestors because they NEVER FAIL TO INSPIRE ME to become a better person by trying to be more like them.

Glad to see BC has begun to clean house of racist and moronic elements hiding behind "honesty" ... :applause: :applause: :applause:

Zunaid
July 26, 2012, 01:43 AM
Glad to see BC has begun to clean house of racist and moronic elements hiding behind "honesty" ... :applause: :applause: :applause:

BC never stopped. All y'all have to help us clean our house.

Jadukor
July 26, 2012, 02:00 AM
I LOVE the sound of Bangla. I LOVE the dark skin and the dark eyes and the flattish nose. I love our physical strength to carry twice our body weight all day long in fields, rivers, factories, ports and piers, and the streets of out cities and small towns. I love our moral strength which enables us to make incredible sacrifices for our families and friends, and then smile and laugh at the end of the day. I love our courage to stand up to genocidal armies and brutal dictators, yet be peaceful and patient enough not to riot in the face of egregious disparity and injustice they face as the marginalized majority here. I love the true balanced piety of our people that has decisively rejected sectarianism at the polls. I love Bangladesh, Bangalis and our indigenous ancestors because they NEVER FAIL TO INSPIRE me to become a better person by trying to by more like them.


I have to admit even if i tried for a year I wouldn't be able to express my feelings for Bangladesh and Bangla as eloquently as you did in this post. Thank you on behalf of many of us for this post.

Zunaid
July 26, 2012, 02:09 AM
We are all biased. We are Bangalis after all.

However, my wife considers Bangali to be the most mellifluous of all the South Asian languages. She is NOT from that area but is intimately familiar with how Hindi/Bengali and South Indian languages sound. I am trying to convince her that Bangali trumps French - the fact that I have a great Parisian French accent does not help. Try saying Azerbaijan in a French accent to your better half.

Zunaid
July 26, 2012, 02:18 AM
We are all biased. We are Bangalis after all.

However, my wife considers Bangali to be the most mellifluous of all the South Asian languages. She is NOT from that area but is intimately familiar with how Hindi/Bengali and South Indian languages sound. I am trying to convince her that Bangali trumps French - the fact that I have a great Parisian French accent does not help. Try saying Azerbaijan in a French accent to your better half.

PS: Probably because I am short, dark, and have a pug nose is why my wife is enamored of Bangla.

Dilscoop
July 26, 2012, 02:25 AM
"Teaching your kids bangla" to "I wanna get a hold of a white chick" to some raciest remarks. smh

Sohel
July 26, 2012, 02:32 AM
I have to admit even if i tried for a year I wouldn't be able to express my feelings for Bangladesh and Bangla as eloquently as you did in this post. Thank you on behalf of many of us for this post.

Thank you for the kind words bro.

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/cjFjzsRopX4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Sohel
July 26, 2012, 03:50 AM
BC never stopped. All y'all have to help us clean our house.

True that. I meant we ought to less tolerant of generalized diatribes against our own country and people as well. At least as much as we are when it comes to other nations and peoples. BC has always been good at that BTW, but tends to cut over generalized and negative anti-Bangladesh and anti-Bangali posts more slack in comparison.

Now, people are free to opine based on the specific and narrow context of what they've seen, but need to be warned once terms like "Bangalis" or "Bangladeshis" are associated with a negative comment, when not used humorously.

There are 300 million Bangalies and 160 million Bangladeshis, and making a negative comment on such large groups based on what some see in themselves, or in their families, or in the miniscule percentage of the population one has the chance to observe, is racist and one of the best examples of panoramic retardation I can think of.

I say speak for yourself but spare the nation.

Kabir
July 26, 2012, 08:45 AM
Top post Sohel bhai. I usually don't read posts that long, but when it's you, I do read them.

It irritates me when someone, anyone, speaks of the looks of people. I bet you've heard a million times of "ishh meye ta eto kalo" by Bangladeshis and non-Bangladeshis alike. My usual question to people who say this is why what's wrong with kalo? The ink in the holy Quran is kalo, would you say the same thing about that? They usually get the point and shut up. The fact is, my dad is super kalo...and he's better looking and is a better person than most other men I've seen in my lifetime.

After living abroad for over a decade now, and spending most of that time alone (a lot of it doing soul searching)...I have a different level of respect for my culture and background. Unfortunately, in this materialistic world, I will most likely not have the opportunity to leave all these and go back to learn more about my culture until perhaps later in life.

What's funny is I never wanted to marry outside of Bangladesh. But it happened...because I felt deeply connected with the person I'm married to. We met in school and have been together ever since.

Hasan2k8
July 26, 2012, 09:01 AM
Yes of cause. I want my kids to know Bangla and Sylheti very well :) so when they visit BD hopefully they won't have any problems speaking to people :)

Crisis
July 26, 2012, 09:49 AM
Chomotkar post Sohel bhai. Ekebarey 10er modhdhey eksho.
Wish Erin the best of luck.

simon
July 26, 2012, 10:11 AM
I'll teach them hebru so they become rich.

Kabir
July 26, 2012, 10:22 AM
^^Careful, you don't wanna get banned.

simon
July 26, 2012, 11:10 AM
^^lol,but why?
Hebru speaking people are rich,it's a fact,no?
Besides we had a thread where we discussed why Jews are more powerful,because that's a fact too.
I didn't show any disrespect to them by that post I believe.:)
Why do the parents in BD are so desperate to send their kids to Eng medium? So that they become fluent in ENg and go to some developped English speaking country and have a better life.:-|

ahnaf
July 26, 2012, 12:28 PM
I'm 45 and grew up in the US and Europe. In fact, before moving to the US at age 12, I spent only 5 years in Bangladesh. I come from a family of academics and professionals who have been settling in London and in Chicago, Detroit, NYC and the San Francisco Bay Area since 1948. Ethnically, a part of my family has traceable Turko-Persian-Mughal roots, and I grew up listening to my paternal grandparents speaking 19th century Farsi at home. We have a large number of African, Irish, Anglo, Latino and Jewish Americans in the family and they and their children are related to us by soul and blood.

That being said, we are all ethoculturally Bangali, proud citizens of Bangladesh, the US and the UK. There is a concerted effort in my family, especially my father's side of the family with Persian fair skin with sharp features and green/hazel/blue eyes, to look more Bangali by marrying Bangali men and women with beautiful darker skin and beautiful dark eyes. I am a product of such a union and before getting fat about 5 years ago, was considered hot because of my Bangali features. I want my children to be even more Bangali because I feel that I've missed out.

There is extreme emphasis in my family -- no matter where we are or what other cultural heritage we carry -- on getting to know our formidable spiritual, literary and musical tradition, rural roots, and fellow Bangalis and indigenous Bangladeshis outside our social circle. We have always been discouraged to make comments about anything we haven't deeply looked into and reflected upon. This is especially true of our heritage. Getting to know that heritage is critical to getting to know and accept oneself, and subsequently dealing with life's challenges without resorting to dysfunctional pathology and the shameful and embarrassing sublimation of that pathology. Then again none that matters to the deeply disturbed and the irretrievably stupid.

My biracial cousins, nephews and nieces -- their Black, White, Latino and Jewish blood notwithstanding -- ALL speak Bangla and spend enough time in Bangladesh doing productive stuff away from their families to connect to their roots. They defend Bangladesh and her Bangali as well as indigenous culture with decisive and erudite passion and vehemence. Most have either married Bangalis from Bangladesh or want to, unless they find a soulmate from another culture as I did on a couple of occasions. They don't deliberately go out there to breed the Bangali out of themselves ethnically or culturally.

My little niece Erin (8), born and raised in Brooklyn, speaks, reads and writes Bangla better than many English medium children in Bangladesh 3 times her age who have never lived abroad. Heck, she even speaks Noakhalillah. She's also into learning Irish Gaelic and Caribbean English and tires to avoid speaking English whenever she's in Bangladesh, Ireland or Barbados.

I am proud of them and proud of my family, and have ZERO respect for those who do not embraced their heritage and wish they were something else because of poorly concealed self loathing and callous ignorance of the incredible history and culture of Bangladesh. Bangladesh is better off without such tools and douchebags both here and in the uppity NRB community, many with direct links to dodgy Razakar, opportunists and cowards the country doesn't need anyway.

I LOVE the sound of Bangla. I LOVE the dark skin and the dark eyes and the flattish nose. I love our physical strength to carry twice our body weight all day long in fields, rivers, factories, ports and piers, and on the streets of out cities and small towns. I love our moral strength which enables us to make incredible sacrifices for our families and friends, and then smile and laugh at the end of the day. I love our courage to stand up to genocidal armies and brutal dictators, yet be peaceful and patient enough not to riot in the face of egregious disparity and injustice they face as the marginalized majority here. I love the truly balanced piety of our people that has decisively rejected sectarianism at the polls. I love Bangladesh, Bangalis and our indigenous ancestors because they NEVER FAIL TO INSPIRE ME to become a better person by trying to be more like them.

Glad to see BC has begun to clean house of racist and moronic elements hiding behind "honesty" ... :applause: :applause: :applause:

Beautiful post sohel bhai..:-)
<br />Posted via BC Mobile Edition (Opera Mobile)

Kabir
July 26, 2012, 12:41 PM
^^lol,but why?


Coz BC is cleaning up the weed! That includes anyone passing a comment that's not liked by certain super users (not that I'm in agreement with those posts either) :)

Mav
July 26, 2012, 01:46 PM
As you know I have just finished my masters in Economics. I am considering a job in investment banking or maybe doing a PhD. Either way, to be frank, I see my long term future either here or in North America.

This made me think about the next generation. If I settle here, is it not better for my children to be wholly integrated and therefore to speak English and other European languages. I have not married yet, but may opt to marry outside the community for aesthetic reasons.

Those born/raised in the west, do you speak Bangla?

Really depends on you, how much do you respect your roots/history, if that is Bangladesh. Even if you were not born in Bangladesh, you should have respect to our history which is the only country in the world who fought to retain their mother language Bangla. And that was the start of the struggles and eventually the war in 71, which created Bangladesh.

So, if you respect, and are educated enough about our unparalleled history, You know the answer.

I lived in North America for 8 years, will go back and settle there too. My kids BETTER speak, read and write Bangla, I will make sure of that.

http://static.panoramio.com/photos/medium/76045438.jpg

Mav
July 26, 2012, 01:56 PM
Wow, you are lucky that this forum have mostly well mannered and educated smart people. Otherwise, you would have been laughed at your grade 5 level IQ comment. Good luck mate, find your beautiful, tall, fair wife and hope your honesty over patriotism ( stupidity over knowledge) take you far.

F6_Turbo
July 26, 2012, 01:59 PM
umm Brother Mav, the not so bright_tiger has already been banned.

mufi_02
July 26, 2012, 02:06 PM
Mods, if possible remove that post completely.

I loved Sohel bhai's response. Very well said. I feel the same but can never write or express the way he did.

Mav
July 26, 2012, 02:38 PM
umm Brother Mav, the not so bright_tiger has already been banned.

Ya just noticed.

BengaliPagol
July 26, 2012, 03:06 PM
Not only that, there are few other 'Language (Bangla) Schools in Sydney :

Marrickville Bangla Patshala

Lakemba Bangla School

Bangladeshi Community School

and few other organizations who run Bangla courses in public schools.


Yeah i heard Bangla is a HSC course? Or close to being one? Not too sure.

I think there is a Bangla school in Epping. Bangla schools in Sydney are spreading due to the support they are receiving from the Bangla community, which is good to see.

And also i think the Campbelltown Bangla School run eid prayers and stuff so they do a lot for the community.

RazabQ
July 26, 2012, 06:11 PM
To each his/her own.
My 3 kids born in USA and growing up exclusively here are fully bilingual. It was important to me and my wife because we love it when the kids communicate to their grandparents freely, because when they listen to a Hridoy Khan or Arnab song they understand, because they can sing K-e-kola, Khoye-khai at the back of the car along with Ferdousi Rahman and enjoy it, because I love hearing my 3 year old say "gondar", "shet bhaluk", "nischoi", because ...

It's not easy, requires persistence, but I'm convinced years down the road when they want to pick up a third language or visit Bangladesh on their own, they will thank us.

FaHiMa
July 26, 2012, 07:10 PM
I'm 45 and grew up in the US and Europe. In fact, before moving to the US at age 12, I spent only 5 years in Bangladesh. I come from a family of academics and professionals who have been settling in London and in Chicago, Detroit, NYC and the San Francisco Bay Area since 1948. Ethnically, a part of my family has traceable Turko-Persian-Mughal roots, and I grew up listening to my paternal grandparents speaking 19th century Farsi at home. We have a large number of African, Irish, Anglo, Latino and Jewish Americans in the family and they and their children are related to us by soul and blood.

That being said, we are all ethoculturally Bangali, proud citizens of Bangladesh, the US and the UK. There is a concerted effort in my family, especially my father's side of the family with Persian fair skin with sharp features and green/hazel/blue eyes, to look more Bangali by marrying Bangali men and women with beautiful darker skin and beautiful dark eyes. I am a product of such a union and before getting fat about 5 years ago, was considered hot because of my Bangali features. I want my children to be even more Bangali because I feel that I've missed out.

There is extreme emphasis in my family -- no matter where we are or what other cultural heritage we carry -- on getting to know our formidable spiritual, literary and musical tradition, rural roots, and fellow Bangalis and indigenous Bangladeshis outside our social circle. We have always been discouraged to make comments about anything we haven't deeply looked into and reflected upon. This is especially true of our heritage. Getting to know that heritage is critical to getting to know and accept oneself, and subsequently dealing with life's challenges without resorting to dysfunctional pathology and the shameful and embarrassing sublimation of that pathology. Then again none that matters to the deeply disturbed and the irretrievably stupid.

My biracial cousins, nephews and nieces -- their Black, White, Latino and Jewish blood notwithstanding -- ALL speak Bangla and spend enough time in Bangladesh doing productive stuff away from their families to connect to their roots. They defend Bangladesh and her Bangali as well as indigenous culture with decisive and erudite passion and vehemence. Most have either married Bangalis from Bangladesh or want to, unless they find a soulmate from another culture as I did on a couple of occasions. They don't deliberately go out there to breed the Bangali out of themselves ethnically or culturally.

My little niece Erin (8), born and raised in Brooklyn, speaks, reads and writes Bangla better than many English medium children in Bangladesh 3 times her age who have never lived abroad. Heck, she even speaks Noakhalillah. She's also into learning Irish Gaelic and Caribbean English and tires to avoid speaking English whenever she's in Bangladesh, Ireland or Barbados.

I am proud of them and proud of my family, and have ZERO respect for those who do not embraced their heritage and wish they were something else because of poorly concealed self loathing and callous ignorance of the incredible history and culture of Bangladesh. Bangladesh is better off without such tools and douchebags both here and in the uppity NRB community, many with direct links to dodgy Razakar, opportunists and cowards the country doesn't need anyway.

I LOVE the sound of Bangla. I LOVE the dark skin and the dark eyes and the flattish nose. I love our physical strength to carry twice our body weight all day long in fields, rivers, factories, ports and piers, and on the streets of out cities and small towns. I love our moral strength which enables us to make incredible sacrifices for our families and friends, and then smile and laugh at the end of the day. I love our courage to stand up to genocidal armies and brutal dictators, yet be peaceful and patient enough not to riot in the face of egregious disparity and injustice they face as the marginalized majority here. I love the truly balanced piety of our people that has decisively rejected sectarianism at the polls. I love Bangladesh, Bangalis and our indigenous ancestors because they NEVER FAIL TO INSPIRE ME to become a better person by trying to be more like them.

Glad to see BC has begun to clean house of racist and moronic elements hiding behind "honesty" ... :applause: :applause: :applause:

WOW! :wow:
Beatifully put... :clap:

Would you mind if I shared this with a couple of friends? lol :P Credit, will ofcourse be given where its due.

Nasif
July 26, 2012, 07:23 PM
I'm 45 and grew up in the US and Europe. In fact, before moving to the US at age 12, I spent only 5 years in Bangladesh. I come from a family of academics and professionals who have been settling in London and in Chicago, Detroit, NYC and the San Francisco Bay Area since 1948. ............

Thanks Sohel bhai for sharing your life experiences. It is an enlightening read.

I have +1'ed :up:

Sauron
July 26, 2012, 08:22 PM
As you know I have just finished my masters in Economics. I am considering a job in investment banking or maybe doing a PhD. Either way, to be frank, I see my long term future either here or in North America.

This made me think about the next generation. If I settle here, is it not better for my children to be wholly integrated and therefore to speak English and other European languages. I have not married yet, but may opt to marry outside the community for aesthetic reasons.

Those born/raised in the west, do you speak Bangla?

Are you for real??? I am honestly blown away by your lowest common denominator basement crass mentality. I had an idea that some folks may have this sort of mentality, but I had no idea that there are folks that will actually think it's okay to verbalize this crass state of self-esteem.

Anyway, just saw that you are "banned". Moderators are, after all, good for something ... ;)

oronnya
July 26, 2012, 08:23 PM
Not going through the whole thread but who won't want their kids to speak bengali ?

oronnya
July 26, 2012, 08:26 PM
oh never mind just found one.. woww.. :o

Antora
July 26, 2012, 09:00 PM
I'm 45 and grew up in the US and Europe. In fact, before moving to the US at age 12, I spent only 5 years in Bangladesh. I come from a family of academics and professionals who have been settling in London and in Chicago, Detroit, NYC and the San Francisco Bay Area since 1948. Ethnically, a part of my family has traceable Turko-Persian-Mughal roots, and I grew up listening to my paternal grandparents speaking 19th century Farsi at home. We have a large number of African, Irish, Anglo, Latino and Jewish Americans in the family and they and their children are related to us by soul and blood.

That being said, we are all ethoculturally Bangali, proud citizens of Bangladesh, the US and the UK. There is a concerted effort in my family, especially my father's side of the family with Persian fair skin with sharp features and green/hazel/blue eyes, to look more Bangali by marrying Bangali men and women with beautiful darker skin and beautiful dark eyes. I am a product of such a union and before getting fat about 5 years ago, was considered hot because of my Bangali features. I want my children to be even more Bangali because I feel that I've missed out.

There is extreme emphasis in my family -- no matter where we are or what other cultural heritage we carry -- on getting to know our formidable spiritual, literary and musical tradition, rural roots, and fellow Bangalis and indigenous Bangladeshis outside our social circle. We have always been discouraged to make comments about anything we haven't deeply looked into and reflected upon. This is especially true of our heritage. Getting to know that heritage is critical to getting to know and accept oneself, and subsequently dealing with life's challenges without resorting to dysfunctional pathology and the shameful and embarrassing sublimation of that pathology. Then again none that matters to the deeply disturbed and the irretrievably stupid.

My biracial cousins, nephews and nieces -- their Black, White, Latino and Jewish blood notwithstanding -- ALL speak Bangla and spend enough time in Bangladesh doing productive stuff away from their families to connect to their roots. They defend Bangladesh and her Bangali as well as indigenous culture with decisive and erudite passion and vehemence. Most have either married Bangalis from Bangladesh or want to, unless they find a soulmate from another culture as I did on a couple of occasions. They don't deliberately go out there to breed the Bangali out of themselves ethnically or culturally.

My little niece Erin (8), born and raised in Brooklyn, speaks, reads and writes Bangla better than many English medium children in Bangladesh 3 times her age who have never lived abroad. Heck, she even speaks Noakhalillah. She's also into learning Irish Gaelic and Caribbean English and tires to avoid speaking English whenever she's in Bangladesh, Ireland or Barbados.

I am proud of them and proud of my family, and have ZERO respect for those who do not embraced their heritage and wish they were something else because of poorly concealed self loathing and callous ignorance of the incredible history and culture of Bangladesh. Bangladesh is better off without such tools and douchebags both here and in the uppity NRB community, many with direct links to dodgy Razakars, opportunists and cowards the country doesn't need anyway.

I LOVE the sound of Bangla. I LOVE the dark skin and the dark eyes and the flattish nose. I love our physical strength to carry twice our body weight all day long in fields, rivers, factories, ports and piers, and on the streets of out cities and small towns. I love our moral strength which enables us to make incredible sacrifices for our families and friends, and then smile and laugh at the end of the day. I love our courage to stand up to genocidal armies and brutal dictators, yet be peaceful and patient enough not to riot in the face of egregious disparity and injustice they face as the marginalized majority here. I love the truly balanced piety of our people that has decisively rejected sectarianism at the polls. I love Bangladesh, Bangalis and our indigenous ancestors because they NEVER FAIL TO INSPIRE ME to become a better person by trying to be more like them.

Glad to see BC has begun to clean house of racist and moronic elements hiding behind "honesty" ... :applause: :applause: :applause:

Wow! That's a beautiful post :)

Antora
July 26, 2012, 09:05 PM
Yeah i heard Bangla is a HSC course? Or close to being one? Not too sure.

I think there is a Bangla school in Epping. Bangla schools in Sydney are spreading due to the support they are receiving from the Bangla community, which is good to see.

And also i think the Campbelltown Bangla School run eid prayers and stuff so they do a lot for the community.

Bangla was supposed to be a HSC and VCE course (victoria and NSW students put together) but they didn't allow it even thoug vic and nsw put together had 15 + students :( last year, so I ( along with a few of my friends) wasn't able to sit it - after all that hard work :facepalm:. But we were able to sit it as a VET course ( only 10% mark gets added) and I think so were the NSW kids :)
It used to be a HSC/VCE course a few years back but due to lack of students at that level (15 being the minimum required), its no longer one - not sure about NSW this year though.

al Furqaan
July 26, 2012, 09:21 PM
I LOVE the sound of Bangla. I LOVE the dark skin and the dark eyes and the flattish nose.

Sohel bhai...I'm not sure that those physical features should be attributed as being stereotypically Bangali, at least not today. Definitely these are features which are common to those of Dravidian ancestory - which includes ALL Indians and even ALL of our "Aryan" friends in Pakistan.

But due to whatever and all reason, Bangalis are, without doubt, THE ABSOLUTE most diverse appearing ethnic group in existence. Brazilians would challenge us, except that Brazilian is a nationality subsisting of several races, whereas Bangali is a single ethnic class. In fact, my old Pakistani roomate - who thought I was African-American - was convinced that Bangalis were like Brazilians - you could think they are every race, but "brown". I agreed and pointed to the FACT that Bangalis could be mistaken for being Caucasian, white Arab, brown Arab, Latino, African American, Persian, Pakistani, Indian, Sub-Saharan African, and lastly Bangali itself!

Thus, its my opinion that there is no set of physical features that can be assigned as "Bangali" because we are all encompassing and diverse like the rainbow.

iDumb
July 26, 2012, 10:17 PM
Watch out man, you might get banned!
I don't know why I care to warn you given our past beef, but I guess everybody adds color to this grand old forum.

heh! look who got banned. not me. my post still there. you know why? cuz that guy deserved worse response...compare to others i was very mild......was simply pointing out his trolling..... i m one...so i know how to recognize one.

that kid picking wrong audience.....BC members are very educated, successful, liberal and with strong identities.... this isnt your geramer audience.....impressed by utterance of 2 englsh words.....

he chose the wrong forum...he should preach this in bangladeshi train station...

Sohel
July 26, 2012, 10:17 PM
@Asaad: The "dark skin and the dark eyes and the flattish nose" comment was a rhetorical response to the stereotype, AND also indicative of my personal preference. That being said, the stereotype in this case definitely addresses the norm rather than the exceptions that exist. Those exceptions aren't as few as we think, but not that widespread either. I have green eyes as do many people in my family. Some also have hazel and blue eyes. My late father and brother look positively Turko-Persian in their facial and physical features and complexion, way beyond just South Asian "phaursha" but definitely not Northern European, and my mother looks more Burmese with the family's indigenous Tripura lineage shining through. Her father was mistaken for and treated like a black man when he was doing his PhD at the University of Chicago under Einstein and Bose in 1948. My paternal grandfather, a structural engineer out of Oxford, was repeatedly mistaken for a Greek/Anatolian while he fought in the British Army during WWII in Europe and Burma.

Re-posting my immediate family's picture here.

http://s17.postimage.org/cw5cb4gjj/FAMILY_PIC.jpg

http://img856.imageshack.us/img856/4076/dadub.jpg
Maternal grandfather Bose Professor Dr. Abdul Matin Chaudhury, University of Chicago, 1948.

Now, none of these examples is the "norm" here in Bangladesh at first glance, but not as rare as people think either. If we address the norm, there is definitely a "Bangali chehara" that is distinctly different from other North Indians or Southeast Asians for good reason. We're located as the cusp of these two regions and our language as well culture with its strong Magadhi-Prakrit and Tibeto-Burman (the affluent region east of the Meghna river) roots. You don't have to agree with me but will definitely see where I'm coming from once you spend enough time traveling around the country to truly discover and connect to your roots just as I did.

Here's the Wikipedia description of who we are, and I agree with it wholeheartedly:

The Bengali people are an ethnic community native to the historic region of Bengal (now divided between Bangladesh and India) in South Asia. They speak Bengali (বাংলা Bangla), which is an Indo-Aryan language of the eastern Indian subcontinent, evolved from the Magadhi Prakrit and Sanskrit languages. In their native language, they are referred to as বাঙালী (pronounced Bangali). They primarily belong to Indo-Aryan and Mongolo-Dravidian stock, and are closely related to Austro-Asiatic, Dravidian, Assamese, Sinhalese, Munda, and Tibeto-Burman linguistic/ethnic stocks. As such, Bengalis are a homogeneous but considerably diverse ethnic group with heterogeneous origins. They are the second largest single ethnic group in the world

READ MORE (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bengali_people)

@Fahima and others: Thank you for your kind words and feel free to share the original post (I've edited a few things). A healthy dose of justifiable pride in who we are, in ALL we are, doesn't lead to the proverbial fall. In fact, it is likely to lead to greater heights for individuals, communities and our nation provided we're not being an arrogant [insert expletive of choice here]s about it.

iDumb
July 26, 2012, 10:22 PM
only a moron would be proud about her sister marrying an australian....

if my sister married a nondeshi, i m gonna stop visiting her... hell my sister shouldnt marry anybody.... no one is good enough..

who is proud of their sisters marriage ...such an odd thing to be proud of..

Jadukor
July 26, 2012, 10:26 PM
who is proud of their sisters marriage ...such an odd thing to be proud of..
hahaha classic dialogue...

Kabir
July 27, 2012, 04:08 AM
Re-posting my immediate family's picture here.

...

Here's the Wikipedia description of who we are, and I agree with it wholeheartedly:


Dude, you look more gangstaa than I had imagined. That dari gives you the chinese morol look...but it's oddly cool!

As for wiki - I've been taught to always take it with a grain of salt. Although, I liked what I read in the part you quoted.

Crisis
July 27, 2012, 05:23 AM
only a moron would be proud about her sister marrying an australian....

if my sister married a nondeshi, i m gonna stop visiting her... hell my sister shouldnt marry anybody.... no one is good enough..

who is proud of their sisters marriage ...such an odd thing to be proud of..

Marhaba! Marhaba! I am bride-hunting at the moment.

BengaliPagol
July 27, 2012, 05:37 AM
Bangla was supposed to be a HSC and VCE course (victoria and NSW students put together) but they didn't allow it even thoug vic and nsw put together had 15 + students :( last year, so I ( along with a few of my friends) wasn't able to sit it - after all that hard work :facepalm:. But we were able to sit it as a VET course ( only 10% mark gets added) and I think so were the NSW kids :)
It used to be a HSC/VCE course a few years back but due to lack of students at that level (15 being the minimum required), its no longer one - not sure about NSW this year though.

After all the hard work only 10% of the marks got added. I will sorry for you.

Antora
July 27, 2012, 06:55 AM
After all the hard work only 10% of the marks got added. I will sorry for you.

Hahah, ye it was a bit annoying. But the assignments weren't difficult so, I wasn't too fussed! :S

Leafs PWN
July 27, 2012, 08:49 AM
I'm 45 and grew up in the US and Europe. In fact, before moving to the US at age 12, I spent only 5 years in Bangladesh. I come from a family of academics and professionals who have been settling in London and in Chicago, Detroit, NYC and the San Francisco Bay Area since 1948. Ethnically, a part of my family has traceable Turko-Persian-Mughal roots, and I grew up listening to my paternal grandparents speaking 19th century Farsi at home. We have a large number of African, Irish, Anglo, Latino and Jewish Americans in the family and they and their children are related to us by soul and blood.

That being said, we are all ethoculturally Bangali, proud citizens of Bangladesh, the US and the UK. There is a concerted effort in my family, especially my father's side of the family with Persian fair skin with sharp features and green/hazel/blue eyes, to look more Bangali by marrying Bangali men and women with beautiful darker skin and beautiful dark eyes. I am a product of such a union and before getting fat about 5 years ago, was considered hot because of my Bangali features. I want my children to be even more Bangali because I feel that I've missed out.

There is extreme emphasis in my family -- no matter where we are or what other cultural heritage we carry -- on getting to know our formidable spiritual, literary and musical tradition, rural roots, and fellow Bangalis and indigenous Bangladeshis outside our social circle. We have always been discouraged to make comments about anything we haven't deeply looked into and reflected upon. This is especially true of our heritage. Getting to know that heritage is critical to getting to know and accept oneself, and subsequently dealing with life's challenges without resorting to dysfunctional pathology and the shameful and embarrassing sublimation of that pathology. Then again none that matters to the deeply disturbed and the irretrievably stupid.

My biracial cousins, nephews and nieces -- their Black, White, Latino and Jewish blood notwithstanding -- ALL speak Bangla and spend enough time in Bangladesh doing productive stuff away from their families to connect to their roots. They defend Bangladesh and her Bangali as well as indigenous culture with decisive and erudite passion and vehemence. Most have either married Bangalis from Bangladesh or want to, unless they find a soulmate from another culture as I did on a couple of occasions. They don't deliberately go out there to breed the Bangali out of themselves ethnically or culturally.

My little niece Erin (8), born and raised in Brooklyn, speaks, reads and writes Bangla better than many English medium children in Bangladesh 3 times her age who have never lived abroad. Heck, she even speaks Noakhalillah. She's also into learning Irish Gaelic and Caribbean English and tires to avoid speaking English whenever she's in Bangladesh, Ireland or Barbados.

I am proud of them and proud of my family, and have ZERO respect for those who do not embraced their heritage and wish they were something else because of poorly concealed self loathing and callous ignorance of the incredible history and culture of Bangladesh. Bangladesh is better off without such tools and douchebags both here and in the uppity NRB community, many with direct links to dodgy Razakars, opportunists and cowards the country doesn't need anyway.

I LOVE the sound of Bangla. I LOVE the dark skin and the dark eyes and the flattish nose. I love our physical strength to carry twice our body weight all day long in fields, rivers, factories, ports and piers, and on the streets of out cities and small towns. I love our moral strength which enables us to make incredible sacrifices for our families and friends, and then smile and laugh at the end of the day. I love our courage to stand up to genocidal armies and brutal dictators, yet be peaceful and patient enough not to riot in the face of egregious disparity and injustice they face as the marginalized majority here. I love the truly balanced piety of our people that has decisively rejected sectarianism at the polls. I love Bangladesh, Bangalis and our indigenous ancestors because they NEVER FAIL TO INSPIRE ME to become a better person by trying to be more like them.

Glad to see BC has begun to clean house of racist and moronic elements hiding behind "honesty" ... :applause: :applause: :applause:

:applause:

Great, great post. I loathe the people who don't think it's "important" enough to teach their kids about our culture.

I believe retaining Bangla culture in foreign countries completely depends on the parents, and their efforts. For example, my cousins, both of whom were born here, speak fluent Bangla, and cherish our culture. In contrast, I've seen many friends in high school, university who came here around age 10, and try to pass off as not knowing Bangla due to "cultural" pressures. It's all a matter of how things play out at home.

No matter what culture my woman will be from, my children will be learning Bangla.

al Furqaan
July 27, 2012, 08:19 PM
Sohel bhai definitely agree with the wiki description.

cricket_king
August 4, 2012, 11:47 PM
This is quite an interesting discussion. As a Bangladeshi raised in Australia, I've noted that 99% (no exaggeration) of my generation raised here generally cannot speak Bangla well at all. Those who can, either choose not to, or speak absolutely uneducated "graam-esque" Bangla. Obviously their parents weren't taught "shuddho" Bangla. The families here are generally more concerned with Islam than their country. The kids will attend Arabic school, but not Bangla school.

I'm extremely lucky that my parents are as patriotic as they are, and strictly speak with my younger sister and I in Bangla at home. Speaking English with parents is strictly forbidden in my family, and I never really understood why until I was mature enough. Hence my attachment to Bangladesh is something that Bangladeshis here just don't understand, and as a consequence, I have very few Bangladeshi close friends in Australia. On a side note, being able to speak and sing in Bangla does prove to be a quite a hit with Aunties and Uncles, I must admit.

And yes, it is an absolute necessity that my kids learn Bangla and converse with me in Bangla.

Sohel
August 5, 2012, 01:15 AM
^It is all about the parents. Like you, I too am lucky to have great ones who take pride in what we are :)

Naimul_Hd
August 5, 2012, 05:29 AM
And yes, it is an absolute necessity that my kids learn Bangla and converse with me in Bangla.

:up::up::up: