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adamnsu
June 27, 2018, 03:37 AM
Hi and Salam to all.

I just thought of having a thread to discuss about our kids and how we are bringing them up.

Allhamdullilah I have been blessed with a boy who has turned 7 this year. He was born in the UK, however I always make him aware of his Bangladeshi heritage.

At home we speak to him mostly in Bangla. He understands alot but we encourage him more to answer.

I and my brother in laws practise playing cricket with him back yard. Maybe next year I might put him in a cricket club for proper coaching InshahAllah. We will be taking him to watch his first game next year at the World Cup.

His favourite player is Shakib Al Hassan, because he watched his first match on tv against New Zealand where he had a brilliant innings.

One World
June 27, 2018, 07:23 AM
Mine is turning 14 this August, he is good at multiple sports.

But currently I am a bit worried about his inclination to online gaming, youtube etc. This is becoming a challenge.

adamnsu
June 27, 2018, 07:57 AM
Mine is turning 14 this August, he is good at multiple sports.

But currently I am a bit worried about his inclination to online gaming, youtube etc. This is becoming a challenge.

Advance Birthday wishes.

What kind of sports does your son play?

I think swimming is the most essential thing. I got my son to swimming classes when he was 3 years.

Yes the online world and social media can be such a rough place for kids. I am studying on how to deal with this issue when my son starts using such platforms.

We have an youtube app that is child friendly.

I allow my son to play games but not online. He enjoys the lego games and Grand Turismo. I really want to get a Raspberry Pi so we can both play the classic games.

DinRaat.
June 27, 2018, 08:27 AM
Mine is turning 14 this August, he is good at multiple sports.

But currently I am a bit worried about his inclination to online gaming, youtube etc. This is becoming a challenge.

Break his console and introduce him to programming.

tonmoy.dhaka
June 27, 2018, 08:47 AM
Is there any kid that plays with action figure these days? I dont know if it is a good or a bad thing, but born in 84 and growing up in 90's I used to love the He-Man toys (used to have to wait for my birthdays for my mom to buy me a new character). I know it is not programming or anything intellectual, but it helps kids to develop creative minds according to my folks. May be I am wrong.

adamnsu
June 27, 2018, 08:51 AM
Break his console and introduce him to programming.

Programming is very good advice although the former isnt :D

adamnsu
June 27, 2018, 08:56 AM
Is there any kid that plays with action figure these days? I dont know if it is a good or a bad thing, but born in 84 and growing up in 90's I used to love the He-Man toys (used to have to wait for my birthdays for my mom to buy me a new character). I know it is not programming or anything intellectual, but it helps kids to develop creative minds according to my folks. May be I am wrong.

I used to have a He-man too, and I loved that little micro comic they used to give along with it. I was looking for one myself a couple of years ago. Wanted to remind me of my childhood.

My son plays with his action figures and some of his friends do too. Among his collection Iron Man, Hulk, TMNT and Transformers. He has three sizes of Iron man and loves that thing. That is the action figure I like the least. But nowdays kids have so many choices. I think its important as these things make children create their own world and open their mind.

bujhee kom
June 27, 2018, 09:41 AM
Very good thread!

Adam bhaiya, One World bhaiya, Tonmoy and Dinraat,

Since your children are still very young: The following will be my suggestions (based on things that interested me as a child and an young adult, and still do and helped shape my life).

Comics
Lego
Drawing/painting - After school classes?
Any kind of crafts (after school/community classes?)
Gardening- plants - fauna and flora
Pets - Small fish tank- few fishes and aquatic plants/cats, dogs or rabbits adopted from a shelter

Music playing: instruments: In the West - violin, piano. and also maybe introduce tabla and harmonium and sitar/tanpura if possible.

Now I understand all of these won't work on all kids - some will, some will not.
Pets and plants will teach compassion and caring for another living being, possible rise of a conscience to help a (the) helpless.

Bicycle and swimming are great! Any sports and martial arts would be great. Adam bhaiya, you already started cricket with our bhaitja, that is great.
Teach them to make their own food at a very early age.

Teach them to stand up for the weak and down (in the society). Teach them to love.

Start getting them into geography and have encourage them to read books, stories - whether very young or not - stories with illustrations.

Collction hobbies: stamp and coins. die cast toy cars.

i still do all of the above. + I also do model trains (HO scale). One world bhaiya's son can start model train, since he is at the perfect age for that. Adam bhaiya's one may be a few years later.
Make model planes, ships, wooden boat. Radio control flying styrofoam planes.

I do all of the above except that I do not have any RC planes and my wife and I do not have a dog now, not anymore.

adamnsu
June 27, 2018, 09:53 AM
Very good thread!

Adam bhaiya, One World bhaiya, Tonmoy and Dinraat,

Since your children) are still very young: The following will be my suggestion (based on things that interested me and still do and helped shaped my life).

Comics
Lego
Drawing/painting - After school classes?
Any kind of crafts (after school/community classes?)
Gardening- plants - fauna and flora
Pets - Small fish tank- few fishes and aquatic plants/cats, dogs or rabbits adopted from a shelter

Music playing: instruments: In the West - violin, piano. and also maybe introduce tabla and harmonium and sitar/tanpura if possible.

Now I understand all of these won't work on all kids - some will, some will not.
Pets and plants will teach compassion and caring for another living being, possible rise of a conscience to help a (the) helpless.

Bicycle and swimming are great! Any sports and martial arts would be great. Adam bhaiya, you already started cricket with our bhaitja, that is great.
Teach them to make their own food at a very early age.

Teach them to stand up for the weak and down (in the society). Teach them to love.

Some excellent suggestions from Bujhee Kom bro which is Ironic to his nick as he understands alot :D

Lego is really important I agree. My son waters his grand parents massive garden from a very young age. I think in our home we will start to grow some plants , especially ones that bears fruits and vegetable.

My wife wants to get a Hamster for him, but I hate pets.

Yes musical instruments I think are important as I think it enriches one life as well and helps concentration.

I have collected some Asterix and TinTin comics which I will share with him soon. But tbh comics are not encouraged in the UK. Also it is not widely available. But during my childhood Archie and Billu/Chacha Chowdhury would give me much pleasure.

Thanks for reminding me about his own cooking. But also important is to do the shopping.

DinRaat.
June 27, 2018, 09:43 PM
Programming is very good advice although the former isnt :D

Nah he if wants to game, introduce him to PC gaming, even though it's a niche, it still has all the triple A titles, but most importantly he will be exposed to the computing environment. If he does(obviously he will cause we are Bengalis) go to uni, he will have a nice foothold when it comes to using computers.

DinRaat.
June 27, 2018, 09:43 PM
Very good thread!

Adam bhaiya, One World bhaiya, Tonmoy and Dinraat,

Since your children are still very young: The following will be my suggestions (based on things that interested me as a child and an young adult, and still do and helped shape my life).

Comics
Lego
Drawing/painting - After school classes?
Any kind of crafts (after school/community classes?)
Gardening- plants - fauna and flora
Pets - Small fish tank- few fishes and aquatic plants/cats, dogs or rabbits adopted from a shelter

Music playing: instruments: In the West - violin, piano. and also maybe introduce tabla and harmonium and sitar/tanpura if possible.

Now I understand all of these won't work on all kids - some will, some will not.
Pets and plants will teach compassion and caring for another living being, possible rise of a conscience to help a (the) helpless.

Bicycle and swimming are great! Any sports and martial arts would be great. Adam bhaiya, you already started cricket with our bhaitja, that is great.
Teach them to make their own food at a very early age.

Teach them to stand up for the weak and down (in the society). Teach them to love.

Start getting them into geography and have encourage them to read books, stories - whether very young or not - stories with illustrations.

Collction hobbies: stamp and coins. die cast toy cars.

i still do all of the above. + I also do model trains (HO scale). One world bhaiya's son can start model train, since he is at the perfect age for that. Adam bhaiya's one may be a few years later.
Make model planes, ships, wooden boat. Radio control flying styrofoam planes.

I do all of the above except that I do not have any RC planes and my wife and I do not have a dog now, not anymore.

I don't have kids, heck I'm not even married yet.

adamnsu
June 29, 2018, 03:51 AM
Nah he if wants to game, introduce him to PC gaming, even though it's a niche, it still has all the triple A titles, but most importantly he will be exposed to the computing environment. If he does(obviously he will cause we are Bengalis) go to uni, he will have a nice foothold when it comes to using computers.

Are there any specific games you recommend?

DinRaat.
June 29, 2018, 05:08 AM
Are there any specific games you recommend?

Try to get him into chess, I know it sounds old fashioned, but chess really forces you to think, analytically and think ahead.

But for PC games, I started with racing games, then I learnt about piracy, watched YouTube videos, and started pirating my games. You would want him to be familiar with computers, the world is shifting to the digital age, everything is computerized.

NOT ENCOURAGING PIRACY HERE, YOU SHOULD OBVIOUSLY SUPPORT DEVELOPERS.

Games I recommend.

Need For Speed Franchise.(No violence)
Far Cry Franchise(little violence less than Call of Duty)
Elders Scrolls(becareful with this one, it can get him hooked very fast)

One more thing, make sure in school, try to put extra emphasis on Maths, Have you asked him what he wants to be when he grows up if its along the lines of Doctor,Engineer or Scientist, make sure he FOCUSES on math alot.
Till this day, I see first years fail all there uni level math subjects due to incompetence and preparation. I know he is only 14, but its crucial you prioritize math, before other subjects, since it is most widely used at a tertiary level.

bujhee kom
June 29, 2018, 08:46 AM
I don't have kids, heck I'm not even married yet.

Arrey Dinraat miah bhai, I know you are not married yet...but I thought you have already become an abbu!

aklemalp
June 29, 2018, 11:58 AM
Try to get him into chess, I know it sounds old fashioned, but chess really forces you to think, analytically and think ahead.

But for PC games, I started with racing games, then I learnt about piracy, watched YouTube videos, and started pirating my games. You would want him to be familiar with computers, the world is shifting to the digital age, everything is computerized.

NOT ENCOURAGING PIRACY HERE, YOU SHOULD OBVIOUSLY SUPPORT DEVELOPERS.

Games I recommend.

Need For Speed Franchise.(No violence)
Far Cry Franchise(little violence less than Call of Duty)
Elders Scrolls(becareful with this one, it can get him hooked very fast)

One more thing, make sure in school, try to put extra emphasis on Maths, Have you asked him what he wants to be when he grows up if its along the lines of Doctor,Engineer or Scientist, make sure he FOCUSES on math alot.
Till this day, I see first years fail all there uni level math subjects due to incompetence and preparation. I know he is only 14, but its crucial you prioritize math, before other subjects, since it is most widely used at a tertiary level.

At what age do they start hacking?

One World
June 29, 2018, 01:19 PM
Advance Birthday wishes.

What kind of sports does your son play?



Baseball, Soccer, Basketball

Interestingly every season he participates his team somehow ends up at the top

DinRaat.
June 30, 2018, 06:25 AM
Arrey Dinraat miah bhai, I know you are not married yet...but I thought you have already become an abbu!

Gotta keep it halal. ;)

But seriously,I am turning 25 soon and yet I still have habits of a 18 yr old(watching cartoons, playing mmorpg etc)
I havent really considered getting married. Also got a job recently too, haven't really found the right person.

adamnsu
July 2, 2018, 03:08 AM
Baseball, Soccer, Basketball

Interestingly every season he participates his team somehow ends up at the top

Wow amazing. Hope he keeps it up. out of the 3 which do you think might me most important for a kid?

adamnsu
July 2, 2018, 03:12 AM
Try to get him into chess, I know it sounds old fashioned, but chess really forces you to think, analytically and think ahead.

But for PC games, I started with racing games, then I learnt about piracy, watched YouTube videos, and started pirating my games. You would want him to be familiar with computers, the world is shifting to the digital age, everything is computerized.

NOT ENCOURAGING PIRACY HERE, YOU SHOULD OBVIOUSLY SUPPORT DEVELOPERS.

Games I recommend.

Need For Speed Franchise.(No violence)
Far Cry Franchise(little violence less than Call of Duty)
Elders Scrolls(becareful with this one, it can get him hooked very fast)

One more thing, make sure in school, try to put extra emphasis on Maths, Have you asked him what he wants to be when he grows up if its along the lines of Doctor,Engineer or Scientist, make sure he FOCUSES on math alot.
Till this day, I see first years fail all there uni level math subjects due to incompetence and preparation. I know he is only 14, but its crucial you prioritize math, before other subjects, since it is most widely used at a tertiary level.

Some good points here. I am trying to get those Pi gadgets to play retro games the ones which I have enjoyed in the past like contra, streetfighter, etc etc.

BBC has alot of good programmes which build higher skilled career awareness. But we are now focusing on developing his skills on maths which he enjoys.

One World
July 2, 2018, 06:50 AM
Gotta keep it halal. ;)

But seriously,I am turning 25 soon and yet I still have habits of a 18 yr old(watching cartoons, playing mmorpg etc)
I havent really considered getting married. Also got a job recently too, haven't really found the right person.

I think this is a thread for parents, please come back when you are 18+ ;)

Shingara
July 3, 2018, 03:15 AM
Have you bought your son Adorsholipi ?
Do you make him watch Sisimpur or Mina ?

Why not ???

adamnsu
July 3, 2018, 05:39 AM
Have you bought your son Adorsholipi ?
Do you make him watch Sisimpur or Mina ?

Why not ???

Could you please elaborate why these are essentials for boys? How have your children benefited from these things?

DinRaat.
July 3, 2018, 06:42 PM
Could you please elaborate why these are essentials for boys? How have your children benefited from these things?

I think he is joking around.

mufi_02
July 3, 2018, 06:55 PM
Could you please elaborate why these are essentials for boys? How have your children benefited from these things?

Adorsholipi is good if you want yor kids to learn Bangla. That’s how we all started in kindergarten and home. O te Ojogor, I te Idur.

Mina is a good educational cartoon teaching family and societal values.

So these are not bad suggestions for anyone who wants to raise their kids with some Bengali language and heritage.

iDumb
July 4, 2018, 01:18 AM
Be single be happy. Don't be a moron . And be the right type of single. Not a Chagol one.

adamnsu
July 4, 2018, 04:11 AM
Adorsholipi is good if you want yor kids to learn Bangla. That’s how we all started in kindergarten and home. O te Ojogor, I te Idur.

Mina is a good educational cartoon teaching family and societal values.

So these are not bad suggestions for anyone who wants to raise their kids with some Bengali language and heritage.

I used to read Amar Boi when I was abroad. Those are also decent books. I had to learn because I was going to do my education in Bangladesh. But apart from the sentimental value, I wonder how important it is for a child being brought up abroad it is to learn Bangla. For a child of Muslim faith I think Arabic might be more useful.

IMO I think learning heritage for a child is extremely much more important. But I think sitting down with a child and telling them about Bangladesh helps alot as well.

That being said, Mina was a decent cartoon with much moral values.


I think he is joking around.

Perhaps. But I was asking for clarification :D

Shingara
July 4, 2018, 11:15 AM
Adam bhai, ami kintu serious silam. Bangla shikhkhar beparey ami gafiloti pochondo kori na.
Amar jonmo ekhaney kintu amar baap-ma Adorsholipi ar Bangla medium er class 1 - 6 er shob boi ekhaney niye ashsilo. Tarpor prottek summer vacationey, ami oi boigua portam ar copy korey lekhalekhi o korechi.
Tarpor ek bosor deshey silam GCSE deoar por. Tokhon band shongeet, natok, cinema, tin goenda , Feluda - eishober shathey aro familair holam.

Antora
July 6, 2018, 02:57 AM
I used to read Amar Boi when I was abroad. Those are also decent books. I had to learn because I was going to do my education in Bangladesh. But apart from the sentimental value, I wonder how important it is for a child being brought up abroad it is to learn Bangla. For a child of Muslim faith I think Arabic might be more useful.

IMO I think learning heritage for a child is extremely much more important. But I think sitting down with a child and telling them about Bangladesh helps alot as well.

That being said, Mina was a decent cartoon with much moral values.




Perhaps. But I was asking for clarification :D

Speaking only from personal experience, I am extremely grateful to my parents for teaching me Bangla. I remember hating reading Amar boi. Those stories never interested me and I always asked myself why I was reading these. But really, it helped me develop a great foundation for my Bangla and helped me be able to read other Bengali literature. I don't know if and when I become a parent whether I will have the same patience my parents did to teach my children Bangla, but I believe it's very important. I love travelling to Bangladesh and what makes things easier for me is being able to read the signs in Bengali or just waking up in the morning and seeing the newspaper and flicking through it and actually being able to read what it says. It made me develop a sense of belonging to a country I've never lived in. Bangla is also spoken by over 215 million people around the world. This number will only increase and so in the long run, it might become one of those languages like French or Spanish that we will need for work relate/diplomatic purposes. :)

Also, going to present a very controversial (?) and unpopular opinion here, but I dislike the concept of Arabic being learned for the purpose of religion. Unless of course the person wants to do that themselves. I've always had this internal battle as to why everything in Islam has to be Arabic. I mean, I understand why but for me I always believed that religion is personal and you can pray/speak to God in any language and it will be valued the same as if you were to do it in Arabic. Again, just a personal opinion. I know it's controversial but that's what I've always felt and although I know the reasoning behind the emphasis of Arabic, that's not how all people may want to connect to their creator.

adamnsu
July 6, 2018, 03:43 AM
Adam bhai, ami kintu serious silam. Bangla shikhkhar beparey ami gafiloti pochondo kori na.
Amar jonmo ekhaney kintu amar baap-ma Adorsholipi ar Bangla medium er class 1 - 6 er shob boi ekhaney niye ashsilo. Tarpor prottek summer vacationey, ami oi boigua portam ar copy korey lekhalekhi o korechi.
Tarpor ek bosor deshey silam GCSE deoar por. Tokhon band shongeet, natok, cinema, tin goenda , Feluda - eishober shathey aro familair holam.

Thanks for the clarification my savoury bhai :D

I think for kids who are not going to Bangladesh to live it is not essential to learn Bangla IMO despite the sentiment of it. Although I would stress on the teaching the culture of Bangladesh. Majority of Bangladeshis in the UK take Bangla as a second language. Also when I talk to the expats (Non Sylheti) most of them teach the spoken aspect of it.

In the car I always play some Bangla songs from Fuad for example. I will also start watching with him the funny village dramas too.

adamnsu
July 6, 2018, 04:22 AM
Speaking only from personal experience, I am extremely grateful to my parents for teaching me Bangla. I remember hating reading Amar boi. Those stories never interested me and I always asked myself why I was reading these. But really, it helped me develop a great foundation for my Bangla and helped me be able to read other Bengali literature. I don't know if and when I become a parent whether I will have the same patience my parents did to teach my children Bangla, but I believe it's very important. I love travelling to Bangladesh and what makes things easier for me is being able to read the signs in Bengali or just waking up in the morning and seeing the newspaper and flicking through it and actually being able to read what it says. It made me develop a sense of belonging to a country I've never lived in. Bangla is also spoken by over 215 million people around the world. This number will only increase and so in the long run, it might become one of those languages like French or Spanish that we will need for work relate/diplomatic purposes. :)

Also, going to present a very controversial (?) and unpopular opinion here, but I dislike the concept of Arabic being learned for the purpose of religion. Unless of course the person wants to do that themselves. I've always had this internal battle as to why everything in Islam has to be Arabic. I mean, I understand why but for me I always believed that religion is personal and you can pray/speak to God in any language and it will be valued the same as if you were to do it in Arabic. Again, just a personal opinion. I know it's controversial but that's what I've always felt and although I know the reasoning behind the emphasis of Arabic, that's not how all people may want to connect to their creator.

Thank you for sharing your views.

I had fond memories of Amar Boi as it was easy to ready. Some good stories about Jaynal Abedin and Matiru Rahman that I can remember from such a long long time ago. However I had to learn Bangla when I was abroad as I was going to stay in Bangladesh for my schooling, and didnt like it much as I was being deprived of my free time. But it did help me get an extra A in my O levels.

On another note, I see English medium kids in Bangladesh being quite poor in reading and writing Bangla as because the GSCE requirements have always been quite basic IMO. No one I knew read literature books even Humayan Ahmed even after learning Bangla for more years than I did. Damn I could read a paper more fluently than my friends from the likes of Scholastica, BIT and Willes Little Fleur.

Apart from the sentimental value, learning Bangla might not be too practical for most kids growing abroad unless they are planning to come back to live in Bangladesh for a long period. Kids in UK these are learning Mandarin as it has over 1 billion speakers and is a major trading partner. This might end up as a hobby for many to teach their kids Bangla. But speaking and understanding Bangla is what is followed in almost all households. We always stress in speaking Bangla at home and also my inlaws.

For Muslims there are guidelines for connecting with the Creator, and one is through prayer which is in Arabic. As these are the rules in Islam one has to abide by it there is no two ways about it. Although a few things I have learnt from priests is that the intentions of prayer can be done in any language and not Arabic. But if one goes out of this norm of praying in Arabic, I feel one is in danger of creating a different religion but Allah knows best. Its like learning a subject in English, but during the exams writing answers (despite being correct) in Bangla :D, but then again it is all upto the examiner of how much marks they will give.

Like you mentioned earlier with the joy of reading Bangla, a Muslim child will be able to read Arabic, the words they use while praying. This is one of the reasons we have put my son for reading Arabic.

Shingara
July 6, 2018, 04:34 AM
Adam bhai, this has been going on for decades where kids grow up abroad and their parents encourage them to speak English at home and never gave any preference to Bengali.
In the end, after the kids grow up to be teenagers, oi parentgulai afsos korey .. Ish, amar cheley jodi Bangla parto. But, by then it's too late. If kids aren't forced to learn at a young age, boro houar por ar kisu hoy na.

My best friend is a British Syleti. He was born in BD but came here when he was 5. He can't speak/read or write Bengali but he has a slight interest and tries to use Bengali words in his conversations with me. He also likes Bangladesh and finds even a rickshaw fascinating. His wife is also Syleti but was born here. She has no interest in Bengali or Bangladesh. None of them can teach their son Bengali as they don't know it themselves!

I went to a Pohela boishakh cultural event few months ago and the little kids running around were conversing in English amongst themselves and the parents were also instructing them in English like 'Kashfia, ma, come eat rice' lol

Shingara
July 6, 2018, 04:41 AM
Maybe watch some old BTV dubed series with the kids like Sinbad ?
https://youtu.be/P6w-h06L2Ds

There were many more like Gul Sanobar, Hatem tai, Sword of Tipu Sultan etc.

adamnsu
July 6, 2018, 07:24 AM
Adam bhai, this has been going on for decades where kids grow up abroad and their parents encourage them to speak English at home and never gave any preference to Bengali.
In the end, after the kids grow up to be teenagers, oi parentgulai afsos korey .. Ish, amar cheley jodi Bangla parto. But, by then it's too late. If kids aren't forced to learn at a young age, boro houar por ar kisu hoy na.

My best friend is a British Syleti. He was born in BD but came here when he was 5. He can't speak/read or write Bengali but he has a slight interest and tries to use Bengali words in his conversations with me. He also likes Bangladesh and finds even a rickshaw fascinating. His wife is also Syleti but was born here. She has no interest in Bengali or Bangladesh. None of them can teach their son Bengali as they don't know it themselves!

I went to a Pohela boishakh cultural event few months ago and the little kids running around were conversing in English amongst themselves and the parents were also instructing them in English like 'Kashfia, ma, come eat rice' lol

I dont think the British Sylhetis I know not regret learning Bangla. Most of them can speak Sylheti only and I feel they are happy with that. The younger people dont want to go to Bangladesh regularly as its expensive and its not a holiday for many due to the hassle.

But yes most people in their 30s or 40s among the British Sylhetis (born in UK) tend to speak with their kids in English. Bottom line is Bangla and Sylheti is only used when speaking to people who normally dont speak English so the use of this is quite limited as well.

mufi_02
July 6, 2018, 09:34 AM
Forget Arabic or Bangla. I’m teaching my kids Sylethi.

Shingara
July 7, 2018, 06:14 AM
I dont think the British Sylhetis I know not regret learning Bangla. Most of them can speak Sylheti only and I feel they are happy with that. The younger people dont want to go to Bangladesh regularly as its expensive and its not a holiday for many due to the hassle.

But yes most people in their 30s or 40s among the British Sylhetis (born in UK) tend to speak with their kids in English. Bottom line is Bangla and Sylheti is only used when speaking to people who normally dont speak English so the use of this is quite limited as well.

My wife said this about the British Syleti youngsters : Farmer murgi money korey farm hochchey prithibir shobcheye bhalo jayga. Farmer bairey life nai.

We digress.

Btw, about Scholastica kids.. apparently the school has strict rules that you can't speak Bengali onsite. If you do, a complaint is made and your parents have to pay a visit. That's why they speak like foreign Bangladeshi kids.

adamnsu
July 7, 2018, 07:28 AM
My wife said this about the British Syleti youngsters : Farmer murgi money korey farm hochchey prithibir shobcheye bhalo jayga. Farmer bairey life nai.

We digress.

Btw, about Scholastica kids.. apparently the school has strict rules that you can't speak Bengali onsite. If you do, a complaint is made and your parents have to pay a visit. That's why they speak like foreign Bangladeshi kids.

Top marks to Bhabi for that analogy . But what I don’t get is why they think free range murgi are not good.

Well when I was in school we couldn’t speak in Bangla by default as there were kids of so many nationalities. Even the care taker spoke in English and could also manage a conversation in French.

But our Principal always stressed on being Bangladeshi. Although I never heard her speak in Bangla as she always spoke with a posh British accent.

icricket
July 8, 2018, 01:15 AM
Good thread. In my opinion, a child is at more advantage if the child is exposed to more than one language while young. Since I am a Bangladeshi muslim, when I become a parent I would like to teach my children Bangla, and Arabic. If the child learns Spanish/French and mandarin in school, that pretty much covers many lands. One of my good friends once told me that you should through all the knowledge at youngsters, and they will catch whatever they can to summarize the importance of languages (including coding.)

Shingara
July 8, 2018, 05:46 AM
Top marks to Bhabi for that analogy . But what I don’t get is why they think free range murgi are not good.



Ego or perhaps false sense of superiority.

adamnsu
July 8, 2018, 12:41 PM
Ego or perhaps false sense of superiority.

I don’t want to start a war, but I think Sylethi’s are quite tribal. That is why anyone outside the division is treated as an outsider which I have seen in the UK. It’s almost like a caste system when Sylethis get married.

That is why I think it is important to teach kids that we are all under one same brand despite us being from different regions.

adamnsu
July 8, 2018, 12:44 PM
Good thread. In my opinion, a child is at more advantage if the child is exposed to more than one language while young. Since I am a Bangladeshi muslim, when I become a parent I would like to teach my children Bangla, and Arabic. If the child learns Spanish/French and mandarin in school, that pretty much covers many lands. One of my good friends once told me that you should through all the knowledge at youngsters, and they will catch whatever they can to summarize the importance of languages (including coding.)

We heard of a white family who’s toddler started speaking in Bangla because of their Nanny.

But yes kids are like sponge when learning new stuff. So I also think the younger they learn languages the easier it is for them.

R0ssei
July 10, 2018, 01:52 PM
Alhamdulillah, I'm blessed with 3 girls/women in my family - my mom, wife and our 3 year old daughter. Yes, teaching her Bangla is a concern/struggle for me. We, especially her Dadi, don't converse in English with her at all, yet she picks the English words rather easily, mainly due to her growing addiction to Kids Youtube (another concern).

I'm a lazy person by nature. But I try to take her outdoor (driveway, backyard, nearby park etc.) during spring/summer here in Canada. I always try to buy developmental toys for her. I've made a small 3-wheeler robot for her that she loves now. I always try to test her math/logic skills. Born in a Bangladeshi-Muslim family and growing up in Canada, she would probably learn English, Bangla, Arabic, French and Hindi (as her mom is a fluent speaker).

adamnsu
July 11, 2018, 03:36 AM
Alhamdulillah, I'm blessed with 3 girls/women in my family - my mom, wife and our 3 year old daughter. Yes, teaching her Bangla is a concern/struggle for me. We, especially her Dadi, don't converse in English with her at all, yet she picks the English words rather easily, mainly due to her growing addiction to Kids Youtube (another concern).

I'm a lazy person by nature. But I try to take her outdoor (driveway, backyard, nearby park etc.) during spring/summer here in Canada. I always try to buy developmental toys for her. I've made a small 3-wheeler robot for her that she loves now. I always try to test her math/logic skills. Born in a Bangladeshi-Muslim family and growing up in Canada, she would probably learn English, Bangla, Arabic, French and Hindi (as her mom is a fluent speaker).

Yes kids tend to pick up English more easily due to the influence of media around them these days. We also try to speak in Bangla at home with my son and he does understand everything but doesnt always reply back but hopefully as he gets older he will use Bangla more InshahAllah.

We once were invited to this friends house with a theme of dressing up in traditional Bangladeshi clothing, as they were getting worried their daughter was becoming too white and rejecting traditional clothes.

I usually play football and cricket with my son when I get the chance after I come back from work. I think these memories are something the child will cherish forever. We always try to look for something for him to do even during summer holidays as his other extra circular activities remain closed(as we dont travel abroad then). I think we might restart his tennis lesson, as I saw that tennis schools for children under 7 years old is normally a waste of time where I live.

Some of my friends kids also go to Drama clubs during summer, as this apparently helps build confidence especially speaking to an audience.

My cousins had to learn French when they moved to Canada many years ago, and the government were giving money to parents to make their children learn the language. I am not sure if this is a common practise these days.

adamnsu
July 29, 2018, 12:40 PM
Was thinking of what you guys thinking of when and how much time should a child spend on a tablet/iPad?