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Rubu
May 30, 2004, 11:33 PM
See rafique's short interview after finishing the century in prothom-alo Here (http://www.prothom-alo.net/newhtmlnews1/category.php?CategoryID=9&Date=2004-05-31). It feels so touchy reading rafique's dhakaiya accents. I never heard expressions like "century maarsee".

btw, did anyone already posted this?

Nasif
May 30, 2004, 11:52 PM
Originally posted by AgentSmith
I never heard expressions like "century maarsee".


Wow agent! Tumi ki shobshomoy 100 bhag khati shuddho bangla bolo? :D

I would say, "marsee, pitaisee, gesi, khaisi, khelmu, jamu, gesos, koros, korsi etc.." are quite common accent, and not limited dhaka.

<img src=http://games.banglacricket.com/images/cricketers/rafique_bangla_quote.gif>

Rafique rules:cool:

rassel
May 31, 2004, 12:02 AM
My house is approximately 3 mile from rafiqs’ house; which is located in Keraniganj! I couldn’t even remember how many time that I have used this expression! Akso maybe hazar varer moto! It’s not an uncommon expression agent!;)

[Edited on 31-5-2004 by rassel]

Rubu
May 31, 2004, 12:03 AM
to be honest, i NEVER speak 100% khati bangla. my bangla has a strong north bengal accent. but what i'm saying is, never heard the use of of "century" and "maarsee" togather.

century korsi.
century pitaisi.

are common, never heard of century maarsee. but i really liked this interview. its unique. they way he was saying, is the opposite of "diplomatic comment". so honest and straight cut. if he were our captain, and he were to speak in front of media, he would make the team famous in few days. i mean if he can really transilate the meaning in english. he is not very literate, as we all know. i wonder what mba says about it. his literacy did not prevent him from achieving all these great things one after another.

Nasif
May 31, 2004, 12:08 AM
I thought you were talking about his accent :)

Yes, his interview was great. I think it was less of interview, more of casual talk with Utpol Shuvro. In any event, it was great to read.

Did you guys watch Bashar's post match interview of 3rd ODI. He impressed me with his english :) (khaled masud was a nightmare)

rassel
May 31, 2004, 12:10 AM
century pitaisi.:lol:
this is khati bangla! like this expression!

by the way mba went to hibernation.( i keed Mba) :lol:

EngWIndian
May 31, 2004, 05:49 AM
Originally posted by nasif
Originally posted by AgentSmith
I never heard expressions like "century maarsee".


Wow agent! Tumi ki shobshomoy 100 bhag khati shuddho bangla bolo? :D

I would say, "marsee, pitaisee, gesi, khaisi, khelmu, jamu, gesos, koros, korsi etc.." are quite common accent, and not limited dhaka.

<img src=http://games.banglacricket.com/images/cricketers/rafique_bangla_quote.gif>

Rafique rules:cool:

Translate Please !:)

BDFan
May 31, 2004, 07:27 AM
translation - "bowling is more important to me, but getting wickets is a matter of luck. ill do my bowling, let them hit sixes if they can."

reverse_swing
May 31, 2004, 07:30 AM
where did u get sixes?

BDFan
May 31, 2004, 07:38 AM
Originally posted by reverse_swing
where did u get sixes?

if i did the literal translation word for word, it would sound funny in english, so i had to do a translation of the theme of what he said.

rafiq
May 31, 2004, 09:42 AM
Source: New Age (http://www.newagebd.com/spt.html)
Right Rafique at the right moment
ZAYD ALMER KHAN

When Mohammad Rafique was offered bad light by Daryl Harper and Jeremy Lloyds a few minutes before 6:00pm local time at St Lucia Saturday, the “you-must-be-kidding-me” look he flashed in reply said it all.
Tony Cozier, in between fond reminiscence of Manjrekar Sr’s ground fielding during the 1953 tour, interpreted the expression fairly well. But an even more succinct description would have come if Sir Geoffrey was in the commentary box. Boycott had once described a similar situation thus: “Six wild horses couldn’t drag him off the field right now.”
Indeed, neither wild horses nor the temperamental Caribbean weather could take Rafique’s century away from him. Such was his righteous claim on this day that could only belong to him, and nobody else.
It was a majestic innings, at least as majestic as a number nine batsman will ever play. And every one of the 138 deliveries faced, with such poise and confidence, were worth the sleepless night that went on till four in the morning here in Bangladesh.
Rafique was a man possessed. Even the twitchy, uncertain defensive stabs he customarily offers at bouncers aimed at his body came off with well-orchestrated precision.
He lived by the sword, some would say. But he didn’t, really. The boundaries that flew over the slip cordon were more deliberate than accidental edges, as confirmed by the expert commentators.
But what really impressed on Saturday was that between flashes of his trademark free-flow of the willow there was a more studied, compact batsman at the crease — a Rafique rarely seen before. The century was pre-ordained, it seemed, and Rafique seemed to have known it all along.
So when the lights almost threatened to go out, and the rains actually did come pouring down, Rafique still wouldn’t budge. The only sign of desperation during an innings of such sublime maturity was when he felt the umpires might go off with him stranded on 99.
Otherwise, throughout the innings but especially later on as he approached the landmark, Rafique was as collected as you would expect a Rahul Dravid to be.
At a time when the tension of not being able to wrap up the Bangladesh innings was threatening to get at the West Indians, especially Ramnaresh Sarwan, it was Rafique who kept it light on the field, jokingly encouraging Sarwan’s unnecessary throws at the stumps every time he fielded off his own bowling.
The most telling sign of his self-belief was when Rafique trusted his partners Taposh Baisya and Tarek Aziz
Khan — numbers ten and eleven in the line-up respectably — to support him at the other end.
On Saturday, such was Rafique’s temperament — a truly Test-match temperament. Amid all the doomsday predictions and cynicism about our cricket, it is a temperament that Bangladesh will find, one Rafique at a time.

Rubu
May 31, 2004, 11:08 AM
Originally posted by EngWIndian
Originally posted by nasif
Originally posted by AgentSmith
I never heard expressions like "century maarsee".


Wow agent! Tumi ki shobshomoy 100 bhag khati shuddho bangla bolo? :D

I would say, "marsee, pitaisee, gesi, khaisi, khelmu, jamu, gesos, koros, korsi etc.." are quite common accent, and not limited dhaka.

<img src=http://games.banglacricket.com/images/cricketers/rafique_bangla_quote.gif>

Rafique rules:cool:

Translate Please !:)

when u read the transilation, u see nothing. because u can't transilate the "gesture" in the words. but, thats the only way to transilate it.

sage
May 31, 2004, 10:46 PM
Rafiq is very comfortable with his luck. Actually other player should do the same too. Their luck cannot be worse then their skill. God is not that cruel.