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TigerFan
June 24, 2004, 11:08 AM
I didn't see the third of the LOrd of the rings. And the Prisoner of the Azkaban also. Anybody seen? If yes, how was it? I know they must be very good. Can you believe J. k. Rowling? She is so talented. I mean reading her books fulfilled the hunger of my imaginary world. I wish I was young again!:(

200SX
June 24, 2004, 12:02 PM
well i saw the third one..... i kno its a movie for the kid, evan i was embrassed first time whn i was buyin movie ticket of it... its like thousands of kids around me.......

neway.... movie was ok..... more use of graphics than other two parts. but story wasnt good than other two parts........

those kids(harry, hamaine) have grown up......n emma watson (hamaine) looks more preety..... i reackon very soon she gona b a sexy girl......honestly i went to movie to c her only......:P

TigerFan
June 24, 2004, 12:27 PM
what can I say, boys will be boys!

James90
June 24, 2004, 05:34 PM

FaltuRidwanBhai
June 24, 2004, 08:45 PM
dhuru,
polapaine ki koi ar na koi. shob foul. akta hagole naki abar zharur upor choira ghura ghuri kore. haidar nam naki harrish pagol.

TigerFan
June 26, 2004, 12:51 AM
Here I got some movie clips of Ha
rry Potter and Priso... movie:

Movie clips (http://movies.yahoo.com/movies/feature/harrypotter.html) (Link)

[Edited on 26-6-2004 by TigerFan]

TigerFan
June 26, 2004, 01:01 AM
I also should apologize for posting for Harry Potter and Prisoner of Azkaban. Because you see, this movie is all about magic which is haram in islam. Here's the link for it:



islam-online.net (http://www.islam-online.net/fatwaapplication/english/display.asp?hFatwaID=115644)

[Edited on 26-6-2004 by TigerFan]

billah
June 26, 2004, 02:23 AM
I saw Ring 3 well before it was released in theaters in the USA. All of South Asia was flooded with crisp, clear frist class copies of it. Enjoyed it thoroughly.:P

Navarene
June 26, 2004, 03:21 AM
Originally posted by TigerFan
I also should apologize for posting for Harry Potter and Prisoner of Azkaban. Because you see, this movie is all about magic which is haram in islam.

You shouldn't be sorry and apologize for posting the thread, since fantasy and mythology of human mind have nothing to do with so called haram-halal dilemma.

Ever since the advent of science in the seventeenth century, we have rejected mythology as a product of superstitious and primitive mind. Only now are we coming to a fuller appreciation of the nature and role of myth and fantasy in human history. Social anthropology discovers their significance for human understanding. In fact, to label everything with so called haram-halal "fatowa" to discover human understanding is a CRIME.

FaltuRidwanBhai
June 26, 2004, 07:30 AM
ki jani bhai,
aishob bepar amar kase khub jotil mone hoi. karon akdom shukkho gan na thakle amar mone hoi na aishob bishoye comment kora uchit. chomotbelay to amar hujur bolto tv hochhe shoitaner baksho. kintu tv te to bhalo jinisho hoi. jemon dhoren khobor. adhunik bishho shommondhe jana jai ai shob ar ki. tahole ete haram ar ki ase. jodio hote pare. ami thik jani na. dannabad.

TigerFan
June 26, 2004, 08:19 AM
Ridwan bhai,

magic is haram by quran. I know for sure. and the link i have posted from the link www.islam-online.com has information that is provided by very respectable, educated, knowledgeble, experienced islamic scholars. they know far more than Navarene:), you and me. ok! they have far more depth and their knowledge is uncomperable to ours. these scholars are internationaly known.

FaltuRidwanBhai
June 26, 2004, 08:55 AM
ji tiger fan bhai,
apnake kintu oshongkho dannabad oi guruttopurno website ar jonno ebong apnar information ar jonno. ji asholai kintu bishoyti besh guruttopurno bole ami mone kori. dannabad.

TigerFan
June 29, 2004, 09:37 AM
I just watched the Return of the king yesterday. I enjoyed it. But I didn't understand two things.
1. Why at the end Frodo Baggins and hiis uncle left with elfts and Gandalf?

2. Why Frodo left the book with sam and why he said that few more pages are left for sam to fill up?

:)

Nasif
June 29, 2004, 10:09 PM
Originally posted by TigerFan
I also should apologize for posting for Harry Potter and Prisoner of Azkaban. Because you see, this movie is all about magic which is haram in islam. Here's the link for it:

islam-online.net (http://www.islam-online.net/fatwaapplication/english/display.asp?hFatwaID=115644)

[Edited on 26-6-2004 by TigerFan]

It would be wise not search for fatwa's by human but rather search for the laws of God in Quran.

Sorcery/witchcraft/Magic:
<i>Quran 2:102</i>
They pursued what the devils taught concerning Solomon's kingdom. Solomon, however, was not a disbeliever, but the devils were disbelievers. They taught the people sorcery, and that which was sent down through the two angels of Babel, Haroot and Maroot. These two did not divulge such knowledge without pointing out: 'This is a test. You shall not abuse such knowledge.' But the people used it in such evil schemes as the breaking up of marriages. They can never harm anyone against the will of GOD. They thus learn what hurts them, not what benefits them, and they know full well that whoever practices witchcraft will have no share in the Hereafter. Miserable indeed is what they sell their souls for, if they only knew.

Do not mix up reality with movie magic. Movies/stories/novels/poems/paintings/dramas/or any art form are human imagination either based on some truth or complete fantasy.

Quranic rule forbids anything that can be used to harm people. That has nothing to do fantasy world created in human mind.

Unless the magic in Lord of The Ring or Harry Potter is breaking real life marriages and creating havoc on society; I do not see how such a thing can be prohibited based on Quran.

<b>Moreover I personally believe there is no human at this point in time who can do any form form real magic or sorcery or supernatural thing.</b> That knowledge doesn't exist anymore. Notice that Quran says the knowledge was given to some humans by the angels. Humans didnot/cannot invent such a knowledge that is supernatural.

All those "babas/pirs/fokirs/pandits" who can do miracles are just lying and fooling the common mass.

Lastly, it is better for us to stay away from fatwa givers. All that is needed is Quran. Do your search and study and you will have your answers.

Quran Search engine:
http://yaqb.lrhazi.com/

[Edited on 30-6-2004 by nasif]

Nasif
June 29, 2004, 10:18 PM
Originally posted by TigerFan
I just watched the Return of the king yesterday. I enjoyed it. But I didn't understand two things.
1. Why at the end Frodo Baggins and hiis uncle left with elfts and Gandalf?

2. Why Frodo left the book with sam and why he said that few more pages are left for sam to fill up?

:)

1. Frodo left with others (uncle/gandalf...) because all of them died at some point before! They are supposed to be dead but came back to life to finish what is to be done. After everything was done, they departed for the other world.

2. To finish the story that his uncle started. Frodo wants Sam to finish it with the events that was unfolding right then.

TigerFan
June 30, 2004, 12:34 PM
[quote]Frodo left with others (uncle/gandalf...) because all of them died at some point before! They are supposed to be dead but came back to life to finish what is to be done. After everything was done, they departed for the other world. [\quote]

When they died? Frodo, Uncle, Gandalf?

Nasif
June 30, 2004, 12:56 PM
Originally posted by TigerFan
When they died? Frodo, Uncle, Gandalf?

Frodo died in the first movie (Fellowship). He was killed during the fight in the cave. He came back to life with the help of that "Mithreal" jacket (it was a shiny jacket which was gifted by his uncle as they were starting their mission).

Uncle died because the ring kept him alive for all these year. Naturally he would have died long ago. The ring was keeping him alive for all these years.

Gandalf died in the final fight in the cave in the first movie when he fell down to the bottom with that fire monster.

[Edited on 30-6-2004 by nasif]

Zunaid
June 30, 2004, 01:32 PM
The movie took some minor liberties - especially at the very end where they accelerated the departure of Bilbo and Frodo to the "Undying Lands" of the elves.

But, I don't think the movie took enough liberties to imply that Frodo/Bilbo/Gandalf actually died.

After the quest, Frodo returns to the Shire and has some more adventures and even ends up being Deputy Mayor of the Shire.

Here is a summary of his departure:

While his three companions were able to return to their former lives and were hailed as heroes, Frodo could not find peace in the Shire or acceptance by his fellow Hobbits. Physically, he had changed. He was no longer the stout, red-cheeked Hobbit who had set out from the Shire the year before. Both Gandalf and Sam had perceived a clear light shining faintly within Frodo, and to Sam Frodo's face had become "old and beautiful, as if the chiselling of the shaping years was now revealed in many fine lines that had before been hidden, though the identity of the face was not changed." (TTT, p. 260)

Frodo became ill on the anniversaries of his encounters with the Witch-king and Shelob. He was, as he put it, "wounded with knife, sting, and tooth, and a long burden." (RotK, p. 268) A worse burden was the guilt Frodo felt for not being able to destroy the Ring and the desire he still felt for the Ring. "It is gone for ever, and now all is dark and empty," he said during one of his periods of illness. (RotK, p. 304)

At last, Frodo decided that the only way he could find healing was to leave Middle-earth forever.

"But," said Sam, and tears started in his eyes, "I thought you were going to enjoy the Shire, too. for years and years, after all you have done."
"So I thought too, once. But I have been too deeply hurt, Sam. I tried to save the Shire, and it has been saved, but not for me. It must often be so, Sam, when things are in danger: some one has to give them up, lose them, so that others may keep them."
The Return of the King: "The Grey Havens," p. 209

On September 29, 3021, Frodo came to the Grey Havens accompanied by Sam. Merry and Pippin were there to meet them. Frodo said goodbye to his three friends and boarded a ship with Bilbo and the bearers of the Three Elven-rings: Gandalf, Galadriel and Elrond. The ship set sail to the Undying Lands.

The Undying Lands were across the Sea to the west of Middle-earth. The spirits called the Valar dwelled there as did many Elves. Mortals were not normally allowed to go to the Undying Lands, but because of the great burden they had borne, Frodo and Bilbo were given special permission. It is thought that Gandalf, as an emissary of the Valar, may have granted this favor at the request of Arwen.

Although Frodo's ultimate fate is not recorded, it is believed that he lived out the rest of his days on Tol Eressea - an island off the coast of the main continent of Aman where Valinor was located. There Frodo may have finally found the peace and healing he sought.

Frodo was mortal and he remained so. He eventually died, though the year of his death is not recorded. Sam Gamgee, the last of the Ring-bearers, was allowed to sail to the Undying Lands in the year 61 of the Fourth Age, and it is hoped that these two great friends were reunited one last time before they died.

Here is the summary of Bilbo's departure:

After Frodo returned from his quest, Bilbo had become sleepy and forgetful and yet a desire for the Ring remained even then.

"... what's become of my ring, Frodo, that you took away?"
"I have lost it, Bilbo dear," said Frodo. "I got rid of it, you know."
"What a pity!" said Bilbo. "I should have liked to see it again. But no, how silly of me! That's what you went for, wasn't it: to get rid of it?"
The Return of the King: "Many Partings," p. 265


Because Bilbo had also been a Ring-bearer, he was allowed to pass into the West to keep Frodo company. Bilbo set out from Rivendell and with Gandalf, Elrond and Galadriel he met Frodo in the Woody End on September 22, 3021. That day he turned 131 and passed the Old Took as the longest-lived Hobbit. They rode to the Grey Havens and on September 29 they boarded the ship that would take them away from Middle-earth. It is believed that Bilbo lived the remainder of his days with Frodo on Tol Eressea.

Incidentally, the above and much more can be found on http://www.tuckborough.net/

I do reccommend that everyone read the trilogy.

rassel
June 30, 2004, 01:40 PM
I gat a question which group does Gandalf belongs to?

Zunaid
June 30, 2004, 01:49 PM
In Tolkien mythology, the Valars were gods and often sent emmissaries to "Middle Earth" - Gandalf is a Maiar - one of the spirits who serve the Valars. The Maiar who were sent by the Valar to Middle-earth were given the bodies of old men and were known as Istari, or Wizards. Their mission was to help the free peoples of Middle-earth oppose Sauron without seeking domination or power for themselves. So Gandalf is NOT a native denizen of Middle Earth.

rassel
June 30, 2004, 01:58 PM
Ok thanks Dr. Z, all along I though he was elfts !