View Single Post
  #13  
Old February 19, 2012, 04:46 PM
bujhee kom's Avatar
bujhee kom bujhee kom is offline
Cricket Savant
 
Join Date: June 27, 2007
Location: Dhaka Mental Hospital
Favorite Player: Jahanara Alam, Zuccarello
Posts: 25,000

Papertiger bhai, this is a very good thread, I will tell you a story...when I came to the U.S. at the age of 18 as an art college student about 22-23 years ago, I was very hungry and very very poor. I worked at a Burger King on Abercorn Street in Savannah, Georgia. I worked there for about 3 weeks and eventually I moved on to a ma and pa pizza place on Tybee Island (Savannah vicinity)on the southeastern coast of Georgia, about 250 miles south of Atlanta.

At the Burger King, I remember I was the only foreign kid, along with two white girls and about 12 black kids (boys and girls) ....I soon realized where I belong, and who I am financially...the whites, blacks and I, we were all poor. I took the bus to work everyday as they did or their mom would drop them off....they were mostly high school students and I was attending college...at that time, m,y early days in the U.S. I had limitation with my understanding of English language (let it be, coloqual (spell) tongue, deep southern accent, ethnic accent etc.) .....the manager often couldn't give me the cash register as I often failed to take the right order or underestand what the people really wanted. So it was my job to clean the men's toilet while one of the girls cleaned the women's. I wasn't sad to to say, but I didn't my parents to know this as this probably would have made them feel some kind of pain....as I said, I eventually worked making Pizza for an Old, very fat and very kind/sweet/motherly Italian lady on the island and eventually I worked for her brother who was a shrimper/clam/mussles farmer...I cleaned fishes' inerds (spell) for him and I didn't really eat the fish unless just shell-fish. I enjoyed doing it a lot more than those Burger King weeks.

Like many of our elder/older brothers and sisters here in BC said, I stayed focus on a mission to get through each year of my 6 years long painful architecture education...I put my nose on the grind stone and I said to myself, even if I never become an architect, I must at least earn my bachelor's dgree in architecture....and I somehow survived through.

Years/decade later when I moved to New Orleans, Louisiana to go to graduate architecture school, I eventually met my then future-wife from Nashville, Tennessee who was then a master's student in Antrhopology/Public History - social science. We fell in love and I learned about her life, her parents' lives, theri early lives in the 70's and 80's. My wife's parents struggled to raise their two children (my wife and her 1.5 yrs younger brother) with their limited education and very limited means, earnings...my father in-law had a very small business and mother in-law just had a high school (12 grade grad...equivilant to an Intermediate/HSC of our country) diploma and she worked very very hard in factories, 14 hours a day in Humid/hot no fan(froget A/C) Tennessee weather and and then she went home took shower and went to take care of this obnoxious (spell) neighbour's kid for a few extra dollars so that they (my in-laws) can put their daughter (my wife) through classical music lesson and buy her instruments which were unbelievably expansive (Oboe and Clarinet//Brass and Wood instruments) during her high school years ...eventually my wife got her a Phd and she is a faculty in anthropolgy in NYC today but she/I remember what her and my parents did for us.

To bring some happy ending to all this, I also should tell you my Nashville parents eventyually came to Dhaka to meet my parents and I took them to my ancestorial grounds of Kharampur/Brahmanbaria/Comilla and Moynamoti...and they showed their respect for my ancestors as I/my parents did theirs/ours for my momma/dad (in -laws ) root/birthplace/larger familys in the rural deep south. My mother-in law eventually rode a rickshaw with my father in-law and my abba as her passengers while the half of our village clapped, laughed and applause!

Life is a struggle and you do your struggle bros and sis, and always always keep your mind focused on the job, the task on hand! Inshallah you will succeed. Hang in there bro!!

P.S. My wife gave me permission to write these things here about her family.
__________________
God bless Ingrid Newkirk, Dianne Feinstein, Hillary Clinton, Kamala Harris, Kirsten Gillibrand & Mitch Landrieu!
twitter.com/bujheekom
Reply With Quote