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  #1  
Old September 30, 2007, 11:59 AM
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Default What Muslim school do you follow?

There are four schools of law in Islam in the Sunni sector, these include Hanafi, Shafi'i, Malaki and Hanabi, but all of these confuse me between thier laws and regualtions, and I cannot decide which on is really the right one, plus there is a new type of school that has been formed, called the Salafi movement, they say they follow the rules from the beggining of time.

Last edited by Moshin; December 21, 2007 at 01:51 PM..
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  #2  
Old September 30, 2007, 12:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moshin_31
Ramadan poll: There are four schools of law in Islam in the Sunni sector, these include Hanafi, Shafi'i, Malaki and Hanabi, but all of these confuse me between thier laws and regualtions, and I cannot decide which on is really the right one, plus there is a new type of school that has been formed, called the Salafi movement, they say they follow the rules from the beggining of time.
they are all correct. in fact, each of the four recognize the veracity of the other 3. its a matter of what you are born into and what your personal beliefs are...i myself find that i end up blending ideas from the four mathabs/imams although i am technically, like most subcontinent muslims, a hanafi.

more important than what mathab we follow, is figuring out if the islam you have is the same islam that the quran expounds.
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  #3  
Old September 30, 2007, 04:23 PM
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I dont follow a sect I simply am muslim and go by one book, Al Quran
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  #4  
Old September 30, 2007, 04:33 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr_Naf
I dont follow a sect I simply am muslim and go by one book, Al Quran
Echo those feelings and thoughts.
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  #5  
Old September 30, 2007, 06:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sohel NR
Echo those feelings and thoughts.
as do i...
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  #6  
Old September 30, 2007, 07:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr_Naf
I dont follow a sect I simply am muslim and go by one book, Al Quran
Same here.

I never heard some of those "schools" until quite recently.
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  #7  
Old October 1, 2007, 05:58 AM
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Actually, Islam is very broad, and genral public like us cannot follow it properly without following a school. There four schools, and each of them them is right in their own way. All other schools or -ism that exists are void, and that's why to follow Islam properly, we must choose one of the four schools of Ahlus Sunnah wal Jamaayat.

Last edited by BD-Shardul; October 1, 2007 at 07:40 AM..
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  #8  
Old October 1, 2007, 09:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BD-Shardul
Actually, Islam is very broad, and genral public like us cannot follow it properly without following a school. There four schools, and each of them them is right in their own way. All other schools or -ism that exists are void, and that's why to follow Islam properly, we must choose one of the four schools of Ahlus Sunnah wal Jamaayat.
Who said that? Any reference which connects to the Quran or the Prophet (Peace be upon him)?

How hard it is for the general public to believe in Allah and his messengers, his books, his angles, and the hereafter, give charity, be humble, perform hajj if one has the ability, say his/her prayers and fast, and not commit major sins? If this was that hard then Allah wouldn't prescribe us this religion. Madhab is created by Human. There are many things about future which is mentioned in the Holy Quran but that do not include madhab. If Madhab was that important then certainly the All-Knowing would have had mentioned it.

The words "cannot" and "must" is disturbing. You may want to rephrase the post. Relaying what one knows is very good. But trying to make it as the only way of life is not a good idea.
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  #9  
Old October 1, 2007, 12:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigers_eye
Who said that? Any reference which connects to the Quran or the Prophet (Peace be upon him)?

How hard it is for the general public to believe in Allah and his messengers, his books, his angles, and the hereafter, give charity, be humble, perform hajj if one has the ability, say his/her prayers and fast, and not commit major sins? If this was that hard then Allah wouldn't prescribe us this religion. Madhab is created by Human. There are many things about future which is mentioned in the Holy Quran but that do not include madhab. If Madhab was that important then certainly the All-Knowing would have had mentioned it.

The words "cannot" and "must" is disturbing. You may want to rephrase the post. Relaying what one knows is very good. But trying to make it as the only way of life is not a good idea.
yes the mathab's were created by humans, hence the eponymous nature of them.
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  #10  
Old October 1, 2007, 05:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigers_eye

If Madhab was that important then certainly the All-Knowing would have had mentioned it.
Allah commands us in the Qur'an, "Ask the people of knowledge (remembrance) if you dont know".

Obviously, if one knows then he or she isn't obliged to follow a Madhab. Let me put this in perspective- Imam Al-Ghazzali, Imam Muhammad As-Shaibani, Imam An-Nabawi, Imam Ibn- Hajar Al-Asqalani, Imam Ibn-Rushd, Shaykh Ibn-Al-Arabi, Imam Al-Bukhari, Imam Muslim An-Nisapuri, Imam At-Tirmidhi, Ibn Khaldun, Imam Ibn At-Taymiyyah et el followed a madhab, although, they all were "mujtahid mutlaq" (absolute scholars) by their own right. The prerequisites of "Ijtihad" (independent reasoning) are explained below by Shaykh Abdal Hakim Murad who is a professor of theology at Cambridge University:


In order to protect the Shariah from the danger of innovation and distortion, the great scholars of usul (foundation of Islamic sciences)* laid down rigorous conditions which must be fulfilled by anyone wishing to claim the right of ijtihad for himself. These conditions include:
(a) mastery of the Arabic language, to minimise the possibility of misinterpreting Revelation on purely linguistic grounds;
(b) a profound knowledge of the Quran and Sunnah and the circumstances surrounding the revelation of each verse and hadith, together with a full knowledge of the Quranic and hadith commentaries, and a control of all the interpretative techniques discussed above;
(c) knowledge of the specialised disciplines of hadith, such as the assessment of narrators and of the matn [text];
(d) knowledge of the views of the Companions, Followers and the great imams, and of the positions and reasoning expounded in the textbooks of fiqh, combined with the knowledge of cases where a consensus (ijma) has been reached;
(e) knowledge of the science of juridical analogy (qiyas), its types and conditions;
(f) knowledge of ones own society and of public interest (maslahah);
(g) knowing the general objectives (maqasid) of the Shariah; (h) a high degree of intelligence and personal piety, combined with the Islamic virtues of compassion, courtesy, and modesty.


http://members.cox.net/arshad/newmadhh.htm
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  #11  
Old October 3, 2007, 03:48 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BanCricFan
Allah commands us in the Qur'an, "Ask the people of knowledge (remembrance) if you dont know".

Obviously, if one knows then he or she isn't obliged to follow a Madhab. Let me put this in perspective- Imam Al-Ghazzali, Imam Muhammad As-Shaibani, Imam An-Nabawi, Imam Ibn- Hajar Al-Asqalani, Imam Ibn-Rushd, Shaykh Ibn-Al-Arabi, Imam Al-Bukhari, Imam Muslim An-Nisapuri, Imam At-Tirmidhi, Ibn Khaldun, Imam Ibn At-Taymiyyah et el followed a madhab, although, they all were "mujtahid mutlaq" (absolute scholars) by their own right. The prerequisites of "Ijtihad" (independent reasoning) are explained below by Shaykh Abdal Hakim Murad who is a professor of theology at Cambridge University:


In order to protect the Shariah from the danger of innovation and distortion, the great scholars of usul (foundation of Islamic sciences)* laid down rigorous conditions which must be fulfilled by anyone wishing to claim the right of ijtihad for himself. These conditions include:
(a) mastery of the Arabic language, to minimise the possibility of misinterpreting Revelation on purely linguistic grounds;
(b) a profound knowledge of the Quran and Sunnah and the circumstances surrounding the revelation of each verse and hadith, together with a full knowledge of the Quranic and hadith commentaries, and a control of all the interpretative techniques discussed above;
(c) knowledge of the specialised disciplines of hadith, such as the assessment of narrators and of the matn [text];
(d) knowledge of the views of the Companions, Followers and the great imams, and of the positions and reasoning expounded in the textbooks of fiqh, combined with the knowledge of cases where a consensus (ijma) has been reached;
(e) knowledge of the science of juridical analogy (qiyas), its types and conditions;
(f) knowledge of ones own society and of public interest (maslahah);
(g) knowing the general objectives (maqasid) of the Shariah; (h) a high degree of intelligence and personal piety, combined with the Islamic virtues of compassion, courtesy, and modesty.


http://members.cox.net/arshad/newmadhh.htm
Many many thanks BanCricFan Bhai. You have done my job.
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  #12  
Old October 3, 2007, 03:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BD-Shardul
Many many thanks BanCricFan Bhai. You have done my job.
You're most welcome, bro! Hugs, all around!
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  #13  
Old October 1, 2007, 06:11 AM
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this is soooooo confusing...see the thing i know is our religion is islam..we are muslims and the muslim people are broken into sunni shiya etc etc. but now schools? why is this soo confusing? im embarrassed to say i dont now what school i follow .....[ this goes to show my great knowledge of my own religion..im ashamed in myself]
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  #14  
Old October 1, 2007, 07:40 AM
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Antora it is easy:

Muslim are divided into two groups:

(1) Sunni: They are original the Ahlus Sunnah Wal Jamayaat. All Khulafaye Rashedin, Sahabi, Tabeyi, and Tabe-tabeins are of this group.

(2) Shia: This group came into exsistence after the death of our holy prophet.

Sunnis are divided into four schools or creed: Hanafi, Shafei, Hambli, and Maleki.

One of the current makkah imams, Al Shuraim is a specialist about the schools of Islam.
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  #15  
Old October 1, 2007, 07:48 AM
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is creating divisions, segmentising, differentiating and reclassifying the faith the fashion these days? Or is ahl-as-sunnah-wal-jama'ah an appropriate definition? Of the people who stand in congregation in the tradition of the prophet?

The madhabs are about jurisprudence (fiqh) before anything else. They are not the first word or system of Islam. Please dont confuse people by asking what madhab they follow. If anything, please read the article given by BanCricFan in the shab-e-barat thread.

As mod: Religion should be left to individual choices on this otherwise apolitical, and secular forum. Lets not get into judgements about individuals in any way.
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  #16  
Old October 1, 2007, 08:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ammark
is creating divisions, segmentising, differentiating and reclassifying the faith the fashion these days? Or is ahl-as-sunnah-wal-jama'ah an appropriate definition? Of the people who stand in congregation in the tradition of the prophet?
My understanding is that when a religion (such as Islam, Christianity, Buddhism etc) grows exponentially and crosses several continents, it no longer stays intact. It's not to create divisions but just takes up a local flavour when it arrives at a new place.

Thankfully in case of Islam, it remained loosely intact due to the strict insistence for adherence to Quran. And any segments only varies politically (say which Imam to follow, which was good, which was bad, which hadith is unreliable etc) not religiously (like Christianity where one sect varies vastly with another in many cases).

On that note the thread question remains just but fact is most muslims (and thankfully may I add) don't go into the classifications. Indulging too much into those creates the division if at all.
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  #17  
Old October 1, 2007, 09:50 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moshin_31
Ramadan poll: There are four schools of law in Islam in the Sunni sector, these include Hanafi, Shafi'i, Malaki and Hanabi, but all of these confuse me between thier laws and regualtions, and I cannot decide which on is really the right one, plus there is a new type of school that has been formed, called the Salafi movement, they say they follow the rules from the beggining of time.
you might want to do do a little research within this forum. there are multiple posts about islamic jurisprudence including several by myself. almost 90% of south asian muslims were born into the hanafi madhab. there is no such school as hanabi, the school you were referring to is named after ahmad bin hanbal and thus named the hanbali school. each of the school is considered to be a creed and their following is seperated into geographical areas based on historical pattens of migration and conquest. it should be stressed that each of these madhabs are simply a way of interpreting (ijtihad) the fiqh. from which shariyya derive.

salafism basically refers to a return to the basic. for the purpose of your question, it means returning to the traditions followed by the first three generation of muslims. the basic idea is that human beings are possesed with reason. so they ought to make an effort to read the quran, read about the life of the prophet and prophetic traditions, and then use his internal faculties to reason, and thereby come to a conclusion about any specifics of islamic observance. ijtihad is the common term used to define interpretation.

i'd advise you to stop focusing on the madhabs or schools of jurisprudence and focus on islam itself. the latter refers to achieving peace within oneself and within one's community. one doesn't need schools of interpretation to achieve peace.
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  #18  
Old October 1, 2007, 10:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Puck
i'd advise you to stop focusing on the madhabs or schools of jurisprudence and focus on islam itself. the latter refers to achieving peace within oneself and within one's community. one doesn't need schools of interpretation to achieve peace.
The Quran commands us "Ask the people of knowledge (devout ulama) if you don't know". The quran also asks a rhetorical question "Are those who don't know equal to those who know?"

Therfore, I would say one DOES need "schools of jurisprudence" to practise Islam with knowledge and assurity to fulfill the aim which is success here and hereafter. Islam is a sophisticated way of life or a system and this has not come about without a methodology or a infra-stucrture!
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Old October 2, 2007, 02:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Puck
...each of the school is considered to be a creed and their following is seperated into geographical areas based on historical pattens of migration and conquest... .
Could you please expand this a bit more? Not sure I quite understand.
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  #20  
Old October 1, 2007, 11:07 AM
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Here is an excellent article/paper on the importance of following a madhab (school of Fiqh):

http://members.cox.net/arshad/newmadhh.htm
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  #21  
Old October 1, 2007, 12:52 PM
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whichever school calculates the earliest Maghrib/Iftaar !!!

just kidding.... ajke roja dhore gese.....
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  #22  
Old October 1, 2007, 06:33 PM
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Just a question, when it comes down to it, does it make a difference to what sect or school we belong to?

The fact is, in the end we all go to one place, and that it is to Allah.
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Old October 1, 2007, 07:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adel
Just a question, when it comes down to it, does it make a difference to what sect or school we belong to?

The fact is, in the end we all go to one place, and that it is to Allah.

"The Holy Quran commands Muslims to use their minds and reflective capacities; and the issue of following qualified scholarship is an area in which this faculty must be very carefully deployed. The basic point should be appreciated that no categoric difference exists between usul al-fiqh and any other specialised science requiring lengthy training. Shaykh Said Ramadan al-Buti, who has articulated the orthodox response to the anti-Madhhab trend in his book: Non-Madhhabism: The Greatest Bida Threatening the Islamic Sharia, likes to compare the science of deriving rulings to that of medicine. "If ones child is seriously ill", he asks, "does one look for oneself in the medical textbooks for the proper diagnosis and cure, or should one go to a trained medical practitioner?" Clearly, sanity dictates the latter option. And so it is in matters of religion, which are in reality even more important and potentially hazardous: we would be both foolish and irresponsible to try to look through the sources ourselves, and become our own muftis. Instead, we should recognise that those who have spent their entire lives studying the Sunnah and the principles of law are far less likely to be mistaken than we are.
Another metaphor might be added to this, this time borrowed from astronomy. We might compare the Quranic verses and the hadiths to the stars. With the naked eye, we are unable to see many of them clearly; so we need a telescope. If we are foolish, or proud, we may try to build one ourselves. If we are sensible and modest, however, we will be happy to use one built for us by Imam al-Shafi'i or Ibn Hanbal, and refined, polished and improved by generations of great astronomers. A madhhab is, after all, nothing more than a piece of precision equipment enabling us to see Islam with the maximum clarity possible. If we use our own devices, our amateurish attempts will inevitably distort our vision. "

-Understanding the four madhabs
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  #24  
Old October 1, 2007, 11:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BanCricFan
"The Holy Quran commands Muslims to use their minds and reflective capacities; and the issue of following qualified scholarship is an area in which this faculty must be very carefully deployed. The basic point should be appreciated that no categoric difference exists between usul al-fiqh and any other specialised science requiring lengthy training. Shaykh Said Ramadan al-Buti, who has articulated the orthodox response to the anti-Madhhab trend in his book: Non-Madhhabism: The Greatest Bida Threatening the Islamic Sharia, likes to compare the science of deriving rulings to that of medicine. "If ones child is seriously ill", he asks, "does one look for oneself in the medical textbooks for the proper diagnosis and cure, or should one go to a trained medical practitioner?" Clearly, sanity dictates the latter option. And so it is in matters of religion, which are in reality even more important and potentially hazardous: we would be both foolish and irresponsible to try to look through the sources ourselves, and become our own muftis. Instead, we should recognise that those who have spent their entire lives studying the Sunnah and the principles of law are far less likely to be mistaken than we are.
Another metaphor might be added to this, this time borrowed from astronomy. We might compare the Quranic verses and the hadiths to the stars. With the naked eye, we are unable to see many of them clearly; so we need a telescope. If we are foolish, or proud, we may try to build one ourselves. If we are sensible and modest, however, we will be happy to use one built for us by Imam al-Shafi'i or Ibn Hanbal, and refined, polished and improved by generations of great astronomers. A madhhab is, after all, nothing more than a piece of precision equipment enabling us to see Islam with the maximum clarity possible. If we use our own devices, our amateurish attempts will inevitably distort our vision. "

-Understanding the four madhabs
Thank you, BanCricFan bhai.
Please pardon my prior ignorance.
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  #25  
Old October 2, 2007, 02:53 AM
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Adel, no problem, bro! We have been given very little knowledge, indeed. Sooner we realize this and humble ourselves the better for us!

There is nothing wrong in admitting that we cannot know everything. And there is nothing wrong in asking a scholar or someone who has more knowledge than us. This is in essence what Madhab is.
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