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  #1  
Old November 1, 2017, 07:38 PM
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Default Education Background of Bangladeshi Cricketers

If we are to assume that by "Education Background" we are including both academic pursuits as well as the general intellect (discipline, problem-solving abilities etc.) of our cricketers, how would we rate our current national players?

The glaring issues are obvious - from the inability to learn from mistakes on the field from both a performance and strategic viewpoint, to embarrassing comments/actions off it - our cricketers are most definitely the dumbest, most idiotic group of players in international cricket, possibly only ahead of Pakistan by a whisker (which isn't worth mentioning, tbh).

This begs the question: why are the IQs of our cricketers bordering mental retardation? Why do they so often crumble under pressure? Why are they so hopeless at handling fame? Why are they so embarrassingly emotional to the point where you question whether they should see a doctor in relation to their Estrogen/Testosterone imbalance?

Is it simply a matter of education? Almost all of these guys come from rural backgrounds.

Would love to hear your thoughts.
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  #2  
Old November 1, 2017, 07:55 PM
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I think the answer is simple - some players find it too easy to dominate U/19 and domestics. They even show initial success when brought into international stage. But when hard times hit, they don't have much of a prior conditioning how to handle it (Soumya Sarkar for example). So you see Saif Hasan dominating domestics, yet in matter of few days choking against a spirited Afghan U/19 side.

Unfortunately our BCB bosses not realizing how important it's to develop competitive domestic structure, that will force the players to develop both skills and mental fortitude.
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  #3  
Old November 1, 2017, 07:58 PM
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aklemalp aklemalp is offline
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Quote:
This begs the question: why are the IQs of our cricketers bordering mental retardation?
This is kind of ironic. If you look at the records at the under-19 level on statsguru, you'll see that there are mostly BD players who prominent in there.

Th mentality of them is somewhat lost as they make their translation to the senior team. Guys who they are supposed to look up to are not well fit to play that role. If you look at Australia, you'll see the transition... from Steve Waugh to Ricky Ponting to Michael Clarke to Steve Smith.

At every point along the way, there are seniors to instill the best and the worst of international cricket. The intricate framework of it. Trying to seize the opportunity and momentum. To learn how to control a match.

In the other thread, I noticed the term 'student' of the game coming up. The best example of a young player/s who are students of the game is Shai Hope and Kraigg Brathwaite. Shai's ascendancy has been stunning. He won us a game in England. Kraigg made over 100 centuries in various stages of youth cricket before even making his test debut. These guys understand the nature of the game.

Okay, lemme divert back to the topic. Bangladesh player's are mighty talented. I give them that. They make their debuts, dominate, and then regressed to mediocrity. They have no basis of competitiveness. The lack of this was evident in the recent tour of SA. They were exposed. And no real authoritative figure to look up to.

One analogy I can think of is thinking of driving a car when you don't have a license. It's easy thinking about it, but gets exponentially harder if you have never done it before.

There is a vacuum that needs occupying, but no one wants to step up.

***

Please forgive me if I am being too critical
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  #4  
Old November 1, 2017, 08:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aklemalp
This is kind of ironic. If you look at the records at the under-19 level on statsguru, you'll see that there are mostly BD players who prominent in there.

Th mentality of them is somewhat lost as they make their translation to the senior team. Guys who they are supposed to look up to are not well fit to play that role. If you look at Australia, you'll see the transition... from Steve Waugh to Ricky Ponting to Michael Clarke to Steve Smith.

At every point along the way, there are seniors to instill the best and the worst of international cricket. The intricate framework of it. Trying to seize the opportunity and momentum. To learn how to control a match.

In the other thread, I noticed the term 'student' of the game coming up. The best example of a young player/s who are students of the game is Shai Hope and Kraigg Brathwaite. Shai's ascendancy has been stunning. He won us a game in England. Kraigg made over 100 centuries in various stages of youth cricket before even making his test debut. These guys understand the nature of the game.

Okay, lemme divert back to the topic. Bangladesh player's are mighty talented. I give them that. They make their debuts, dominate, and then regressed to mediocrity. They have no basis of competitiveness. The lack of this was evident in the recent tour of SA. They were exposed. And no real authoritative figure to look up to.

One analogy I can think of is thinking of driving a car when you don't have a license. It's easy thinking about it, but gets exponentially harder if you have never done it before.

There is a vacuum that needs occupying, but no one wants to step up.

***

Please forgive me if I am being too critical
Genuinely curious - how strong is the domestic setup of the West Indies? Obviously a far richer history than Bangladesh's, but what state is it in now, during the dark age of West Indies cricket?
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  #5  
Old November 1, 2017, 08:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cricket_king
Genuinely curious - how strong is the domestic setup of the West Indies? Obviously a far richer history than Bangladesh's, but what state is it in now, during the dark age of West Indies cricket?
To be honest, we are slowly making our way up. We have some great talents coming up, especially in the fast bowling department (refer to Gowza' thread on WI fast bowling prospects). The first round of our First Class competition just ended. Denesh Ramdin was outstanding, he made a lot of runs against Barbados. My fellow countryman and club member, Veerasammy Permaul took a 10 wicket haul to wallop Jamaica.

Over the past few years, my home country Guyana has been dominating in this format.

Look out for this youth player: Bhaskar Yadram. He is like Kallis. He's gonna be playing the Under-19 world cup next year.

To he honest, I am loving the way out cricket has resurrected. Jimmy Adams is responsible for talent searching, and he's doing a wonderful job.

I could go on and on, but that will take up a lot of time. I'm a proud West Indian at the present moment.
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Old November 1, 2017, 08:41 PM
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I think the other major issue with our set-up is not having well qualified coaches/mentors. We have people like Sarwar Imran, Mizanur Rahman Babul, and Zafrul Ehsan as our top coaches, people that have no credential as players. Kudos to them for achieving levels they have as coaches, but does not make sense to me how they can teach match intelligence when they have no experience even playing at club levels.

We are seeing more of the ex-players (Sujon, Pilot, Rafique, Talha, Tapash) taking up coaching roles. But I don't think we have enough of them yet. BCB should give more incentive to ex-players to take up coaching/mentoring roles.
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  #7  
Old November 2, 2017, 04:22 AM
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Shahriar Nafees completed or pursued a MBA right?

I would be curious to learn more about the education provided at BKSP. How much emphasis is placed on the academic aspect of their development? Does the school encourage critical thinking or simply rote-learning and trying to get students to pass? What syllabus do they follow? How good are the teachers?

Does anyone have personal insight into this?
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  #8  
Old November 2, 2017, 08:51 AM
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Someone mentioned Musfiq is MA pash/fail in history?

Do you think if he completes his PHD, his quality of his captaincy or his intelligence (in general) will increase?


Ashraful is very chalu maal. Did he passed High School? If he had a BS (not Bull Sh$t, Bachelor of Science) or a BBA , do you think he would have done better with his cricket career?
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  #9  
Old November 2, 2017, 09:04 AM
adamnsu adamnsu is offline
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I remember a time when certain pvt. unis used to have "students" who played for the national side. Word has it, they wanted to boost their own cricket team.
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Old November 2, 2017, 10:12 AM
5tonne 5tonne is offline
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A bit off-topic but I think the socio-enomomic background and cricket being the only-game-we-are-good-at have a lot to do with our cricketers losing their way early in their careers. They work really hard to get into team and make their place somewhat permanent. And by that time they earn some handsome money by BD standard and start chasing money forgetting their childhood dream to become national cricket heroes. As they gain easy fame due to cricket being the only sport we are good at, they attract sponsors easily and get busy with making commercials, becoming brand embassedors etc. Their focus shifts from becoming better cricketers to be rich men. They start opening restaurants and other business ventures which takes lot of time and focus away. The hunger for getting better everyday dies at that point. And the performance starts to decline. This has been the case for quite a few promising cricketers in recent years.
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