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  #26  
Old July 4, 2018, 04:11 AM
adamnsu adamnsu is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mufi_02
Adorsholipi is good if you want yor kids to learn Bangla. That’s how we all started in kindergarten and home. O te Ojogor, I te Idur.

Mina is a good educational cartoon teaching family and societal values.

So these are not bad suggestions for anyone who wants to raise their kids with some Bengali language and heritage.
I used to read Amar Boi when I was abroad. Those are also decent books. I had to learn because I was going to do my education in Bangladesh. But apart from the sentimental value, I wonder how important it is for a child being brought up abroad it is to learn Bangla. For a child of Muslim faith I think Arabic might be more useful.

IMO I think learning heritage for a child is extremely much more important. But I think sitting down with a child and telling them about Bangladesh helps alot as well.

That being said, Mina was a decent cartoon with much moral values.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DinRaat.
I think he is joking around.
Perhaps. But I was asking for clarification
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  #27  
Old July 4, 2018, 11:15 AM
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Adam bhai, ami kintu serious silam. Bangla shikhkhar beparey ami gafiloti pochondo kori na.
Amar jonmo ekhaney kintu amar baap-ma Adorsholipi ar Bangla medium er class 1 - 6 er shob boi ekhaney niye ashsilo. Tarpor prottek summer vacationey, ami oi boigua portam ar copy korey lekhalekhi o korechi.
Tarpor ek bosor deshey silam GCSE deoar por. Tokhon band shongeet, natok, cinema, tin goenda , Feluda - eishober shathey aro familair holam.
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  #28  
Old July 6, 2018, 02:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adamnsu
I used to read Amar Boi when I was abroad. Those are also decent books. I had to learn because I was going to do my education in Bangladesh. But apart from the sentimental value, I wonder how important it is for a child being brought up abroad it is to learn Bangla. For a child of Muslim faith I think Arabic might be more useful.

IMO I think learning heritage for a child is extremely much more important. But I think sitting down with a child and telling them about Bangladesh helps alot as well.

That being said, Mina was a decent cartoon with much moral values.




Perhaps. But I was asking for clarification
Speaking only from personal experience, I am extremely grateful to my parents for teaching me Bangla. I remember hating reading Amar boi. Those stories never interested me and I always asked myself why I was reading these. But really, it helped me develop a great foundation for my Bangla and helped me be able to read other Bengali literature. I don't know if and when I become a parent whether I will have the same patience my parents did to teach my children Bangla, but I believe it's very important. I love travelling to Bangladesh and what makes things easier for me is being able to read the signs in Bengali or just waking up in the morning and seeing the newspaper and flicking through it and actually being able to read what it says. It made me develop a sense of belonging to a country I've never lived in. Bangla is also spoken by over 215 million people around the world. This number will only increase and so in the long run, it might become one of those languages like French or Spanish that we will need for work relate/diplomatic purposes.

Also, going to present a very controversial (?) and unpopular opinion here, but I dislike the concept of Arabic being learned for the purpose of religion. Unless of course the person wants to do that themselves. I've always had this internal battle as to why everything in Islam has to be Arabic. I mean, I understand why but for me I always believed that religion is personal and you can pray/speak to God in any language and it will be valued the same as if you were to do it in Arabic. Again, just a personal opinion. I know it's controversial but that's what I've always felt and although I know the reasoning behind the emphasis of Arabic, that's not how all people may want to connect to their creator.
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  #29  
Old July 6, 2018, 03:43 AM
adamnsu adamnsu is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shingara
Adam bhai, ami kintu serious silam. Bangla shikhkhar beparey ami gafiloti pochondo kori na.
Amar jonmo ekhaney kintu amar baap-ma Adorsholipi ar Bangla medium er class 1 - 6 er shob boi ekhaney niye ashsilo. Tarpor prottek summer vacationey, ami oi boigua portam ar copy korey lekhalekhi o korechi.
Tarpor ek bosor deshey silam GCSE deoar por. Tokhon band shongeet, natok, cinema, tin goenda , Feluda - eishober shathey aro familair holam.
Thanks for the clarification my savoury bhai

I think for kids who are not going to Bangladesh to live it is not essential to learn Bangla IMO despite the sentiment of it. Although I would stress on the teaching the culture of Bangladesh. Majority of Bangladeshis in the UK take Bangla as a second language. Also when I talk to the expats (Non Sylheti) most of them teach the spoken aspect of it.

In the car I always play some Bangla songs from Fuad for example. I will also start watching with him the funny village dramas too.
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  #30  
Old July 6, 2018, 04:22 AM
adamnsu adamnsu is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Antora
Speaking only from personal experience, I am extremely grateful to my parents for teaching me Bangla. I remember hating reading Amar boi. Those stories never interested me and I always asked myself why I was reading these. But really, it helped me develop a great foundation for my Bangla and helped me be able to read other Bengali literature. I don't know if and when I become a parent whether I will have the same patience my parents did to teach my children Bangla, but I believe it's very important. I love travelling to Bangladesh and what makes things easier for me is being able to read the signs in Bengali or just waking up in the morning and seeing the newspaper and flicking through it and actually being able to read what it says. It made me develop a sense of belonging to a country I've never lived in. Bangla is also spoken by over 215 million people around the world. This number will only increase and so in the long run, it might become one of those languages like French or Spanish that we will need for work relate/diplomatic purposes.

Also, going to present a very controversial (?) and unpopular opinion here, but I dislike the concept of Arabic being learned for the purpose of religion. Unless of course the person wants to do that themselves. I've always had this internal battle as to why everything in Islam has to be Arabic. I mean, I understand why but for me I always believed that religion is personal and you can pray/speak to God in any language and it will be valued the same as if you were to do it in Arabic. Again, just a personal opinion. I know it's controversial but that's what I've always felt and although I know the reasoning behind the emphasis of Arabic, that's not how all people may want to connect to their creator.
Thank you for sharing your views.

I had fond memories of Amar Boi as it was easy to ready. Some good stories about Jaynal Abedin and Matiru Rahman that I can remember from such a long long time ago. However I had to learn Bangla when I was abroad as I was going to stay in Bangladesh for my schooling, and didnt like it much as I was being deprived of my free time. But it did help me get an extra A in my O levels.

On another note, I see English medium kids in Bangladesh being quite poor in reading and writing Bangla as because the GSCE requirements have always been quite basic IMO. No one I knew read literature books even Humayan Ahmed even after learning Bangla for more years than I did. Damn I could read a paper more fluently than my friends from the likes of Scholastica, BIT and Willes Little Fleur.

Apart from the sentimental value, learning Bangla might not be too practical for most kids growing abroad unless they are planning to come back to live in Bangladesh for a long period. Kids in UK these are learning Mandarin as it has over 1 billion speakers and is a major trading partner. This might end up as a hobby for many to teach their kids Bangla. But speaking and understanding Bangla is what is followed in almost all households. We always stress in speaking Bangla at home and also my inlaws.

For Muslims there are guidelines for connecting with the Creator, and one is through prayer which is in Arabic. As these are the rules in Islam one has to abide by it there is no two ways about it. Although a few things I have learnt from priests is that the intentions of prayer can be done in any language and not Arabic. But if one goes out of this norm of praying in Arabic, I feel one is in danger of creating a different religion but Allah knows best. Its like learning a subject in English, but during the exams writing answers (despite being correct) in Bangla , but then again it is all upto the examiner of how much marks they will give.

Like you mentioned earlier with the joy of reading Bangla, a Muslim child will be able to read Arabic, the words they use while praying. This is one of the reasons we have put my son for reading Arabic.

Last edited by adamnsu; July 6, 2018 at 09:48 AM..
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  #31  
Old July 6, 2018, 04:34 AM
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Adam bhai, this has been going on for decades where kids grow up abroad and their parents encourage them to speak English at home and never gave any preference to Bengali.
In the end, after the kids grow up to be teenagers, oi parentgulai afsos korey .. Ish, amar cheley jodi Bangla parto. But, by then it's too late. If kids aren't forced to learn at a young age, boro houar por ar kisu hoy na.

My best friend is a British Syleti. He was born in BD but came here when he was 5. He can't speak/read or write Bengali but he has a slight interest and tries to use Bengali words in his conversations with me. He also likes Bangladesh and finds even a rickshaw fascinating. His wife is also Syleti but was born here. She has no interest in Bengali or Bangladesh. None of them can teach their son Bengali as they don't know it themselves!

I went to a Pohela boishakh cultural event few months ago and the little kids running around were conversing in English amongst themselves and the parents were also instructing them in English like 'Kashfia, ma, come eat rice' lol
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  #32  
Old July 6, 2018, 04:41 AM
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Maybe watch some old BTV dubed series with the kids like Sinbad ?
https://youtu.be/P6w-h06L2Ds

There were many more like Gul Sanobar, Hatem tai, Sword of Tipu Sultan etc.
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  #33  
Old July 6, 2018, 07:24 AM
adamnsu adamnsu is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shingara
Adam bhai, this has been going on for decades where kids grow up abroad and their parents encourage them to speak English at home and never gave any preference to Bengali.
In the end, after the kids grow up to be teenagers, oi parentgulai afsos korey .. Ish, amar cheley jodi Bangla parto. But, by then it's too late. If kids aren't forced to learn at a young age, boro houar por ar kisu hoy na.

My best friend is a British Syleti. He was born in BD but came here when he was 5. He can't speak/read or write Bengali but he has a slight interest and tries to use Bengali words in his conversations with me. He also likes Bangladesh and finds even a rickshaw fascinating. His wife is also Syleti but was born here. She has no interest in Bengali or Bangladesh. None of them can teach their son Bengali as they don't know it themselves!

I went to a Pohela boishakh cultural event few months ago and the little kids running around were conversing in English amongst themselves and the parents were also instructing them in English like 'Kashfia, ma, come eat rice' lol
I dont think the British Sylhetis I know not regret learning Bangla. Most of them can speak Sylheti only and I feel they are happy with that. The younger people dont want to go to Bangladesh regularly as its expensive and its not a holiday for many due to the hassle.

But yes most people in their 30s or 40s among the British Sylhetis (born in UK) tend to speak with their kids in English. Bottom line is Bangla and Sylheti is only used when speaking to people who normally dont speak English so the use of this is quite limited as well.
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  #34  
Old July 6, 2018, 09:34 AM
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Forget Arabic or Bangla. I’m teaching my kids Sylethi.
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  #35  
Old July 7, 2018, 06:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adamnsu
I dont think the British Sylhetis I know not regret learning Bangla. Most of them can speak Sylheti only and I feel they are happy with that. The younger people dont want to go to Bangladesh regularly as its expensive and its not a holiday for many due to the hassle.

But yes most people in their 30s or 40s among the British Sylhetis (born in UK) tend to speak with their kids in English. Bottom line is Bangla and Sylheti is only used when speaking to people who normally dont speak English so the use of this is quite limited as well.
My wife said this about the British Syleti youngsters : Farmer murgi money korey farm hochchey prithibir shobcheye bhalo jayga. Farmer bairey life nai.

We digress.

Btw, about Scholastica kids.. apparently the school has strict rules that you can't speak Bengali onsite. If you do, a complaint is made and your parents have to pay a visit. That's why they speak like foreign Bangladeshi kids.
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  #36  
Old July 7, 2018, 07:28 AM
adamnsu adamnsu is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shingara
My wife said this about the British Syleti youngsters : Farmer murgi money korey farm hochchey prithibir shobcheye bhalo jayga. Farmer bairey life nai.

We digress.

Btw, about Scholastica kids.. apparently the school has strict rules that you can't speak Bengali onsite. If you do, a complaint is made and your parents have to pay a visit. That's why they speak like foreign Bangladeshi kids.
Top marks to Bhabi for that analogy . But what I don’t get is why they think free range murgi are not good.

Well when I was in school we couldn’t speak in Bangla by default as there were kids of so many nationalities. Even the care taker spoke in English and could also manage a conversation in French.

But our Principal always stressed on being Bangladeshi. Although I never heard her speak in Bangla as she always spoke with a posh British accent.
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  #37  
Old July 8, 2018, 01:15 AM
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Good thread. In my opinion, a child is at more advantage if the child is exposed to more than one language while young. Since I am a Bangladeshi muslim, when I become a parent I would like to teach my children Bangla, and Arabic. If the child learns Spanish/French and mandarin in school, that pretty much covers many lands. One of my good friends once told me that you should through all the knowledge at youngsters, and they will catch whatever they can to summarize the importance of languages (including coding.)
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  #38  
Old July 8, 2018, 05:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adamnsu
Top marks to Bhabi for that analogy . But what I don’t get is why they think free range murgi are not good.
Ego or perhaps false sense of superiority.
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  #39  
Old July 8, 2018, 12:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shingara
Ego or perhaps false sense of superiority.
I don’t want to start a war, but I think Sylethi’s are quite tribal. That is why anyone outside the division is treated as an outsider which I have seen in the UK. It’s almost like a caste system when Sylethis get married.

That is why I think it is important to teach kids that we are all under one same brand despite us being from different regions.
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  #40  
Old July 8, 2018, 12:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by icricket
Good thread. In my opinion, a child is at more advantage if the child is exposed to more than one language while young. Since I am a Bangladeshi muslim, when I become a parent I would like to teach my children Bangla, and Arabic. If the child learns Spanish/French and mandarin in school, that pretty much covers many lands. One of my good friends once told me that you should through all the knowledge at youngsters, and they will catch whatever they can to summarize the importance of languages (including coding.)
We heard of a white family who’s toddler started speaking in Bangla because of their Nanny.

But yes kids are like sponge when learning new stuff. So I also think the younger they learn languages the easier it is for them.
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  #41  
Old July 10, 2018, 01:52 PM
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Alhamdulillah, I'm blessed with 3 girls/women in my family - my mom, wife and our 3 year old daughter. Yes, teaching her Bangla is a concern/struggle for me. We, especially her Dadi, don't converse in English with her at all, yet she picks the English words rather easily, mainly due to her growing addiction to Kids Youtube (another concern).

I'm a lazy person by nature. But I try to take her outdoor (driveway, backyard, nearby park etc.) during spring/summer here in Canada. I always try to buy developmental toys for her. I've made a small 3-wheeler robot for her that she loves now. I always try to test her math/logic skills. Born in a Bangladeshi-Muslim family and growing up in Canada, she would probably learn English, Bangla, Arabic, French and Hindi (as her mom is a fluent speaker).
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  #42  
Old July 11, 2018, 03:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by R0ssei
Alhamdulillah, I'm blessed with 3 girls/women in my family - my mom, wife and our 3 year old daughter. Yes, teaching her Bangla is a concern/struggle for me. We, especially her Dadi, don't converse in English with her at all, yet she picks the English words rather easily, mainly due to her growing addiction to Kids Youtube (another concern).

I'm a lazy person by nature. But I try to take her outdoor (driveway, backyard, nearby park etc.) during spring/summer here in Canada. I always try to buy developmental toys for her. I've made a small 3-wheeler robot for her that she loves now. I always try to test her math/logic skills. Born in a Bangladeshi-Muslim family and growing up in Canada, she would probably learn English, Bangla, Arabic, French and Hindi (as her mom is a fluent speaker).
Yes kids tend to pick up English more easily due to the influence of media around them these days. We also try to speak in Bangla at home with my son and he does understand everything but doesnt always reply back but hopefully as he gets older he will use Bangla more InshahAllah.

We once were invited to this friends house with a theme of dressing up in traditional Bangladeshi clothing, as they were getting worried their daughter was becoming too white and rejecting traditional clothes.

I usually play football and cricket with my son when I get the chance after I come back from work. I think these memories are something the child will cherish forever. We always try to look for something for him to do even during summer holidays as his other extra circular activities remain closed(as we dont travel abroad then). I think we might restart his tennis lesson, as I saw that tennis schools for children under 7 years old is normally a waste of time where I live.

Some of my friends kids also go to Drama clubs during summer, as this apparently helps build confidence especially speaking to an audience.

My cousins had to learn French when they moved to Canada many years ago, and the government were giving money to parents to make their children learn the language. I am not sure if this is a common practise these days.
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  #43  
Old July 29, 2018, 12:40 PM
adamnsu adamnsu is offline
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Was thinking of what you guys thinking of when and how much time should a child spend on a tablet/iPad?
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