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  #26  
Old August 2, 2007, 07:04 AM
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i m surprised
it took 17 posts to mention tamim iqbal khan name
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  #27  
Old August 2, 2007, 09:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nfsunited
i m surprised
it took 17 posts to mention tamim iqbal khan name

don't be surprised, he wasn't good enough to play in the team
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  #28  
Old August 2, 2007, 02:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Puck
don't be surprised, he wasn't good enough to play in the team
OI..............our tamim wil do good in dis team
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  #29  
Old August 2, 2007, 07:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rah
OI..............our tamim wil do good in dis team
he would do well in any 'dis' team, but not good enough to represent the khan or muhammad clan!
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  #30  
Old August 8, 2007, 12:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nfsunited
i m surprised
it took 17 posts to mention tamim iqbal khan name
and also how can one did not mantion the name of Irfan Khan Pathan
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total odi's b/w pak and ind=108,pak won=64,ind won=40
total test's b/w pak and ind=56,pak won=12,ind won=8
all i can say is
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  #31  
Old August 8, 2007, 01:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pathan
and also how can one did not mantion the name of Irfan Khan Pathan
Or Yusuf Khan Pathan ... maybe time to ponder an all Yusuf team?
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  #32  
Old August 8, 2007, 03:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sohel NR
Or Yusuf Khan Pathan ... maybe time to ponder an all Yusuf team?
NO there is not many yousuf cricketers in this world but there are many michael in the world so we may make a team consisting names of michael hussy,clark,vaughn,beven
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  #33  
Old August 8, 2007, 03:33 AM
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now that our khan's xi completed we can confirm the squad

1.mohsin hasan KHAN
Mohsin Khan was not alone in being a Pakistani who was handsome both in appearance and in batting. But he could claim that as an opening batsman he came closer than any of his countrymen has done to mastering the extra bounce of Australian pitches: in successive Tests in 1983-84 he scored 149 at Adelaide and 153 at Melbourne. Before then he had also become the first Pakistani to make a double-hundred in a Test at Lord's, so it was quite a loss when he married an Indian actress, moved to Bombay and dabbled in film acting himself. He had it in him to be a star of the crease if not the screen.

2.tamim iqbal KHAN
Tamim Iqbal is one of Bangladesh's most assured young batsmen. His most notable innings came for the Under-19s against England at the end of 2005 when he smashed 112 from just 71 balls to help Bangladesh cruise to victory. Tamim is the younger brother of Bangladesh international Nafis Iqbal Khan and nephew of former Bangladesh skipper Akram Khan. The 17-year-old left-hander is regarded as one of the most exciting prospects in Bangladesh cricket and is arguably the hardest hitter of the cricket ball in the country. He made his one-day debut against Zimbabwe in February 2007 and was included in the World Cup squad after playing just two matches.

3.younis KHAN
A middle-order batsman, Younis Khan is fearless, as befits his Pathan ancestry. He plays with a flourish and is especially strong in the arc from backward point to extra cover. He is prone to getting down on one knee and driving extravagantly. But this flamboyance is coupled with grit. His main weaknesses are playing away from the body and leaving straight balls.

Younis was one of the few batsmen who retained his place in the team after Pakistan's disastrous World Cup campaign in 2003, but lost it soon after due to a string of poor scores in the home series against Bangladesh and South Africa. He came back for the one-day series against India, but failed to cement a place in the Test side. He is among the better fielders in Pakistan and he took a world-record four catches in one innings as substitute during Pakistan's demolition of Bangladesh in the 2001-02 Asian Test Championship.

He displayed further versatility by keeping and winning the Man of the Match award against Zimbabwe in the Paktel Cup. But it was his return to the side in October 2004, at the pivotal one-down, against Sri Lanka in Karachi that laid the groundwork for his emergence as a force in Pakistan cricket. He was the top run-getter in the disastrous 3-0 whitewash in Australia immediately after and on the tour of India, for which Younis was elevated to vice-captain, he blossomed. After a horror start to the series he came back strongly, capping things off with a matchwinning 267 in the final Test.

Since then, barring minor troughs such as the 2005-06 series against England at home, his career has been one elongated peak, scoring hundreds against India and England for fun and becoming Pakistan's most successful one-down in recent memory. More importantly, the tour to India also showcased his potential as a future captain of Pakistan and his energetic and astute leadership has impressed many people. As captain in Inzamam's absence he led the side to a disastrous loss against the West Indies in 2005 but also to a memorable win against India in Karachi in January 2006.

He blotted his book by suddenly resigning from the captaincy in Inzamam's absence for the Champions Trophy 2006, only to return a day later and lead a scandal-afflicted side to a disappointing first round exit. He was the favourite to take over the captaincy after Pakistan's ignominous World Cup ouster in 2007 but he turned down the captaincy citing mental strain and decided to honour his commitment with Yorkshire by making himself unavailable for Pakistan. Younis, however, was named in the 15-man squad for Pakistan tour to Scotland to play the hosts as well as India in July.

4.imran KHAN(C)
Few would dispute that Imran was the finest cricketer Pakistan has produced, or the biggest heart-throb. Suave, erudite and monstrously talented, he gave cricket in the subcontinent real sex appeal in the 1970s and 1980s. As such he and TV completed the popularisation of the game in his country which Hanif Mohammad and the radio had begun. Thousands, if not millions, who had never dreamt of bowling fast on heartless baked mud suddenly wanted to emulate Imran and his lithe bounding run, his leap and his reverse-swinging yorker. He also made himself into an allrounder worth a place for his batting alone, and captained Pakistan as well as anyone, rounding off his career with the 1992 World Cup. He played hardly any domestic cricket in Pakistan: instead he just flew in for home series from Worcestershire or Sussex, or rather from the more fashionable London salons. His averages (37 with the bat, 22 with the ball) put him at the top of the quartet of allrounders (Ian Botham, Richard Hadlee and Kapil Dev being the others) who dominated Test cricket in the 1980s. And whereas Botham declined steadily, Imran just got better and better: in his last ten years of international cricket he played 51 Tests, averaging a sensational 50 with the bat and 19 with the ball. He gave no quarter during some memorable battles with West Indies - Pakistan drew three series with them at a time when everybody else was being bounced out of sight - and he led Pakistan to their first series victory in England in 1987, taking 10 for 77 with an imperious display in the decisive victory at Headingley. After retirement he remained a high-profile figure, with his marriage - and subsequent split with - the socialite Jemima Goldsmith and a not entirely successful move into the labyrinthine world of Pakistan politics.

5.majid KHAN
All grace and fluency, Majid Khan played in the spirit of an English amateur of a bygone era. He had a distant air which sometimes gave the impression that he wasn't really trying. Majid was a Cambridge Blue and he followed his father Jahangir Khan into Test cricket, though he never matched his father's feat of hitting a sparrow in flight at Lord's. He started his career as a pace bowler, but a back injury and doubts over the legitimacy of his bouncer turned him into an occasional offspinner. His batting prowess quickly moved him up the order, and he eventually formed one half of a highly successful opening partnership with Sadiq Mohammad. Majestic driving and hooking were his hallmarks, and he could score effortlessly at speed. His career ended on a sad note when his cousin Imran Khan was forced to drop him, which soured their relationship. He was a no-nonsense administrator, but he signed off by fanning match-fixing claims over the 1999 World Cup.

6.shahid KHAN afridi
In cricket, Shahid Afridi is the maddest of mad maxes. A flamboyant allrounder introduced to international cricket as a 16-year-old legspinner, he surprised everyone but himself by pinch-hitting the fastest one-day hundred in his maiden innings. Afridi is a compulsive shot-maker and although until 2004 it was too often his undoing, causing him to float in and out of the team, a combination of maturity on and off the field and a sympathetic coach in Bob Woolmer, saw Afridi blossom into one of modern-day cricket's most dangerous players and a vital cog in Pakistan's revival in 2005. A string of incisive contributions from June 2004 culminated in a violent century against India in Kanpur in April 2005; remarkably it was the joint second fastest ODI century in terms of balls faced. A few weeks before, by smashing the joint second fastest Test half-century at Bangalore and taking crucial last day wickets, Afridi had helped Pakistan memorably level the Test series. So his year continued; a Test century against the West Indies and contributions against England at the end of the year. He went berserk against India on the flattest of pitches with two centuries, including a Test best 156 in January 2006. An Afridi virtuoso is laced with fearless lofted drives and short-arm jabs over midwicket. He is at his best when forcing straight and at his weakest pushing at the ball just outside off. The biggest improvement has been in Afridi's legspin; previously underrated, they are now integral in the ODI side and curiously effective at key moments in Tests. When the conditions are with him, he gets turn as well as some lazy drift, but his box of tricks is the key, boasting a vicious faster ball and a conventional off-spinner as well. His allround skills are completed by agile fielding and among the strongest arms in the game; he also possesses the firmest handshake in international cricket. Again he shocked everyone but himself when, after finally becoming a fixture in the Pakistan side, and a thrillingly bombastic one at that, he announced a temporary 'retirement' from Test cricket, citing an increasingly heavy playing schedule. To less surprise, he retracted his retirement two weeks later. Since then he has been dropped again from the Test team in England and his place in the ODI side has been in flux. He remains, though, an original and a dangerous one at that.

7.moin KHAN+
Renowned for his combative skills, Moin Khan has spent most of his career slugging it out with Rashid Latif for the keeper's gloves. His batting ability has generally kept him in front although Latif is a better keeper. An effective rather than stylish batsman, Moin relishes a crisis and has held together Pakistan's lower order time and again. His quick feet and improvisation are even more productive in one-day cricket where he scores at speed. Behind the stumps, he is the chirpiest of keepers and the stump mike has revealed his full repertoire to the world. "Well bowled" and "shabash" are his most familiar soundbites. As captain, Moin struggled to get his way amid Pakistan's incessant in-fighting and was too defensive, as when England triumphed in the gloom of Karachi. Moin played through most of the 2003-04 season, missing only the last two Tests against India due to injury. However, his wicketkeeping form wasn't entirely convincing, and with Kamran Akmal staking a strong claim, Moin's days as an international cricketer might be drawing to a close.

8.irfan KHAN pathan
Irfan Khan Pathan was considered by many, with reason, as the most talented swing and seam bowler to emerge from India since Kapil Dev. Within a couple of years in international cricket, he was thought of as a possible successor for Kapil in the allround department. When he made his Test debut in Australia in 2003-04, it was with the energy of a 19-year-old, but a composed nous that was striking even for one who had been specifically readied for the purpose via the A-team and age-group channels. His instinct is not merely what to bowl to who and when, but also to keep learning new tricks. He played a big part in India's one-day and the Test series wins on their revival tour of Pakistan. His batting soon took off and he was regularly pushed up the order - his first stint at No.3 resulted in a spectacular 83 against Sri Lanka at Nagpur - and he often bailed India out of strife in the Test arena as well. His bowling form, though, nosedived in 2006, and he struggled to make it to both the Test and ODI teams when the year ended, becoming the first Indian player to be sent back from a tour (South Africa) to concentrate on domestic cricket. He did make it to the World Cup squad but didn't figure in a single game during India's disappointing campaign, after which he was dropped from both the Test and one-day sides.

9.arshad KHAN
For two reasons, Arshad Khan shouldn't really be an offspinner; one, he is from Peshawar, traditional home for fast bowlers and two, he is tall enough to be one. But unlike the recent vintage of Pakistani off-spinners - with Saqlain Mushtaq as prototype - he not only has a refreshingly conventional action, he possesses too, a conventional approach to his art. He was initially picked to play against the West Indies in 1997-98 and has since developed into a steady, generally restrictive bowler, reliant on bounce and on certain pitches, significant turn. A year after his debut he took 5-38 and helped Pakistan beat Sri Lanka in the Asian Test Championship final at Dhaka. He was then in and out of the Test side till 2001, when, after a Test against England, he was overlooked for a further four years. But a strong showing in Pakistan's domestic championship earned him a recall for Pakistan's tour of India in 2005. He was only picked for one Test, the final one in Bangalore, but like most of his team-mates, played a pivotal role, picking up two crucial wickets in the second innings including that of Rahul Dravid. Although his chances at Test level may be limited with the choices Pakistan possess, he will remain an option for the ODI side, especially with the introduction of the Supersub rule. (Decemberl 2005)

10.zaheer KHAN
Like Waqar Younis a decade before, Zaheer Khan yorked his way into the collective consciousness of the cricket world: his performances at the ICC Knockout Trophy in Kenya in September 2000 announced the arrival of an all-too-rare star in the Indian fast-bowling firmament. He might just as easily have come from the Pakistani pace stable: well-built, quick and unfazed by a batsman's reputation, Zaheer could move the ball both ways off the wicket and swing the old ball at some pace. After initially struggling to establish himself as a new-ball bowler, he came of age on the 2002 tour of the West Indies, when he led the line with great heart. His subsequent displays in England and New Zealand - not to mention some eye-catching moments at the World Cup - established him at the forefront of India's new pace generation, but a hamstring injury saw him relegated to bit-part performer as Indian cricket scripted some of its finest moments away in Australia and Pakistan. After that, his pace has dropped and his attitude was questioned, as a new breed of pace bowlers pushed him aside to move to the front of the queue. Zaheer's response was to head to Worcestershire and take 78 wickets in the 2006 county season, a performance that earned him a recall for the tour of South Africa. He was the perfect foil for Sreesanth there, and he then regained his status as leader of the pack with a matchwinning display at Trent Bridge, as India won only their fifth Test on English soil.

11.KHAN mohammad
A Prolific Speedster is a Pakistan's first geniun stirke bowler.He achieved the distinction of taking his country's first Test wicket, of Pankaj Roy, who was bowled round his leg for seven.Khan Mohammad, Pakistan's outstanding bowler of the 1950s, presently runs a Travel agency in Ealing, West London.
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  #34  
Old August 8, 2007, 03:48 AM
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Add nafis iqbal khan and akram khan to the list well maybe not akram khan but nafis iqbal khan should be there.
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  #35  
Old August 8, 2007, 10:26 AM
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please do start a chowdhury team.....

such as chowdhury shahriar (me), dipu roy chowdhury.....
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  #36  
Old August 9, 2007, 05:10 AM
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good stuff abdulraheem bhai
keep it up
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  #37  
Old August 10, 2007, 05:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by abdulrahee
now that our khan's xi completed we can confirm the squad

1.mohsin hasan KHAN
2.tamim iqbal KHAN
3.younis KHAN
4.imran KHAN(C)
5.majid KHAN
6.shahid KHAN afridi
7.moin KHAN+
8.irfan KHAN pathan
9.arshad KHAN
10.zaheer KHAN
11.KHAN mohammad

.
it is an amazing team i love this team (b/c i m also khan) a really good team with one geniun opener and the other dashing one and the likes of afridi and what more you want but a captain like imran
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total odi's b/w pak and ind=108,pak won=64,ind won=40
total test's b/w pak and ind=56,pak won=12,ind won=8
all i can say is
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  #38  
Old August 11, 2007, 04:11 PM
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now when khan's and mohammad's XI completed
we will create a michael XI

1.MICHAEL vandort(sr)(9 tests)(ave=52)
Michael Vandort, a tall left hander, emerged onto the national scene in 2001 after a string of impressive performances for Colombo Cricket Club and Sri Lanka A. A late developer, Vandort played only one first-class match for St Joseph's First XI, but he quickly made an impression. He was then picked for a Board XI side against India in August 2001 and booked himself a berth in Sri Lanka's 16-man Test squad on the back of an impressive century. He sat on the sidelines throughout the series, but was finally given a chance against Bangladesh in 2001 when the selectors rested senior players. However, despite scoring a century in the second Test, he then waited three-and-half-years before reclaiming a place in the national squad. Opportunities were restricted due to the established Jayasuriya-Atapattu opening combination, but many argue he has nonetheless been unfairly ignored by the selectors. An injury to Sanath Jayasuriya paved the way for his ODI debut against Australia at Melbourne in February 2006. He top scored with a gritty but slow 48 but was then dropped for the rest of his series. He played two Tests in the Bangladesh series that followed, again showing an impressive adhesiveness and is particularly strong off the front foot, through the off-side and leg-side. Rated highly as a slip fieldsman but is slow in the field, a weakness that continues to restrict his opportunities in the limited-overs game

2.MICHAEL slater(aus)(74 test)(ave=42)
A combative and wholehearted cricketer, Michael Slater has played many vital innings for New South Wales and as an Australia opener with his adventurous brand of strokeplay.
A product of Wagga Wagga, his was a meteoric rise. Following a stint at the Australian Cricket Academy, he made rapid strides, turning a place in the New South Wales Second XI at the start of the 1992-93 season into a berth in Australia's 1993 Ashes squad by the end of that summer. After notching a half-century in the opening match of that series - alongside fellow New South Welshman, Mark Taylor - and complementing it with a brilliant century in the following encounter at Lord's, he soon became a regular in his nation's Test team.
Aside from the period between October 1996 and March 1998, Slater occupied a position at the top of the Australian Test batting line-up for close to a decade. Amid a golden run of success for the team as a whole, individual highlights have included his 219 against Sri Lanka in Perth in 1995-96; and his brilliant home series against New Zealand in 1993-94 (which netted him 305 runs at 76.25) and England (623 runs at 62.30) in 1994-95. His signature trait of kissing his helmet whenever he reached three figures was seen 14 times, and he made scores in the nineties on a record-breaking nine occasions. He also played in each of the 16 matches between late 1999 and early 2001 which delivered the then Australian team the greatest run of consecutive victories in the history of Test cricket.
Ironically, Slater's aggressive approach didn't translated to similar results in one-day cricket. He produced a spectacular 73 on his one-day international debut but did not reach such heights again and did not played in an international limited-overs match after 1997.
After a prolonged form slump, Slater was dropped from the Australian Test side in August 2001 for the fifth Ashes Test. The following Australian summer - and under intense media scrutiny of both his professional and personal life - Slater then struggled to maintain a place in the New South Wales side. He continued to plug away, but as his career as a commentator took off, so his form with the bat, and appetite for the game, declined. He suffered a debilitating illness during the 2003-04 summer and announced his retirement in June 2004.

3.MICHAEL vaghun(C)(eng)(69 tests)(ave=44)
On September 12, 2005, Michael Vaughan secured his place in English sporting history by becoming the first captain to win an Ashes series since Mike Gatting in 1986-87. It was the culmination of a five-year journey for Vaughan, whose captaincy - calm, obdurate and ruthlessly effective - had become as classy and composed as the batting technique that, briefly, carried him to the top of the world rankings. With a priceless ability to treat triumph and disaster just the same, Vaughan faced up to his first ball in Test cricket with England four wickets down for two runs on a damp flyer at Johannesburg in 1999-2000, and drew immediate comparisons with Michael Atherton for his inhumanly calm aura at the crease. But, despite the obvious similarities between the two - from their Mancunian heritage to their indifference to sledging - Vaughan soon demonstrated he was more than just a like-for-like replacement. Once he had made the place his own, Vaughan blossomed magnificently, playing with a freedom of expression that Atherton had never dared to approach. He sparkled his way to 900 runs in seven Tests against Sri Lanka and India in 2002, the prelude to a formidable series in Australia in which he became the first visiting batsman for 32 years to top 600 runs. Despite the fact that his one-day record at the time scarcely matched up to his impressive Test figures, he was appointed captain of England's one-day side in time for the 2003 home season, and inherited the Test captaincy two weeks later when Nasser Hussain abdicated out of the blue. Hussain, astutely, had spotted Vaughan's burgeoning man-management abilities, and despite a torrid baptism, including a record-breaking defeat at Lord's, Vaughan guided his team to a 2-2 draw. After a stutter in Sri Lanka, he confirmed the arrival of a new era by routing West Indies on their home soil, the first time in three decades an England team had achieved such a feat. Returning home, he won seven out of seven Tests by whitewashing first New Zealand (3-0) then West Indies (4-0), went on to record a memorable 2-1 series win in South Africa, and then achieved Nirvana with a 2-1 triumph in arguably the greatest series of all time. But then came a terrible hiatus. A recurrence of an old knee injury meant that Marcus Trescothick stood in for the first Test of the post-Ashes era, in Pakistan, and the seriousness of the issue really became clear three months later in India, when he was forced home for a series of operations that wrecked his 2006 season and ensured that he would not be fit to lead England's return trip to Australia. Andrew Flintoff took over the captaincy, but the calls for Vaughan's return grew louder as England were bundled ever closer to their eventual 5-0 whitewash. Vaughan was duly recalled, as captain, for the one-day series and retained for the World Cup in spite of a debiliating hamstring strain that reduced him to just three appearances out of ten in a victorious CB Series campaign. He limped his way through the World Cup, in every sense of the word, becoming an increasing liability in the top order. Two months later he quit the limited-overs captaincy, but by then he had re-established himself at the helm of the Test side. He scored a memorable century on home turf at Headingley in his comeback game, before going on to overhaul Peter May's record of 20 wins as England captain.

4.MICHAEL beven(aus)(232 odi's)(ave=53)
Regularly dubbed the world's best limited-overs batsman, Michael Bevan continued his prolific ways when his international career closed at the end of the 2003-04 season. An essential part of the one-day outfit for a decade, especially when orchestrating calm chases in crises that often ended in last-over or last-ball heroics, he was cut from the contract list with two World Cup wins and kitbags full of highlights. He will long be remembered for his pair of sensational innings against West Indies at Sydney in 1996 and New Zealand at Melbourne in 2002, when nerveless batting and juggling of the tail secured nail-biting victories. Picking the gaps, running hard and knowing the right moment - and place - to hit a boundary were the hallmarks of his success. He was also a fine fieldsman and his left-arm wrist spin, which swung from erratic to more than useful, added to his lure and allowed him to play Tests as a batting allrounder.
Bevan enjoyed a promising start to his Test career with 82 in his debut innings and another two half-centuries in his first series against Pakistan in 1994-95, but he managed only a stop-start four-year campaign and was hindered by an inability to play the short ball at the highest level, which was strange as he had few problems with it in Australian or English domestic cricket. He never made a century, although he was twice unbeaten in the 80s when batting down the order and running out of partners against West Indies, who he upset with 15 wickets in the 1997-98 series. After that his Test career slid, but while he lost his baggy green he worked on making unforgettable memories in the green and gold one-day uniform, finishing with 232 appearances and a phenomenal average of 53.58 that was boosted by six centuries, 46 fifties and 67 not outs.
Born in Canberra, Bevan made his first-class debut in 1989-90 in South Australian colours, hitting a thrilling century in his first innings, before the completion of a 12-month stint at the Academy led to a move back to New South Wales. It was in Sydney that he began to make his greatest strides as a player, quickly assuming a regular middle-order berth in the strongest state team in the country and, aside from a poor run in 1992-93 which resulted in a brief omission, using it as a launching pad to the national team. Shortly after being cut by the Australian selectors - Trevor Hohns said his "contribution to the one-day side had decreased" - he signed a two-year deal with Tasmania and proved his days of domination were not finished when he struck a domestic record 1464 runs in the Pura Cup, including eight centuries. He was named the Pura Cup Player of the Year and his Bradmanesque scoring achieved an average of 97.60, but there was no return to the international arena and no sign of him being included for the 2007 World Cup. After a disrupted summer following a knee operation, he made brief appearances for Tasmania in 2005-06 and 2006-07. However, his body was struggling - he also suffered hip and heel problems in his last three years - and he retired in January 2007.

5.MICHAEL clark(aus)(27 tests)(ave=42)
Michael Clarke came of age in 2006-07, showing he could marry a mature approach with a lifetime desire to entertain. At the start of the home summer Clarke was not meant to be in the Test squad; by the end of it he was a senior player who had regained the Ashes and won his first World Cup. A tattoo scrawled on his left arm the previous winter reminded him to seize the day and he strengthened his grip from the moment Shane Watson's torn hamstring allowed his re-entry.
The flamboyant edges were usually curbed and the tinkered outlook brought him 389 Ashes runs at 77.80. A century at Adelaide secured his spot, a follow-up hundred in Perth confirmed his future, and by the end of the summer he was named vice-captain of the one-day side, although a hip problem ruined his immediate leadership aspirations in New Zealand. Recovering for the World Cup, he slotted in at No. 4 and finished tenth on the tournament's run-scoring list with 436 at 87.20, a haul enhanced by the limited batting time allowed by Hayden, Gilchrist and Ponting. In 2011 Clarke could be in charge of the push for a fourth consecutive trophy.
He already boasts a possibly unique claim to fame in Australian cricketing folklore: he was anointed as his country's next captain before he'd played a single Test. When he made his debut and a thrilling 151 against India at Bangalore his future looked even brighter than the yellow motorbike he received as the Man of the Match. The amazing ride continued with another stunning century on his home welcome at the Gabba, and his first Test season ended with the Allan Border Medal. Then came the fall.
Barely a year after his debut he was scuffing his feet around Hobart's Bellerive Oval while receiving a call from Trevor Hohns that ended his starburst at 20 Tests. A streak of 531 runs without a century through series against Pakistan, New Zealand, England, the World XI and West Indies led to his demotion and a desire "to tighten his technique", especially in the early stages against the swinging ball. An unbeaten 201 for New South Wales in the Pura Cup was a brave and swift response, but while he remained a one-day fixture, he had to wait until the low-key series against Bangladesh to reclaim his Test place. Three muted innings forced him and his supporters to wait for the Ashes.
Until his sacking in 2005 Clarke was a ravishing shotmaker with an unshakeable temperament. He did not so much take guard as take off. His arrival was typically the cue for a string of wristy, audacious flashes through the off side. All the while he radiated a pointy-elbowed elegance reminiscent of a young Greg Chappell or Mark Waugh, who, like Clarke, waited long and uncomplainingly for a Test opening and then marked the occasion with a century. Unlike Chappell and Waugh, who learned the ropes in domestic and county cricket, Clarke cut his teeth in Australia's one-day side. His impact in pyjamas was startling: he racked up 208 runs in four games before he was finally dismissed, and after 112 matches averaged in the mid-40s at a strike-rate hovering in the 80s. His bouncy fielding and searing run-outs, usually from square of the wicket, add to his value, while his left-arm tweakers cajole important breakthroughs, including six surprised Indians in the second innings of his fourth Test at Mumbai.
A cricket nut since he was in nappies, Clarke honed his technique against the bowling machine at his dad's indoor centre. Affably down-to-earth, he is meticulous about his hair - it is blond and always looks freshly showered - and adores fast cars. He is proudly patriotic too, wearing an Australian flag on the back of his bat in his early internationals, and before he played a Test he signed a record-breaking A$1.25m deal with Dunlop-Slazenger. A future star soon transformed into a genuine one, but it was not until the 2006-07 Ashes that he proved he was ready for the extra levels of responsibility.

6.MICHAEL hussey(aus)(16 tests)(ave=80)
England supporters can't understand why Australia took so long to recognise Michael Hussey's Test claims. Bradmanesque in county cricket, Hussey was a less prolific and sturdier model in Australia and seemed likely to remain an unfulfilled international until the Langer-Hayden-Ponting triumvirate cracked after four years. A fractured rib to Justin Langer gave Hussey his break following 15,313 first-class runs, a record for an Australian before wearing baggy green, and during a barely believable Test introduction he accepted the apt nickname of Mr Cricket. He also owns the mark for the fastest player to 1000 Test runs after taking only 166 days to rub out the achievement of England's Andrew Strauss.
After 11 years of first-class service his opening morning on the Test scene was a disappointment, ending with an extravagant attempted pull and a single, but he relaxed for his second match and made a deserving and attractive century. Three more hundreds followed in his first summer, including a memorable 122 in the second Test against South Africa when he put on 107 for the last wicket with Glenn McGrath. Aware of the dangers of the second-season blues, he erased any symptoms during a strong Ashes campaign that started with four consecutive fifties and was followed by a sweaty WACA century. After 16 Tests his mean of 79.85 was only a few rungs below Sir Don's and he is trying not to fall from greatness.
The one-day campaign was less productive and by the end of the World Cup he had been through his first glitch in an extraordinary international career. His calm outlook, strong team qualities and ability to perform in most situations had helped earn him the captaincy for the Chappell-Hadlee Series, but it quickly became a tournament to forget with three severe losses. At the World Cup his first four entries were single figures and he was not required to bat in either of the finals, finishing with 87 runs for the tournament. It was a rare ineffective period for such a focussed athlete.
Like Langer and Graeme Wood, his predecessors as left-handed Western Australian openers, Hussey is scrupulous at practice and has a tidy, compact style. Skilled off front foot and back, he is attractive to watch once set, which occurred regularly at Northamptonshire, Gloucestershire and Durham, where he set about rewriting century-old record-books. Only the third man after Wally Hammond and Graeme Hick to amass three Championship triple-hundreds, he averaged 79 in the 2001 winter, 72 in 2002, 89 in 2003, 36 in 2004 and 76 in 2005. All the while he maintained an equally consistent but less enviable Pura Cup mark - 30 in 2000-01, 35 in 2001-02, 34 in 2002-03, 41 in 2003-04 and 55 in 2004-05. Reinventing himself in one-day cricket as an agile fieldsman and innovative middle-order bat with cool head and loose wrists, Hussey underlined his credentials when picked in the limited-overs squad to tour New Zealand in 2005, and achieved more outrageous figures when it took 29 matches for his average to drop below 100. His sky-high standards slipped slightly in 2006-07, but he remains a central and versatile figure.

7.MICHAEL papps(Wk)(NZ)(6 tests)(ave=20)
After a successful junior career Michael Papps - an shortish, unflashy opener with an enviable ability to work the bowlers around and convert length balls into half-volleys - was selected to play against South Africa at home in 2003-04, after a prolific home season that brought him well over 1000 runs in all matches, in another attempt to solve New Zealand's long-running search for a capable opening batsman to partner Stephen Fleming. He impressed in the one-dayers, and was duly selected for the corresponding Test series. He made 59 on his debut, but struggled afterwards. Nevertheless, the selectors kept faith, and picked him to tour England in 2004. An injury to Craig McMillan handed him a spot in the second Test at Headingley. He scored a battling 86, opening in difficult conditions, but at some price: he broke a finger, and was forced to bat down the order in the second innings as New Zealand sunk to a series defeat. After a couple of injury-marred seasons - there was a broken finger, a dislocated shoulder, and a bang on the head from Brett Lee - he was recalled for the South African tour early in 2006. He failed to pass 22 in four attempts in the Tests, but kept his name in the selectors' minds with a stellar domestic season in 2006-07, racking up 1005 runs at 91.36, nearly 250 more than anyone else. He can also keep wicket, adding some flexibility to the squad.

8.MICHAEL holding(WI)(60 tests)(ave=23.5)
It began intimidatingly far away. He turned, and began the most elegant long-striding run of them all, feet kissing the turf silently, his head turning gently and ever so slightly from side to side, rhythmically, like that of a cobra hypnotising its prey. Good batsmen tended not to watch him all the way lest they became mesmerised. To the umpires he was malevolent stealth personified so they christened him Whispering Death. No-one in the game has bowled faster. His over to Geoff Boycott in the cauldron of Kensington Oval early in 1981 has gone down in history as the finest, fastest, most ferocious gambit of all time. Five years earlier, towards the end of the drought-ridden summer of 1976, The Oval had become a wasteland, parched beyond recognition, with slow flat heart-breaking pitches, and it was on this, in the final Test of the season, through the simple device of bowling ramrod-straight at high pace and to a full length, that he conjured 14 wickets for 149, the finest match figures ever by a West Indian. Now in the commentary box, he is gentle but fearless, a rational critic who beguiles with his deep fruity measured Jamaican twang.

9.MICHAEL melle(SA)(7 tests)(ave=32)
Michael Melle was a quick right-arm bowler who took 5 for 113 on his debut against Australia at Johannesburg in 1949-50. He toured England in 1951, taking 50 wickets but was restricted after undergoing an operation during the series. He played only one Test that summer, taking 4 for 9 at The Oval. In Australia and New Zealand in 1952-53 he took another 14 Test wickets, and at Launceston took a career-best 9 for 22.

10.MICHAEL kasprowicz(aus)(38 tests)(ave=33)
Michael Kasprowicz seems to have been smiling appeals forever. As a 17-year-old he studied Western Australia's top order on Queensland debut in 1989-90 while his schoolmates were sitting final exams, and continued to pop up in unexpected places. Like India. A swing bowler who learned to weave outswingers on Gabba greentops, Kasprowicz matured into a subcontinental specialist with reverse-swing, heavy cut and a this-isn't-too-hot-for-another-over attitude. He bravely carried an injury-hit attack struck by Navjot Sidhu and Sachin Tendulkar in 1997-98, popped back in 2001 and returned in 2004 to help end India's 35-year hold. After three years mostly spent refining his efficient yet aggressive action with Queensland and Glamorgan, Kasprowicz celebrated his fifth recall in 2004 with 13 matches, his longest Test run. During the wildly successful year the prongs of McGrath, Gillespie and Kasprowicz were so sharp that Brett Lee ran their refreshments.
To call Kasprowicz a workhorse is unflattering even though the description matches his stamina and size - he was an Australian Schoolboys rugby forward. Regularly clocked faster than his new-ball counterparts (excluding Lee) from a shorter run, Kasprowicz's angle and dart-perfect line caused constant headaches for international left-handers in the style of Paul Reiffel, another under-rated third wheel. He became an important clean-up or go-to man and only four times in 2004 did he leave an innings without a wicket as he collected 47 victims. An intimidating and muscular presence at county and state level - he often broke bones in England and peer pressure from Pura Cup batsmen hurried his Test and one-day returns - Kasprowicz became Queensland's leading wicket-taker in 2003-04, but after missing most of 2006-07 he has a battle to stay ahead of his best man Andy Bichel. Back and groin problems, which started in South Africa and were irritated by the pre-Ashes boot camp, limited him to a season of eight deliveries for Queensland and he lost his Cricket Australia deal.
Popular and cheerful off the field, `Kasper' has experienced the lows of being 12th man for Queensland's first Sheffield Shield win in 1994-95, waiting five months and three Tests for his first wicket and completing a regular do-si-do for a national place with Bichel. However, his greatest miss came during the 2005 Ashes series when his courageous 59-run partnership with Brett Lee at Edgbaston ended three short of victory. After adding 20 he gloved a contentious catch behind and England levelled the series 1-1. Returning from that tour on the outer, he responded with 44 Pura Cup wickets for the Bulls and was recalled for the trip to South Africa, where he and Lee reversed their Birmingham nightmare with a 19-run stand that earned a nail-biting two-wicket victory.

11.MICHAEL mason(NZ)(19 odi's)(ave=36.5)
Michael Mason earned his place in the New Zealand side the old fashioned way - by sheer hard work. Mason hails from Mangatainoka, not one of the more prolific development centres of New Zealand cricket, but he brings long valued work ethics associated with many country bowlers before him, including Ewen Chatfield, Harry Cave, Richard Collinge and Lance Cairns to name but a few. Like them, Mason is a solid and reliable performer; a workhorse to whom no task is too great. Mason has been dogged by injuries, but has kept lining up for more, and selection has been his reward. Making the next step is a well-timed challenge in his career. He was once described by John Bracewell as "the best line-and-length bowler in the country" and when he finally strung a few ODIs together, against Sri Lanka in 2006-07, he showed glimpses of that skill. His 4 for 24 in a Man-of-the-Match performance at Christchurch was the highlight and despite managing only one game in the tri-series in Australia, Mason was chosen in the 15-man World Cup squad.
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  #39  
Old August 12, 2007, 10:12 AM
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mod please change the thread name into
SAME NAME XI'S
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Old August 12, 2007, 06:45 PM
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no need to change the thread name.
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Old August 15, 2007, 11:31 PM
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Van " BD beater" Dort instead of Atherton? Bizarre to say the least bro ...
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Old September 1, 2007, 07:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sohel NR
Van " BD beater" Dort instead of Atherton? Bizarre to say the least bro ...
perhaps it's possible that atherton was a little too predictable
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