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  #276  
Old March 19, 2010, 09:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blah

Currently reading: "Brave New World" by Aldous Huxley

Good to know you finally catching up to the big high school boys in your higher education endeavor.
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  #277  
Old March 19, 2010, 10:31 PM
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Last 5 books
Deception point by Dan Brown. gets 10/10. Amazing story with perfect details. Typical Brown stuff

Tom Clancy's Op-Centre
by Steve Pieczenik. Crap novel, seriously. Gets 3/10. Dissapointed.

Shockwave by Clive Cussler. Gets 9/10. Good story. A bit unrealistic. Good use of vocabulary though.

Stones by William E. Bell. Gets 7/10. Decent, but not really my type. The beginning chapters are funny though

Stormbreaker by Anthony Horowitz. Gets 8/10. Missed the movie. The novel was pretty good, even though short. Gotta check out the movie now.
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  #278  
Old March 19, 2010, 10:48 PM
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Dracula by Bram Stoker, love it!
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  #279  
Old April 11, 2010, 07:55 PM
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What better way to get your post-Sherlock Holmes fix? This!

Just started reading it...

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  #280  
Old September 5, 2011, 08:44 PM
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^Never finished it.

Recommend:



Holler @ Sohel da, Asif da.... and other hockey fans. They talk about Gretzky having a mental model of games having a database like chess players where he forms complex patterns on autopilot to go where the puck will go and not where it was.....

On the same theme as Gladwell's Outlier et al.
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  #281  
Old September 5, 2011, 11:22 PM
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I wish I had the patience to finish a book The only things I read are the readings assigned by my profs.

Are there any ways I can become a reader like everyone here? Any strategies? anything will do! Someone wanna recommend a good book that will keep my attention?

OHOH please no twilight/vampire stuff...its not my thing.
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  #282  
Old September 5, 2011, 11:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FaHiMa
I wish I had the patience to finish a book The only things I read are the readings assigned by my profs.

Are there any ways I can become a reader like everyone here? Any strategies? anything will do! Someone wanna recommend a good book that will keep my attention?

OHOH please no twilight/vampire stuff...its not my thing.
I am at the same boat sister. When I was a kid reading was FUN. Now it became chore and school assignment. Also, just because of sheer amount of books and online information overload it's hard to choose a good book and spend hours on it instead of just spending glued online and browsing pdfs.

Depends if you want to read for pleasure or to glean information. For latter, sit with feet grounded not on toes. Get a red bull or if you are underage vodka or jaeger. Then read fast. Of course this is rather vague but as the 'speedreaders' recommend, don't reread. Your brain is lot smarter than the respect you give it.

Another "trick" is not to get 'too attached'. If you have several copies of old book take a book and tear a page and read it quickly and throw it away in waste basket.

In short, it all depends whether what is your goal. As one guy mentioned once, you can't fly a Boeing 747 to your local supermarket. It's not worth it. So if you want idyllic time just read at your own pace.
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  #283  
Old September 12, 2011, 04:58 PM
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I've just (apprehensively) started Ulysses.
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  #284  
Old September 12, 2011, 05:01 PM
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I went through this thread and I have to echo the recommendations SohelNR and Electrequiem made, particularly Marquez and Murakami.

My recommendations:
For those who like crime/mafia fiction - The Day of the Owl (Il giorno della civetta) by Leonardo Sciascia
For those who like satires about War: Catch-22 by Joseph Heller, Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut, The Good Soldier Svejk by Jaroslav Hasek
For those who like magical realism: Along with the above mentioned books by Marquez and Rushdie, The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
For those who like short stories, which, for lack of a better word, warp your mind: Labyrinths by Jorge Luis Borges (You'll see how Inception was inspired by a few of these stories)
For those who like cultural history/social anthropology: The first two parts of the Ibis Trilogy (Sea of Poppies and River of Smoke) by Amitav Ghosh; In Xanadu and City of Djinns by William Darlymple
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  #285  
Old September 12, 2011, 05:18 PM
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Cat in a hat = Êpic Shizzle fam...
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  #286  
Old September 13, 2011, 02:16 AM
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I have been reading a few range of books as repeats:
Finished the kite runner, 1000 splendid suns and currently reading Harry potter and the deathly hallows.
Will read the da vinci code again.

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  #287  
Old September 13, 2011, 09:55 AM
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i am reading a book called something wonderful by judith mcnaught
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  #288  
Old September 13, 2011, 09:55 AM
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  #289  
Old February 3, 2012, 02:04 PM
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Just finished 'touching the void' by Joe Simpson. It's a thrilling book based on a true story where Joe and his friend Simon went to conquer Andes peak Silua Grande and they fall into deep trouble. It says how they survived. It's a story about courage, humanity and friendship.

More lined up for me, bought 'True colours: My Life' - Adam Gilchrist's autobiography which should be an amazing book. Looking forward to read that.
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  #290  
Old February 7, 2012, 02:04 AM
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Just finished reading Jodi Picoult's "the Pact"
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  #291  
Old May 8, 2012, 06:04 PM
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How many have you read?
Quote:
The one hundred most influential books, according to Seymour-Smith, in the approximate chronological order he gives:
# Author or source Title Date Public domain?
1 Chinese classic texts I Ching 11th century BCE yes
2 Jewish scripture Hebrew Bible 8th–4th century BCE yes
3 Homer Iliad and Odyssey 8th – early 7th century BCE yes
4 Hindu scripture Upanishads 9th[1] – 6th[1] century BC yes
5 Lao Tsu Tao Te Ching 4th century BCE yes
6 Zoroastrian scripture Avesta 1st millennium BC – 3rd century CE yes
7 Confucius Analects 5th–4th century BCE yes
8 Thucydides History of the Peloponnesian War 5th century BCE yes
9 Hippocrates Works 400 BC yes
10 Aristotle Works 4th century BCE yes
11 Herodotus Histories 5th century BCE yes
12 Plato The Republic 380 BCE yes
13 Euclid Elements 280 BCE yes
14 Theravada Buddhist scripture Dhammapada (Path of the Dharma) 252 BCE yes
15 Virgil Aeneid 19 BCE yes
16 Lucretius De Rerum Natura 55 BCE yes
17 Philo of Alexandria Allegorical Expositions of the Holy Laws 1st century CE yes
18 Christian scripture New Testament ca. 50–100 CE yes
19 Plutarch Parallel Lives 120 CE yes
20 Cornelius Tacitus Annals, From the Death of the Divine Augustus 120 CE yes
21 Valentinus Gospel of Truth (Gnostic text) 2nd century yes
22 Marcus Aurelius Meditations 167 yes
23 Sextus Empiricus Outlines of Pyrrhonism 150–210 CE yes
24 Plotinus Enneads 3rd century yes
25 Augustine of Hippo Confessions 400 CE yes
26 Muslim scripture Quran 7th century yes
27 Moses Maimonides Guide for the Perplexed 1190 yes
28 Text of Judaic mysticism Kabbalah 12th century yes
29 Thomas Aquinas Summa Theologiae 1266–1273 yes
30 Dante Alighieri The Divine Comedy 1321 yes
31 Desiderius Erasmus In Praise of Folly 1509 yes
32 Niccolò Machiavelli The Prince 1532 yes
33 Martin Luther On the Babylonian Captivity of the Church 1520 yes
34 François Rabelais Gargantua and Pantagruel 1532 and 1534 yes
35 John Calvin Institutes of the Christian Religion 1536 yes
36 Nicolaus Copernicus On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres 1543 yes
37 Michel de Montaigne Essays 1580 yes
38 Miguel de Cervantes Don Quixote 1605 and 1615 yes
39 Johannes Kepler Harmony of the Worlds 1619 yes
40 Francis Bacon Novum Organum 1620 yes
41 William Shakespeare First Folio 1623 yes
42 Galileo Galilei Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems 1632 yes
43 René Descartes Discourse on Method 1637 yes
44 Thomas Hobbes Leviathan 1651 yes
45 Gottfried Leibniz Works 1663–1716 yes
46 Blaise Pascal Pensées 1670 yes
47 Baruch de Spinoza Ethics 1677 yes
48 John Bunyan Pilgrim's Progress 1678–1684 yes
49 Isaac Newton Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy 1687 yes
50 John Locke Essay Concerning Human Understanding 1689 yes
51 George Berkeley Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge 1710, revised 1734 yes
52 Giambattista Vico The New Science 1725, revised 1744 yes
53 David Hume A Treatise of Human Nature 1739–1740 yes
54 Denis Diderot (ed.) Encyclopédie 1751–1772 yes
55 Samuel Johnson A Dictionary of the English Language 1755 yes
56 Voltaire Candide 1759 yes
57 Thomas Paine Common Sense 1776 yes
58 Adam Smith The Wealth of Nations 1776 yes
59 Edward Gibbon The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire 1776–1787 yes
60 Immanuel Kant Critique of Pure Reason 1781, revised 1787 yes
61 Jean-Jacques Rousseau Confessions 1781 yes
62 Edmund Burke Reflections on the Revolution in France 1790 yes
63 Mary Wollstonecraft A Vindication of the Rights of Woman 1792 yes
64 William Godwin An Enquiry Concerning Political Justice 1793 yes
65 Thomas Robert Malthus An Essay on the Principle of Population 1798, revised 1803 yes
66 George Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel Phenomenology of Spirit 1807 yes
67 Arthur Schopenhauer The World as Will and Idea 1819 yes
68 Auguste Comte The Course in Positive Philosophy 1830–1842 yes
69 Carl von Clausewitz On War 1832 yes
70 Søren Kierkegaard Either/Or 1843 yes
71 Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels Communist Manifesto 1848 yes
72 Henry David Thoreau Civil Disobedience 1849 yes
73 Charles Darwin The Origin of Species 1859 yes
74 John Stuart Mill On Liberty 1859 yes
75 Herbert Spencer First Principles 1862 yes
76 Gregor Mendel Experiments on Plant Hybridization 1866 yes
77 Leo Tolstoy War and Peace 1868–1869 yes
78 James Clerk Maxwell Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism 1873 yes
79 Friedrich Nietzsche Thus Spoke Zarathustra 1883–1885 yes
80 Sigmund Freud The Interpretation of Dreams 1900 yes
81 William James Pragmatism 1908 yes
82 Albert Einstein Relativity 1916 yes
83 Vilfredo Pareto The Mind and Society 1916 yes
84 Carl Jung Psychological Types 1921
85 Martin Buber I and Thou 1923
86 Franz Kafka The Trial 1925 yes
87 Karl Popper The Logic of Scientific Discovery 1934
88 John Maynard Keynes General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money 1936 yes
89 Jean-Paul Sartre Being and Nothingness 1943
90 Friedrich von Hayek The Road to Serfdom 1944
91 Simone de Beauvoir The Second Sex 1948
92 Norbert Wiener Cybernetics 1948, revised 1961
93 George Orwell Nineteen Eighty-Four 1949
94 George Gurdjieff Beelzebub's Tales to His Grandson 1950
95 Ludwig Wittgenstein Philosophical Investigations 1953
96 Noam Chomsky Syntactic Structures 1957
97 Thomas Kuhn The Structure of Scientific Revolutions 1962, revised 1970
98 Betty Friedan The Feminine Mystique 1963
99 Mao Zedong
(attributed)
Quotations from Chairman Mao Zedong (Little Red Book) 1966
100 B. F. Skinner Beyond Freedom and Dignity 1971
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_100...ten_%28book%29
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  #292  
Old May 8, 2012, 06:12 PM
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Good list but biased towards Western culture. I've only read 37. Looks like long way to go before I die.
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  #293  
Old May 8, 2012, 06:58 PM
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The one hundred most influential books, according to Seymour-Smith, in the approximate chronological order he gives:
# Author or source Title Date Public domain?
3 Homer Iliad and Odyssey 8th – early 7th century BCE
4 Hindu scripture Upanishads 9th[1] – 6th[1] century BC (not in its entirety)
7 Confucius Analects 5th–4th century BCE (when I lived in China, it was one of the few books that you could get in English along with the English classics!)
8 Thucydides History of the Peloponnesian War 5th century BCE
10 Aristotle Works 4th century BCE
11 Herodotus Histories 5th century BCE
12 Plato The Republic 380 BCE
13 Euclid Elements 280 BCE yes
15 Virgil Aeneid 19 BCE
18 Christian scripture New Testament ca. 50–100 CE
25 Augustine of Hippo Confessions 400 CE (law class)
26 Muslim scripture Quran 7th century
27 Moses Maimonides (never really read anything by him but know about him as I visited a museum which had information about him, his work and his life. Also, visited a house he was supposed to have lived in, in Fez, Morocco)
29 Thomas Aquinas Summa Theologiae 1266–1273 (Bits and pieces as part of land law and legal theory funnily enough - along with some St. Augustine)
32 Niccolò Machiavelli The Prince 1532
38 Miguel de Cervantes Don Quixote 1605 and 1615
41 William Shakespeare First Folio 1623
44 Thomas Hobbes Leviathan 1651
50 John Locke Essay Concerning Human Understanding 1689
52 Giambattista Vico The New Science 1725, revised 1744
55 Samuel Johnson A Dictionary of the English Language 1755 (Been to his house too!)
56 Voltaire Candide 1759
57 Thomas Paine Common Sense 1776
58 Adam Smith The Wealth of Nations 1776
60 Immanuel Kant Critique of Pure Reason 1781, revised 1787
61 Jean-Jacques Rousseau Confessions 1781 (And his Social Contract)
62 Edmund Burke Reflections on the Revolution in France 1790 (and other essays and speeches by him)
65 Thomas Robert Malthus An Essay on the Principle of Population 1798, revised 180
66 George Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (Read Hegel, but not this particular text)
71 Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels Communist Manifesto 1848
73 Charles Darwin The Origin of Species 1859
74 John Stuart Mill On Liberty 1859 yes
76 Gregor Mendel Experiments on Plant Hybridization 1866
79 Friedrich Nietzsche Thus Spoke Zarathustra 1883–1885
80 Sigmund Freud The Interpretation of Dreams 1900
86 Franz Kafka The Trial 1925 (Metamorphosis and Other Short stories as well)
88 John Maynard Keynes
89 Jean-Paul Sartre
90 Friedrich von Hayek (Read other books and articles by the above three but not the specific texts)
93 George Orwell Nineteen Eighty-Four 1949
95 Ludwig Wittgenstein Philosophical Investigations 1953
99 Mao Zedong (attributed) Quotations from Chairman Mao Zedong (Little Red Book) 1966

Surprised that St. Thomas More's Utopia or Ovid's Metamorphoses (greatly influenced Marlowe and Shakespeare) or Mein Kampf didn't make it to this list. Nothing by Bertrand Russell either - funny considering Wittgenstein was his protege!
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  #294  
Old May 8, 2012, 07:06 PM
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Zee, from your posts I can surmise that you have an interest in religions, both ancient and modern, as well as the esoteric but are you also interested in political science?

Boss, if you want to catch up on this list, I would suggest collecting books from Penguin's 'Great Ideas' series :p - http://www.penguin.co.uk/static/cs/u...s/index_1.html

Also, I agree that there is a great western bias in this list. The Penguin books aren't much better but they do have books by Sun Tzu (The Art of War is another jarring omission from the above list), Tagore, Chinua Achebe etc. I'm surprised that all these lists miss out on some Chinese epics such as Journey to the West which has influenced the childhoods of hundreds of millions of Chinese kids (and East Asians)
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  #295  
Old May 9, 2012, 12:28 AM
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The Lhasa Chronicles by my uncle Akhter Matin Chaudhury. The books a travelogue about his trip to Tibet, a boyhood dream coming true and is loads of fun. Here's a couple of excerpts from the bio:

Quote:
He was always keen on adventure but was severely restrained in his quest by a combination of lack of opportunity, parental control and spousal dominance. Being brought up in an environment that held conservative values where the pursuit of learning was considered to be the only worthwhile occupation, encouragement to risk life and limb in the seemingly aimless pursuit of fun was notably absent. Once free of the shackles and with a long leash grudgingly granted by an exasperated spouse, the author was at last able to indulge his adventure for passion in 2011. He not only made the momentous journey to Tibet but also braved chronicling it, the most thrilling adventure of his life. His earlier writings have been limited to prosaic offerings on technical subjects and some attempts at humor in short pieces mostly about airplane journeys.

When not an intrepid explorer, Akhter Matin Chaudhury leads a mundane life in the vulgar world of commerce which provides him with the means to keep a roof over his head and put food on the table for his family. Although he has a background in accounting, he is currently more involved in the innocuous field of general management. He laments the circumstances that forced him into the cut and dried world of number crunching and diverted him from his true vocation in life, that of the creative arts.
He's 60 and the Chairman & CEO of Nuvista Pharmaceuticals in Bangladesh.
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Last edited by Sohel; May 26, 2012 at 01:18 AM..
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  #296  
Old May 25, 2012, 11:55 PM
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One of my favourite short stories ... ...

When Mr. Pirzada Came to Dine
- Jhumpa Lahiri (From Interpreter of Maladies)

IN THE AUTUMN OF 1971 a man used to come to our house, bearing confections in his pocket and hopes of ascertaining the life or death of his family. His name was Mr. Pirzada, and he came from Dacca, now the capital of Bangladesh, but then a part of Pakistan. That year Pakistan was engaged in civil war. The eastern frontier, where Dacca was located, was fighting for autonomy from the ruling regime in the west. In March, Dacca had been invaded, torched and shelled by the Pakistani army. Teachers were dragged onto streets and shot, women dragged into barracks and raped. By the end of the summer, three hundred thousand people were said to have died. In Dacca Mr. Pirzada had a three-story home, a lectureship in botany at the university, a wife of twenty year, and seven daughters between the ages of six and sixteen whose names all began with the letter A. “Their mother’s idea,” he explained one day, producing from his wallet a black-and-white picture of seven girls at a picnic, their braids tied with ribbons, sitting cross-legged in a row, eating chicken curry off of banana leaves. “How am I to distinguish? Ayesha, Amira, Amina, Aziza, you see the difficulty.”

Each week Mr. Pirzada wrote letters to his wife, and sent comic books to each of his seven daughters, but the postal system, along with most everything else in Dacca, had collapsed, and he had not heard word of them in over six months. Mr. Pirzada, meanwhile, was in America for the year, for he had been awarded a grant from the government of Pakistan to study the foliage of New England. In spring and summer he had gathered data in Vermont and Maine, and in autumn he moved to a university north of Boston, where we lived, to write a short book about his discoveries. The grant was a great honor, but when converted into dollars it was not generous. As a result, Mr. Pirzada lived in a room in a graduate dormitory, and did not own a proper stove or a television set of his own. And so he came to our house to eat dinner and watch the evening news.

Full read - need to download pdf copy - Link
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  #297  
Old May 26, 2012, 01:09 AM
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^Thank you so much Noc. It was deeply moving reading this again after 12 years or so. Jhumpa is only 6 days older than I am and I too have vivid memories of that time. I cannot help myself from crying when I read this for a lot of reasons.
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  #298  
Old July 14, 2012, 07:18 PM
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Has anyone read the book "Taliban cricket club"? I heard about it the other day and will be searching for it in book stores.
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  #299  
Old July 14, 2012, 07:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nocturnal
One of my favourite short stories ... ...

When Mr. Pirzada Came to Dine
- Jhumpa Lahiri (From Interpreter of Maladies)


Full read - need to download pdf copy - Link
I loved that story. I had to read it for my English exam last year. It was a very moving and sad story
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  #300  
Old July 15, 2012, 04:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Antora
Has anyone read the book "Taliban cricket club"? I heard about it the other day and will be searching for it in book stores.
Haven't read it but read a review on it the other day: http://www.espncricinfo.com/magazine...ry/568145.html

About Interpreter of Maladies - for some reason, I never really enjoyed it. Maybe it was because I was reading so much South Asian post-colonial literature at the time but I didn't find it to be particularly 'original'.

Bought 'Beyond a Boundary' a couple of weeks ago. Should start reading it soon - supposedly the best book ever written on cricket and perhaps sports overall!
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