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  #1  
Old August 26, 2007, 12:24 PM
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Cool The BC Jazz Lounge



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Overview

Jazz has roots in the combination of American music traditions, including spirituals, blues and ragtime, religious hymns, hillbilly music, and marching band music. After originating near the beginning of the 20th century, jazz styles spread in the 1920s, influencing other musical styles. The origins of the word jazz are uncertain. The word is rooted in American slang, and various derivations have been suggested. Jazz was not applied to jazz music until about 1915, in Chicago. Earl Hines, born in 1903 and later to become a celebrated "jazz" musician, used to claim that he was "playing piano before the word "Jazz" was even invented". For the origin and history of the word jazz, see Jazz (word).

The instruments used in marching bands and dance band music at the turn of century became the basic instruments of jazz: brass, reeds, and drums, using the Western 12-tone scale. Small bands of musicians played a seminal role in disseminating early jazz, traveling throughout communities in the West, South, and to northern cities.

The postbellum network of public schools, as well as civic societies and widening mainstream opportunities for education, produced more formally trained musicians. For example, Lorenzo Tio and Scott Joplin were schooled in classical European musical forms. Tio was a Creole who was born in Mexico. Joplin, the son of a former slave and a free-born black woman, was largely self-taught until age 11, when he received lessons in the fundamentals of music theory. Jazz is not a pure folk music, in that it more often derives from artists with formal music training and skills.

Improvisation

While jazz may be difficult to define, improvisation is clearly one of its key elements. Improvisation has been an essential element in African-American music since early forms of the music developed.

Improvisation styles have changed over time. Early folk blues music often was based around a call and response pattern, and improvisation would factor in the lyrics, the melody, or both. In Dixieland jazz, musicians take turns playing the melody while the others improvise countermelodies. In contrast to other musical styles (e.g. classical music), where performers try to play the piece exactly as the author envisioned it, the goal in jazz is often to create a new interpretation, changing the melody, harmonies, even the time signature. If classical music is the composer's medium, jazz places equal emphasis on the performer, 'adroitly weigh[ing] the respective claims of the composer and the improviser'.

By the Swing era, big bands played using arranged music: arrangements were either written or rehearsed (many early jazz musicians could not read written music.) Individual soloists, however, would perform improvised solos within these compositions. In bebop the focus shifted from the arrangement to improvisation over the form; musicians paid less attention to the composed melody, or "head," which was played at the beginning and the end of the tune's performance with improvised sections in between.

Later styles of jazz such as modal jazz abandoned the strict notion of a chord progression, allowing the individual musicians to improvise more freely within the context of a given scale or mode (e.g., So What on the Miles Davis album Kind of Blue). The avant-garde and free jazz idioms permit, even call for, abandoning chords, scales, and rhythmic meters.

When a pianist, guitarist or other chord-playing instrumentalist improvises an accompaniment while a soloist is playing, it is called comping (a contraction of the word "accompanying"). "Vamping" is a mode of comping that is usually restricted to a few repeating chords or bars, as opposed to comping on the chord structure of the entire composition. Most often, vamping is used as a simple way to extend the very beginning or end of a piece, or to set up a segue. In some modern jazz compositions where the underlying chords of the composition are particularly complex or fast moving, the composer or performer may create a set of "blowing changes," which is a simplified set of chords better suited for comping and solo improvisation.

Debates over definition of "jazz"

As the term "jazz" has long been used for a wide variety of styles, a comprehensive definition including all varieties is elusive. While some enthusiasts of certain types of jazz have argued for narrower definitions which exclude many other types of music also commonly known as jazz, jazz musicians themselves are often reluctant to define the music they play. Duke Ellington summed it up by saying, "It's all music." Some critics have even stated that Ellington's music was not in fact jazz, as by its very definition, according to them, jazz cannot be orchestrated. On the other hand Ellington's friend Earl Hines's 20 solo "transformative versions" of Ellington compositions (on "Earl Hines Plays Duke Ellington" recorded in the 1970s) were described by Ben Ratliff, the "New York Times" jazz critic, as "as good an example of the jazz process as anything out there".

There have long been debates in the jazz community over the boundaries or definition of “jazz.” In the mid-1930s, New Orleans jazz lovers criticized the "innovations" of the swing era as being contrary to the collective improvisation they saw as essential to "true" jazz. From the 1940s and 1960s, traditional jazz enthusiasts and Hard Bop criticized each other, often arguing that the other style was somehow not "real" jazz. Although alteration or transformation of jazz by new influences has been initially criticized as “radical” or a “debasement,” Andrew Gilbert argues that jazz has the “ability to absorb and transform influences” from diverse musical styles.

Commercially-oriented or popular music-influenced forms of jazz have long been criticized. Traditional jazz enthusiasts have dismissed the 1970s jazz fusion era as a period of commercial debasement. However, according to Bruce Johnson, jazz music has always had a "tension between jazz as a commercial music and an art form".

Gilbert notes that as the notion of a canon of traditional jazz is developing, the “achievements of the past” may be become "...privileged over the idiosyncratic creativity...” and innovation of current artists. Village Voice jazz critic Gary Giddins argues that as the creation and dissemination of jazz is becoming increasingly institutionalized and dominated by major entertainment firms, jazz is facing a "...perilous future of respectability and disinterested acceptance." David Ake warns that the creation of “norms” in jazz and the establishment of a “jazz tradition” may exclude or sideline other newer, avant-garde forms of jazz.

One way to get around the definitional problems is to define the term “jazz” more broadly. According to Krin Gabbard “jazz is a construct” or category that, while artificial, still is useful to designate “a number of musics with enough in common part of a coherent tradition”. Travis Jackson also defines jazz in a broader way by stating that it is music that includes qualities such as “ 'swinging', improvising, group interaction, developing an 'individual voice', and being 'open' to different musical possibilities”.

Where to draw the boundaries of "jazz" is the subject of debate among music critics, scholars, and fans. Music that is a mixture of jazz and pop music, such as the recent albums of Jamie Cullum, James Blunt and Joss Stone have been called "jazz" performers. Jazz festivals are increasingly programming a wide range of genres, including world beat music, folk, electronica, and hip-hop. This trend may lead to the perception that all of the performers at a festival are jazz artists – including artists from non-jazz genres.

Wikipedia link:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jazz#Overview
Jazz lovers old, new and curious, please post your Jazz-related videos and comments here, and let's enjoy this room. I start with the ones that have certainly brought me closer to Allah.
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  #2  
Old August 26, 2007, 12:28 PM
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Default Miles davis et John Coltrane - So what

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Old August 26, 2007, 12:29 PM
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Post Charles Mingus - Flowers For A Lady (1974)

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Old August 26, 2007, 12:30 PM
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Post John Coltrane - My Favourite Things

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Old August 26, 2007, 12:33 PM
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Default Thelonious Monk - Blue Monk

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Old August 26, 2007, 12:38 PM
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Post Miles Davis - Footprints

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Old August 26, 2007, 12:41 PM
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Default John McLaughlin and Shakti

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Old August 26, 2007, 12:43 PM
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Default John McLaughlin & Trilok Gurtu - Pasha's Love

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Old August 26, 2007, 12:47 PM
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Old August 26, 2007, 01:26 PM
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jazz is my main musical passion although the piano trio is what really inspires me. favousite pianists, in no particular order are bill evans, ahmad jamal, keith jarrett, kenny baron and brad mehldau.

depending on the mood i also dig oscar peterson, dave brubeck, egberto gismonti and errol garner.

i was spending too much money on jazz for the last six or seven years so have now stopped buying cds or going to ronnie scotts in london anymore! when my financial situation improves i hope to reignite that passion.

as for utube videos, well i am afraid i am also a passionate audiophile and can't listen to poor quality sound in most of the utuve videos. much prefer to buy the cd.
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Old August 27, 2007, 09:02 AM
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This thread reminds me of the visits that I made to New Orleans, Chicago and Kansas City.
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Old August 27, 2007, 12:55 PM
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i've seen winton marsalis play live..n met him.....he'sss maddd guddd
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Old August 27, 2007, 11:48 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigers_eye
This thread reminds me of the visits that I made to New Orleans, Chicago and Kansas City.
Definitely some of the top highlights of this life. Jazz is always best live.
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Old August 28, 2007, 03:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bangladesh_sy
i've seen winton marsalis play live..n met him.....he'sss maddd guddd
i saw him with the lincoln centre orchestra and part of the london symphony orchestra last year at st. david's hall. for a man who posseses such rare talent, i always wondered why he wraps himself up in such controversies as charting the purified black origin of jazz.

my other pet grudge is wondering why he's played within an orchestra exclusively since the late nineties? i've never seen him live as part of a small quartet, which if my ears are anything to go by is where he flourishes and that trumpet sound soars melodically above all his peers. in the sheer lyrical interpretation of a song, he had very few equals in his own instrument and a rare few within the entire history of jazz. perhaps bill evans, early ahmad jamal, early miles, chet baker, straight ahead stuff from clifford brown or lee morgan comes close. anyone who can make the trumpet sound so sweet should not be trying to deny the white european influence to jazz or think that jazz went bad after 1948. interestingly, a email acquaintence of mine through the newsgroup rec.muc.bluenote (the son of an ex-manager of his) always goes on about how brillint he was at emulating the bebop greats in the early eighties.
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Old August 28, 2007, 07:17 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Puck
i saw him with the lincoln centre orchestra and part of the london symphony orchestra last year at st. david's hall. for a man who posseses such rare talent, i always wondered why he wraps himself up in such controversies as charting the purified black origin of jazz.

my other pet grudge is wondering why he's played within an orchestra exclusively since the late nineties? i've never seen him live as part of a small quartet, which if my ears are anything to go by is where he flourishes and that trumpet sound soars melodically above all his peers. in the sheer lyrical interpretation of a song, he had very few equals in his own instrument and a rare few within the entire history of jazz. perhaps bill evans, early ahmad jamal, early miles, chet baker, straight ahead stuff from clifford brown or lee morgan comes close. anyone who can make the trumpet sound so sweet should not be trying to deny the white european influence to jazz or think that jazz went bad after 1948. interestingly, a email acquaintence of mine through the newsgroup rec.muc.bluenote (the son of an ex-manager of his) always goes on about how brillint he was at emulating the bebop greats in the early eighties.
yeaa..he came down to my high school here in Connecticuttt...causee..sum one that graduated frm my highschool donated sum big money to his jazz school..in NY i think..n..wynton Marsalis told himm..that he owe's him..soo the guy told wynton..to come down to ourr..school..n he didd..yeaa...he wass..rippinn..itt up there..with our jazz banndd.
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Old September 6, 2007, 11:03 AM
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Thumbs up Herbie Hancock and The Head Hunters ... the deepest funk

Chameleon, Part 1/2


Chameleon, Part 2/2
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