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  #1  
Old May 18, 2012, 05:35 AM
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Default Strange Medical conditions

Well might as well do something informative

Hypertrichosis
Hypertrichosis (also called Ambras Syndrome) is an abnormal amount of hair growth on the body;[1][2] extensive cases of hypertrichosis have informally been called werewolf syndrome.[3] There are two distinct types of hypertrichosis: generalized hypertrichosis, which occurs over the entire body, and localized hypertrichosis, which is restricted to a certain area.[1] Hypertrichosis can be either congenital (present at birth) or acquired later in life.[3][4] The excess growth of hair occurs in areas of the skin with the exception of androgen-dependent hair of the pubic area, face, and axillary regions.[5]

Several circus sideshow performers in the 19th and early 20th centuries, such as Julia Pastrana, had hypertrichosis.[6] Many of them worked as freaks and were promoted as having distinct human and animal traits
(From Wiki-if you're intereste read up more on it)
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  #2  
Old May 18, 2012, 06:37 AM
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Wow ! Interesting .
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  #3  
Old May 18, 2012, 08:10 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mar umpire
Well might as well do something informative
Not exactly the same but have you watched Anthony Hopkins starred 'The Elephant Man' movie ? That movie was based on a true story of a man who had severely deformed body structure. Very interesting movie, watch it if you haven't.
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Old May 18, 2012, 10:38 AM
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So interesting!
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  #5  
Old May 18, 2012, 07:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Naimul_Hd
Not exactly the same but have you watched Anthony Hopkins starred 'The Elephant Man' movie ? That movie was based on a true story of a man who had severely deformed body structure. Very interesting movie, watch it if you haven't.
No unfortunately I haven't but the disease "elephantiasis" as is commonly refrred to ( is cause by filiarisis-a worm that invades and disrupts the human lymphatic system)

Thanks for that here's the next one (i could use other sources like research articles etc but wiki's referenced for these)

Elephantiasis


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



Elephantiasis (/ˌɛlɨfənˈtaɪ.əsɨs/ EL-i-fən-TY-ə-sis) is a disease that is characterized by the thickening of the skin and underlying tissues, especially in the legs and male genitals. In some cases the disease can cause certain body parts, such as the scrotum, to swell to the size of a basketball.[1] It is caused by filariasis or podoconiosis.[2]

The proper medical term for the disease is elephantiasis.[3] It is commonly misheard as "Elephantitis", which substitutes for the ending -iasis (meaning process or resulting condition) the more commonly heard -itis (irritation or inflammation), resulting in "Elephantitis" meaning "inflammation of the elephant".



Elephantiasis occurs in the presence of microscopic, thread-like parasitic worms such as Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, and B. timori, all of which are transmitted by mosquitoes.[4] However, the disease itself is a result of a complex interplay between several factors: the worm, the symbiotic Wolbachia bacteria within the worm, the host’s immune response, and the numerous opportunistic infections and disorders that arise. Consequently, it is common in tropical regions and Africa. The adult worms only live in the human lymphatic system.[5] The parasite infects the lymph nodes and blocks the flow of lymph throughout the body; this results in chronic edema, most often noted in the lower torso (typically in the legs and genitals

NB-the lymphatic system is analogous almost to the venous system of the body-to put it simply stuff that leaks out of blod vessesls like arteries and veins goes back into the lymph vessels and circulates through back to the veins ultimately.

Lymph nodes can be felt as bumps that are places where white blood cells pick up foreign material and present these to other white blood cells where they can proliferate and ultimately fight the infections.

I know Deshimon was in Africa not so long ago-africa is a weird and wonderful place for medical conditions
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Old May 18, 2012, 07:33 PM
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@naimul_Hd I think this is the disease "the elephant man" was referring to
Proteus syndrome
COngnital-exists from birth or just prior to birth




From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Proteus syndrome, also known as Wiedemann syndrome (named after the German paediatrician Hans-Rudolf Wiedemann), is a congenital disorder[1]:554 that causes skin overgrowth and atypical bone development, often accompanied by tumors over half the body.[2]:776

Proteus syndrome is highly variable,[3] and is named after the Greek sea-god Proteus, who could change his shape.

The condition appears to have been first described in the American medical literature by Drs. Samia Temtamy and John Rogers in 1976[4][5] Dr. Michael Cohen described it in 1979,[6] only a few more than 200 cases have been confirmed worldwide, with estimates that about 120 people are currently alive with the condition.[7] As attenuated forms of the disease may exist, there could be many people with Proteus syndrome who remain undiagnosed. Those most readily diagnosed are also the most severely disfigured

May alllah protect us from these ailments
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Old May 18, 2012, 09:41 PM
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this is another thread that do not belong here.


mar umpire learn the management of diabetes instead of this crap. something that will be useful, though lymphedema is actually quiet common.
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Old May 18, 2012, 09:46 PM
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big fan of Oliver Sacks

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Man...Wife_for_a_Hat
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Old May 19, 2012, 12:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iDumb
this is another thread that do not belong here.


mar umpire learn the management of diabetes instead of this crap. something that will be useful, though lymphedema is actually quiet common.
iDUmb i've read the diabetes stuff, management etc and I'm quite sick of it lol. Especially in the western world, diabetes is epidemic.

But you're right that's stuff's more helpful. But i thought other people would be pretty interested, plus couldn't put up any pics of ulcers and that

Feel free to post any rare diseases that fascinate you

The weird and rare is always fascinating though-it's almost like the Indiana Jones or Dr Livingstone aspect of medicine
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Old May 19, 2012, 12:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeeshan
big fan of Oliver Sacks

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Man...Wife_for_a_Hat
Neuro and immnology right now are probably the biggest enigmas in med
Sacks has written a new book recently, haven't read it though
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Old May 19, 2012, 01:05 AM
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This thread is making me sad
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  #12  
Old May 19, 2012, 01:09 AM
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Sorry, it wasn't meant to be a sad thread or anything (shouldn't have used 'sorry", but how do I would apologise for that?)

It is unfortunate, but there's a lot we can learn as well from these regarding how we function

There are similar conditions in BD-but again these people aren't helped rather sometimes ridiculed or feared. That's the sad part I guess
I'll try and put in not so depressing illnesses
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Old May 19, 2012, 02:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mar umpire
iDUmb i've read the diabetes stuff, management etc and I'm quite sick of it lol.
OK how do u manage diabetes? teach us. This would actually be relevent for many of our members.
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  #14  
Old May 19, 2012, 02:43 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iDumb
OK how do u manage diabetes? teach us. This would actually be relevent for many of our members.
seconded
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Old May 19, 2012, 03:13 AM
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Since i have time to waste lets have fun.

Mar umpire, after you finish educating us on dm management, you will manage the following patient for me.

22 year old hot blonde female history of type 1 diabetes presents with severe abdominal pain x 5 hours.

Go.
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  #16  
Old May 19, 2012, 03:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iDumb
Since i have time to waste lets have fun.

Mar umpire, after you finish educating us on dm management, you will manage the following patient for me.

22 year old hot blonde female history of type 1 diabetes presents with severe abdominal pain x 5 hours.

Go.
Hah.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

And I am not even that kind of a doctor.
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  #17  
Old May 19, 2012, 03:26 AM
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Wrong, that was the answer I was expecting from mar umpire. I would have ripped him apart if he said that. Lucky for him you answered. Impressive from you being not in the field however
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  #18  
Old May 19, 2012, 03:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iDumb
Wrong, that was the answer I was expecting from mar umpire. I would have ripped him apart if he said that. Lucky for him you answered. Impressive from you being not in the field however
Why not that? I had also read of developing celiac disease. Is that also possible for Type 2?
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  #19  
Old May 19, 2012, 04:34 AM
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Regarding DM
Which one do you want, type 1 or 2 (your scenario is type 1 but 2 is what I would think most people from a bengali background would be interested in from a purely epidemioloical background)

According to Aus guidelines, diabetes is diagnosed via venous plasma glucose being 7 or more for fasting and 11.1 for 2hrs after meal/ OGTT. But again OGTT via a 75g glucose load is indicated in impaired fasting glucose.

Here they emphasise lifestyle modification as being the first line of treatment
Obviously it also depends on the individual patient regarding the action that's taken

By lifestyle measures the indications are treatment targets ,a healthy eating plan
an exercise program (involving preferably resistance i.e body resistance or weight training program), reduce cardiovascular risk factors (eg smoking, blood pressure (prefer 130/75, lipids).

The aim initally would be to lose at least 5-10% of one's body weight and maintain it
Meals and snacks should be low in saturated fat and based on low glycaemic index(but not fatty foods like potatoe chips, ice cream etc).Avoid sweetened drinks (eg coke, juice etc). watch out for preserved foods and drinks with fructose-fructose worsens insulin resistance and interfere with satiety mechanisms as can non-nutritive sweetners such as saccharine (insulin is believed to act in the region of the arcuate nucleus in the hypothalamus to mediate satiety).

But if you can't do weight training, a good place to start is by taking brisk 30 minute walks at least 5 times a week. But the exercise plan depends on your other conditions-if you have problems with your peripheral circulation you might consider a different exercise plan.

Diabetics should also regularly monitor their glucose (if on insulin monitor very closely preferable more than once a day) but again this will be catered according to the individual circumstances. But during illness and peridos of stress/strneous exercise the glucose should be measured.

You should review your progress every 3 months-regarding Blood pressure, glucose, lipids and waist+weight measurements. You might also get your foot examined . But every 6 months you'll want the foot examined and HbA1c seen (seen on a blood test). every year you'd want all the above plus your eye check for retinopathy as well as urine tests for microalbuminuria and plasma creatine/GFR (these are things done to check how your kidneys are going-diabetes stuffs the kidneys up)


Usually lifestyle measures are tried for 3 months-if no improvements or during this time worsening of symptoms start on drug therapy. Usually biguanide (metformin first up), but again check for renal function before that as lactic acidosis howevr rare is a potentially fatal side effect-this drug has GI side effects so watch out for that as well. After this traditionaly the sulfonylureas were used however now there is a push towards Dpp4 inhibitors like sitagliptin. Sitagli[ptin is preferred as it doesn't cause the massive hpos some sulfonylureas can i.e usually safer

If the combo of metformin and sufonylurea don't work add insulin on top of that-may initially reduce the sulfonylurea to prevent hypos and slowly titrate up if needed

Other aspects of management include-education in self-monitoring, adjusting treatment and how to cope with emergencies that affect the patient's blood glucose
screening for, and treatment of, complications of diabetes (like cardiovascular, renal, retniopathy and neuropathies)

Things to watch out for
Hypos-if you are getting hypoglycaemic attacks (sweaty, nauseous, "dizzy", blacking out) etc and you are getting them frequently eg on a monthly basis-consult your doctor quickly as repeated hypos may lead to a desensitisation of your adrenergic response to the point you won't detect future hypos coming on

Feet-check your feet so as they're not cracked/calluses also look for loss of feling in the feet, loss of hair and a loss of colour in the feet/change in colour. Pain on walking esp in the calves-may signal peripheral vascular disease

If you need to get up to go to the bathroom more than twice a night on a regular basis think about getting a renal function test done or if you are going to the toilet more fequently than usual. If you get postural hpotension etc etc

There's a whole myriad of stuff that can happen and I don't have the time to type up everything but add more as I go along

Plus it took me a while to type and I was logged out automatically?
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Old May 19, 2012, 04:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iDumb
Wrong, that was the answer I was expecting from mar umpire. I would have ripped him apart if he said that. Lucky for him you answered. Impressive from you being not in the field however
We've been ripped by enough consultants to not give a single diagnosis
I'm also impressed by Doc ZUnaid

iDUmb what are you looking for? Differentials? Investigations. Because DKA would be high on the list but you can't rule out anything else based on what you've given-where's the pain, does it radiate, what worsens or exacerbates it etc etc? Is she dehydrated? What are her vitals-if I don't even know the vitals I can't really prioritise which system's at risk and whether first and foremost if she's haemodynamically stable

The fact she's a female you can't rule out pregnancies esp ectopic ones and a beta HCG blood test would be use for that. SO being a female complicates the matters due to the fact her ovaries etc could be involve whether it's torsion or a ruptured cyst etc etc
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Old May 19, 2012, 04:40 AM
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Finally BC's own "freakshow" thread featuring unfortunate, miserable people under considerable pain and torment. The attempted medicalization of this crass, tasteless and perverse curiosity is far more shameful than the aforesaid curiosity itself.
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Old May 19, 2012, 04:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iDumb
Wrong, that was the answer I was expecting from mar umpire. I would have ripped him apart if he said that. Lucky for him you answered. Impressive from you being not in the field however
I have a personal interest. And I always read up on whatever is ailing me or or my family and will discuss the latest articles and treatments with the treating physician. I have full-text access to SciencDirect and there's always MedLine and MedLine plus.

Question:

Fischer Grade IV
Hunt Hess Grade 3 with ventriculomegaly
Terson's Syndrome
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  #23  
Old May 19, 2012, 04:50 AM
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Not really sure about "attempted medicalisation"-as these are medical problems
People in the past didn't know these were medical problems and attributed these to many other things and even blamed the sufferers-that was crass
To describe their condition as a "crass and perverse curiosity"?-they are ill and their illnesses being labelled "perverse" is quite shameful actually

Knowing about the conditions and learning about them being crass? That can be your opinion but I'd rather know and learn then sit back and feel sorry. Feeling sorry doesn't help anyone


I don't see eye to eye with you on most things and I certainly don't see eye to eye with you now. rare problems exist-learning about them suddenly doesn't become shameful.Knowledge is empowering (cliche but true).

No-one in the thread expressed anything other than sympathy for those affected but at the same time it's interesting to see how these conditions occur

When someone with a condition like this walks in you don't simply say "I'm ashamed to medicalise you etc etc"

Besides patients on the whole like speakng about their condition like educating people on their condition and don't for the most part seek out our sympathy
If people want to find out about something else they are free to ask. If they don't want this then I'll stop i have no issues.

But a forum where most people are educated adults I didn't think a topic regarding rare medical problems would be shameful-I have no commercial interests and I'm not gaining anything from it as some medical programs do. I simply put it out there as food for thought for the BC people.

We take a lot of things for granted and as a religious person these things are there for contemplation as much as education

directed at the second post above
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Old May 19, 2012, 05:09 AM
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I kind of agree with Sohel. If we are going to discuss dispassionately strange medical conditions, why only those that have a visual impact? There are are (at least to me) far more interesting syndromes and symptoms in the domain of neuroscience. The cases discussed by VS Ramachandran in his many books (e.g. Phantoms in the brain) are very thought provoking - if I were younger, I would have done triple major in linguistic anthropology, theoretical physics, and neuroscience (particularly focusing on memory - I recommend Nobel winner Eric Kandell's "In Search of Memory" and Daniel Schacter's "The Seven Sins of Memory". Eminently readable for even lay folks such as myself.
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Old May 19, 2012, 05:20 AM
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No 1-I had no intention of making this a "visually appealing/unappealing" medical cases thread-the reason I posted these were because in order to pique the public's interest the abstract is not something one goes to straight away-so I went for the more well known ones and ones popularised by the media-it is in fact these that people view as freak shows

No2-I apologise if I have presented this as an insensitive thing-the psychosocial aspect of the patients health is as important as anything and I think it is the failing on the part of the physician in many cases esp in BD where adverse outcomes present

No3-I responded as I did(on hindsight perhaps shouldn't have) as I perceived it as a personal attack on my character- the words attempted medicalisation and "perverse curiosity" particularly got to me

No4-Again if you wish you can delete it. I put it out there as a thought provoking thing, to put people out of their comfort zones

I am happy to change this thread into random medical problems-anyone and everyone can ask Qs discuss their experiences etc

I am a firm believer from my own experience that a patient knows as much as the doc regarding their illnesses. Hence what you asked iDumb-judging by the journals you have access to you'd probably know as much about it as anyone

I would in no way ever, use the unfortunate people who suffer such conditions as a "freak show" of sorts-I was hurt by that insinuation, but if that is how it's perceived I'm happy for the thread to change

I am also happy to apologise to SohelNR if my thread has offended him-it wasn't meant to be offensive
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