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  #1  
Old October 4, 2014, 10:25 PM
5tonne 5tonne is offline
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Default "Bangladesh stagnant because nothing’s changed"- Richard McInnes

How did you decide to get involved in Bangladesh cricket?

I was invited to be involved back in 2003 for the first time and spent almost two years with the Bangladesh Cricket Board, working across the Under-19 and ‘A’ team programs and developed their initial high performance program. At that time, we had a reasonable impact on a group of maybe 20 to 30 players, most of whom went on to play in the national side and many are still in the side. I enjoyed this experience, we had some good results and really made an impact on how these guys prepared and played the game. There was still much to do, so when the offer came up again in 2012, I was keen to build on what we had started in 2003.


What are the improvements you sought making while taking up the responsibility at the National Cricket Academy?

From 2003 to 2005, I was able to influence a group of players and coaches, but I was not in a position to influence much outside of that. In my second stint, I was keen to try and improve the infrastructure to provide a better platform for the development of international quality players. I was particularly keen to try and build the depth of the national team, as well as try to improve the support structures around first-class cricket in particular.


How did that work out?

In my second stint, I was particularly keen to try and build depth of the national team. But as far as first-class cricket is concerned, nothing changed, and as a result, the performances remain the same. We did not really achieve anywhere near what I wanted to. It was a really frustrating experience. I developed numerous proposals for the Board to try to make some changes and very few of them could even get to a board meeting for discussion.


What do you think is the reason behind Bangladesh failing to notch a single substantial win this year?

To be fair, I recall earlier this year, they had some extremely close results against Sri Lanka and again in the Asia Cup. From memory, the two Twenty20 games against Sri Lanka came down to the last ball, the first of which was marred by a terrible umpiring call, and should have resulted in a Bangladesh win. They then hosted the World Twenty20 playing against the best teams, so again these were always going to be tough games.

It was only six months earlier, they did beat West Indies and New Zealand in (an ODI) series at home. They were doing it tough in West Indies, but would they expect to beat West Indies at home? Probably not – unless the conditions are very spin-friendly, but many of those same issues were present, it was just that West Indies and New Zealand struggled with the conditions on and off the field.

So it is important to put this year’s win/loss ratio in context. Prior to each of those matches, if you assessed the teams and the conditions, how many of those games would you have expected Bangladesh to win realistically? Of course, we wanted them to win all of those games, but if we were allowed to bet on the outcome, how often would you have put your last 100 dollars on them winning those games?


Where do you think they have gone wrong essentially?

I watched most of these games and the way they lost some of them was probably more concerning than the fact they did not win. I think overall, in watching a number of these games, the most frustrating feature is watching how some of the players carry themselves and apply themselves to the basics, like fielding, backing up and running between wickets. It is okay to be beaten for skill and experience by better teams, but for a team like Bangladesh there is no reason or excuse to beaten on enthusiasm or attitude, or doing the small controllable elements of the game well. For me this is the most disappointing feature.


What are the main factors influencing Bangladesh’s performance on the international stage? Can you shed some light on the first-class scenario?

There are many factors. Some of these factors are controllable and some are not. Many aspects of first-class cricket are controllable, but unfortunately for some reason, there seems to be little understanding of what is required or willingness to truly make it a first-class competition.

For the 2012-13 season, for most first-class teams, there was no pre-season. Up to four days before the first match, some national squad players still did not know which team they were playing for. To me that symbolises the state of first-class cricket in Bangladesh.

It is easy to be critical of the pitches, but it is difficult to change the soil type and to find enough highly skilled groundsmen to prepare good wickets. While it is difficult to change the pitches, it should not be hard to have the first-class schedule in place three to six months in advance, to have squads formulated, to appoint coaching and support staff to prepare the players properly and then help to manage them and help them learn through the season. The schedule itself, the road travel required between games, almost ensure that the standard of play drops away very quickly once the season gets underway.


How did last year’s political situation affect cricket in the country?

The political situation, the constant hartals, had a detrimental effect on the programs we were trying to run. The Dhaka Premier League was on again, off again, on again, off again all throughout 2013 and we tried to establish an academy program around this but it was futile, as the goalposts kept moving and we could never get players for more than a couple of weeks.


How important are the domestic leagues?

The domestic leagues are very valuable to cricket in Bangladesh as the provide most of the income for a majority of the players, so they do need to be conducted. It is also the most competitive cricket they play domestically with a long history and some great rivalries. This has been diluted a little over the last few years however, with players moving around between clubs, which reduces loyalty and willingness to work really hard for a result.


Why did the Board want to have two leagues this year?

The concept of running two leagues this year is driven by the fact that there was not one last year, and therefore the players missed out on that income. This is a shame and hurts the players. The reason it was not conducted though, is that the owners of the teams refuse to play when the national players are not available. Therefore, they could not find time last season to play it, as the national team schedule was quite full.

Can you imagine Cricket Australia not running the Big Bash League or the Sheffield Shield because the national players were busy, or the BCCI suspending the Ranji Trophy for the same reason? No other board operates this way and it sums up domestic cricket in Bangladesh.


Why hasn’t Bangladesh cricket seen stark improvement over the last few years?

Nothing has changed in terms of how the game is run domestically, so the outcomes have not changed. There have been small pockets of improvement through the dedicated, quality work of a small few within the Board and within management, but overall these small changes are swamped by the more significant issues that have not been dealt with.


Your thoughts on the Board and administration

There are some wonderful people working for the BCB, but few very good Board members who know what is needed for the outcomes to be different. Unfortunately, when there are about 27 Board members, those good few are swamped by a much larger number of people who are involved just to be associated with the cricket board, or for other reasons, or stop many of the required decisions being made.

They watch cricket, they understand the rules, they probably even love the game, but with all due respect, they do not know what is required behind the scenes to build a solid cricket infrastructure. This is understandable, many of them have never been involved with a sporting team competing in elite international sport, let alone with a team that has been successful, or with the infrastructure that allows that success to occur.


What would you attribute the stagnation of the sport in the country to?

Ultimately, the reason Bangladesh cricket’s progress has stagnated is that nothing has changed. They keep shuffling the players around, shuffling the coaching and support staff, but nothing else behind the scenes changes. The game development department is doing its best and continues to provide opportunities to good young players, but once they reach the senior level, it all falls apart. If the senior cricket structures do not change significantly, and soon, then the outcomes will not change.

It is a long list, but underpinning it all, is the lack of a vision and a strategic and operation plan for the entire organisation. Decisions are therefore made on a whim or depending on the mood of the decision-makers. Decisions are made reactively, rather than proactively. There are no clear priorities to be focussed on and therefore no progress in any particular area. In my experience, this underpins many of the other ailments that beset cricket in Bangladesh.


When do you see that changing?

I am a strong supporter of cricket in Bangladesh and I understand first-hand how passionate the entire population is about the game, how great the players are to work with, but unless there are some significant changes in how the game is managed, nothing will change. How can it? Isn’t that the definition of insanity – keep doing the same things and hope the outcomes change?

Source: http://www.wisdenindia.com/interview...changed/128077

Same old, same old. We hard all of these before from Pybus, Siddons, Whatmore and every other person ever worked for BCB. And we all know its only gonna go downwards from here like our football.
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  #2  
Old October 5, 2014, 12:44 AM
Gowza Gowza is offline
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good interview but it's quit a saddening one, of course positives can come out of it but given history you just expect things to continue on as they have been.
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  #3  
Old October 5, 2014, 03:30 AM
MHRAM MHRAM is offline
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I agree with Mcinnes.

but its not only players but also a cultural habit that we don't vote for change.

There is a reason why crooks like Hasina Zia r still ruling.

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  #4  
Old October 6, 2014, 02:49 AM
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Ian Pont Ian Pont is offline
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I said this so many times and agree 100% with Richard. Julien Fountain and I used to have many long discussions together over dinner and said that if the BCB. the players and everyone associated with cricket ever got things right, then there is no reason why Bangladesh couldn't be successful.

But as Richard has highlighted, it is completely messed up from top to bottom. There is no real collective will to be excellent sadly, only a need to look after self-interest.

The last 12 or more years of Test Cricket has not been used wisely in my view due to this. Players like Sakib, Taskin, Anamul and others come through IN SPITE of the system and not because of the system. It means Bangladesh can only ever get short term gains that are not really sustainable.

My heart aches for the fans.
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  #5  
Old October 6, 2014, 04:45 AM
BanCricFan BanCricFan is offline
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I have a dream. Oneday Bangladesh will be the top Test nation in the whole universe/multiverses.



















And the key to that multiversal success would be our very own the age old mantra of "doing absolutely nothing...same 'ole, same 'ole" mantra. This patented simple but super-powerful, cost-effective, green, very fairtrade and optimum model then will be exported to all the multiversal nations, tribes, clans, unions and the super-evolved benevolent inter-verse warlords. Thus, Bangladesh becoming the most successful and powerful nation on the face of planet earth as we know it today! Infact, we will be sole occupant of this "blue" planet. Others have already...

Eid Mubaarak!
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  #6  
Old October 6, 2014, 10:07 PM
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Tiger444 Tiger444 is offline
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An excellent interview by coach McInnes. Hate to say it, but we really deserve to be a 9/10 team or even lower. Let's say the likes of Ireland, Scotland, Netherlands, Afghanistan got as many chances, would they have been as bad? Fact is, we'll never get to the level of the G8 unless there's a massive overhaul from top to bottom. Sadly we either might never see it or it'll take a while.
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  #7  
Old October 6, 2014, 10:34 PM
jeesh jeesh is offline
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The guy at the top must be moved, and replaced with someone who treats the cricket like a serious business and not a chamber of commerce or extra curricular activity. Someone who has vision and is ambitious. Our current president is only interested in day to day affairs, or the past.

Secondly such an individual must be moved from operation and the running of BCB. Our current CEO who had an acting title for the longest time is just a Yes Sir man. Get a real CEO from sporting background give him freedom. Till date, Macky Dudhia has been Bangladesh's best executive, but such individuals can never work with so much of interference.

Thirdly the size of the board has to be chopped, and only those with genuine knowledge of the game must be kept. Easier said that done. But if a decision has to go through 27 people before approval, then everything that the coaches will come up will get stuck. Its not like running a country, its simply running the cricket of a number 9 country. Why do we need so many people?

Until and unless the above three issues are sorted nothing else will be solved.
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  #8  
Old October 7, 2014, 02:58 AM
5tonne 5tonne is offline
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I hear lot of praise for Macky Dudhia but don't know what good things he has done or tried to do. Can someone please enlighten me.
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  #9  
Old October 7, 2014, 02:59 AM
dark mage dark mage is offline
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Yesterday I was watching an interview with the current head of the Bangladesh Football Federation. His name is Salauddin who is an ex-national player. You could tell that man has vision, is practical and yet trying his best to pull up Bnagladesh Soccer. As a result, Bangladesh Soccer seems to be going through a resurgence.

We need someone like that for cricket and the only person I remember was Saber Hussain Chowdhury but this crook Papon didn't let him win in the election by rigging up the whole election process.
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Old October 7, 2014, 08:23 AM
jeesh jeesh is offline
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Salahuddin has a lot more vision than our past 2-3 cricket chiefs put together. Only difference is BFF doesnt have the money, and is many ways more corrupt than cricket. Most of the time the foreign coaches we have dont even get paid.
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  #11  
Old October 7, 2014, 08:34 AM
jeesh jeesh is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 5tonne
I hear lot of praise for Macky Dudhia but don't know what good things he has done or tried to do. Can someone please enlighten me.
ICC actually recommended we sign him, and even paid for his first year-one of the prerequisites of test status-having a professional sports administrator. On paper he was the first person who set up a professional corporate environment with processes/policies etc.

I got to know from someone who was working at BCB that Dudhia was soft spoken but a very tough administrator. There were lots strict rules which governed everything that happened. A disorganized entity all of a sudden tried to become process dirven.

But our system is such that our president will always interfere with the actions of the chief executive. And such tough disciplinarian approach often doesnt go well with government job mindset people.

A small example, if a camera man focuses a bit extra on a an area of the pitch with a certain advertising hoarding, he will be entitled to a commission. But there are rules which prevent such things, its plain and simple corruption. Happens even today. The days he was in office, he tried to put a total ban on these type of things. Never works well with the advertisers or the BCB staff who make a tonne of money this way.
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  #12  
Old October 7, 2014, 11:44 AM
BanCricFan BanCricFan is offline
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[QUOTE=dark mage;1799868]Yesterday I was watching an interview with the current head of the Bangladesh Football Federation. His name is Salauddin who is an ex-national player. You could tell that man has vision, is practical and yet trying his best to pull up Bnagladesh Soccer. As a result, Bangladesh Soccer seems to be going through a resurgence.

QUOTE]

Kazi Salahuddin is one of a kind -very rare in our country. He was also our very first professional sportsman (footballer). He played as a pro in Hong Kong in the early 80s. I didn't watch him much but most people who watched him play say he was brilliantly skillful on the pitch and off it a consumate pro. Way ahead of his time -by our standard. He not only revolutionized coaching/management in our country but was also highly respected in club management all over South Asia. Was the first to call himself a 'manager' as opposed to a 'coach' in South Asian football. We also had a few other very good footballer who came after him -Samad, Waasim (Brothers Union), Chunnu, Kaisar Hamid, Sabbir and Munna all very gifted, talented and successful. We were a serious force in S. Asian football then. Yes, us "puny" Bangladeshis are talented and can be successful, too. They all are a testimony to that fact. Football, by the way, is much more physical sports than cricket. Just for those who sometime are unduly obsessed with size, gene and what not . I digress - I know.

You're right we need a chap like Salahuddin in BCB. Saber Chowdhury the best option we got.

Last edited by BanCricFan; October 7, 2014 at 12:19 PM..
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  #13  
Old October 8, 2014, 03:21 AM
5tonne 5tonne is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeesh
ICC actually recommended we sign him, and even paid for his first year-one of the prerequisites of test status-having a professional sports administrator. On paper he was the first person who set up a professional corporate environment with processes/policies etc.

I got to know from someone who was working at BCB that Dudhia was soft spoken but a very tough administrator. There were lots strict rules which governed everything that happened. A disorganized entity all of a sudden tried to become process dirven.

But our system is such that our president will always interfere with the actions of the chief executive. And such tough disciplinarian approach often doesnt go well with government job mindset people.

A small example, if a camera man focuses a bit extra on a an area of the pitch with a certain advertising hoarding, he will be entitled to a commission. But there are rules which prevent such things, its plain and simple corruption. Happens even today. The days he was in office, he tried to put a total ban on these type of things. Never works well with the advertisers or the BCB staff who make a tonne of money this way.
Thanks Jeesh. Some ugly secrets there too. Wasn't aware of such scams.
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  #14  
Old October 8, 2014, 07:30 AM
M.H.Rubel M.H.Rubel is offline
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This is a very good interview by R.McInnes. Some sentences are painful for all the administrators of BCB. I like the interview.
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  #15  
Old October 8, 2014, 11:51 AM
SS SS is offline
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R.McInnes ki amader deshe ar firre asbena konodin..
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  #16  
Old October 8, 2014, 11:53 AM
Shubho Shubho is offline
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While I agree wholeheartedly with R. McInnes, I also believe he is just stating what has been bloody obvious to all of us BD cricket fans for years. That the administrators are corrupt and/or inept and/or unmotivated has always been clear.

My problem is that the players themselves are not being held to account more strictly. Ian indicated that players like Shakib, Mushy, Anamul, etc, emerge in spite of the system, not because of it. I am inclined to agree, but I also believe that there should be a crap-tonne of more players emerging in spite of our inept cricket administration.

Out of a population of 160 million people, and in a sport as lucrative (by Bangladeshi standards) as cricket, with the amount of cricketing infrastructure we already have in place, we should be able to produce 100-200 cricketers who are self-motivated and self-disciplined enough to compete with the best.

But we don't.

Because our lot are too stupid to know what food to eat, how and how much to exercise, what cricket skills to work on, whom to seek out for advice, how to handle pressure, etc. Everything bloody well needs to be spoon-fed to them. I wouldn't be surprised if they needed a five-day course on how to wipe their buttholes.

So, yes, our cricket administration is a pile of turd. But I would argue that the players are equally to blame.
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Old October 8, 2014, 01:58 PM
mafizraju mafizraju is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shubho
My problem is that the players themselves are not being held to account more strictly. Ian indicated that players like Shakib, Mushy, Anamul, etc, emerge in spite of the system, not because of it. I am inclined to agree, but I also believe that there should be a crap-tonne of more players emerging in spite of our inept cricket administration.

Out of a population of 160 million people, and in a sport as lucrative (by Bangladeshi standards) as cricket, with the amount of cricketing infrastructure we already have in place, we should be able to produce 100-200 cricketers who are self-motivated and self-disciplined enough to compete with the best.

But we don't.

Because our lot are too stupid to know what food to eat, how and how much to exercise, what cricket skills to work on, whom to seek out for advice, how to handle pressure, etc. Everything bloody well needs to be spoon-fed to them. I wouldn't be surprised if they needed a five-day course on how to wipe their buttholes.

So, yes, our cricket administration is a pile of turd. But I would argue that the players are equally to blame.

I find comments like these to be ignorent, disrespectful, and to some extent down right stupid. Please allow me to explain.

Let me give an example. I want to be a world class Physicist. Nobody in the right mind would expect me to become a world class physicist without the right sort of guidence, infrastructure, and help from experts. In fact, one needs to toil years. And that is why Bangladesh has not produced a single home grown physicist over the years. By homegrown, I mean completely trained only in Bangladesh. It is an absolute lunatic of an argument to make that the primary reason we do not home grow world class physicist, is because our young minds somehow do not work hard or too stupid to know better. And I think most will agree.

But we go ahead and use the same sort of arguments for players. Somehow we think that becoming a very good player is easier than becoming a Physicist. One somehow needs to follow some instant mix formula and, Eureka, becomes a player the world will remember.

A good player spend significant portion of his/her young life playing and concentrating only on the game. They have to make a lot of sacrifices to become as good of a player as one can by the time he is 25, which is quite unlike being a physicist who has his/her entire life to prove.

Hence the achievment of Shakib, Tamim, and Mushfiq are so amazing. They come out despite the lack of the infrastructure. But even this argument is not full proof. All three have experience the best training Bangladesh could offer at that time. I honestly believe that the fact that Tamim has stalled at a pre-2010 stage (after peaking at 2010-11 season) is solely due to lack of guidance and infrastructure, and nothing else.

Instead of demanding that BCB change it's course, when we get involved with these sort of arguments that somehow the players are not motivated to get better, we unwittingly do more harm to our cause.
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Old October 8, 2014, 02:29 PM
Shubho Shubho is offline
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Re the above post, my argument may be disrespectful, but certainly not stupid. Allow me to explain:

There are other countries who produce and have produced better cricketers than we have despite equally inept cricket administration. I think all the Pakistani, Sri Lankan, West Indian and Zimbabwean greats we have seen over the years have emerged in spite of their respective cricket boards.

I refuse to believe that we do not have as many talented cricketers as they have, especially given our population of 160 million, which (mind you) dwarfs the populations of Sri Lanka, West Indies and Zimbabwe put together.

As I said in my original post, I think the players are just as inept as the administrators. They are equally culpable in my book. Barring a few exceptions, I believe that BD cricketers lack sufficient dedication to the game.
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Old October 8, 2014, 06:53 PM
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Rinathq Rinathq is offline
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I completely agree with Shubho. As corrupt or inept our board maybe, I still find them better than some other boards out there. With the setup in place, we should still be a better team than Zimbabwe by a huge margin and neck on neck with West Indies and to an extent New Zealand. But look where we are right now. You would have to be optimistic to call our team favorites at home right now against Zimbabwe.

When you see the situation where you know the talent is there but the execution of talent is uncertain or highly inconsistent..... you know its the players! Either their work ethic is poor, or their willingness to learn or modify their approach with time isnt there or they are simply not learning. Sadly all those scenarios are present in almost every player in our setup. What would BCB do? plan an extended domestic season? Did that.... but the players dont even apply themselves there. Send players on foreign tours? Doing that... they make it a vacation for them and embarrassment for us
Get better coaches? Well tried that for sure but players needs to be guided and commanded to perform their basic routines. Forget about reaching out to the coaches.

Cricket is actually a very lucrative profession in the country. Its the players who needs to step up and apply themselves. They need to understand its their profession and it needs to taken professionally and not as a recreation.
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Old October 8, 2014, 07:20 PM
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22Yards 22Yards is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mafizraju
I find comments like these to be ignorent, disrespectful, and to some extent down right stupid. Please allow me to explain.

Let me give an example. I want to be a world class Physicist. Nobody in the right mind would expect me to become a world class physicist without the right sort of guidence, infrastructure, and help from experts. In fact, one needs to toil years. And that is why Bangladesh has not produced a single home grown physicist over the years. By homegrown, I mean completely trained only in Bangladesh. It is an absolute lunatic of an argument to make that the primary reason we do not home grow world class physicist, is because our young minds somehow do not work hard or too stupid to know better. And I think most will agree.

But we go ahead and use the same sort of arguments for players. Somehow we think that becoming a very good player is easier than becoming a Physicist. One somehow needs to follow some instant mix formula and, Eureka, becomes a player the world will remember.

A good player spend significant portion of his/her young life playing and concentrating only on the game. They have to make a lot of sacrifices to become as good of a player as one can by the time he is 25, which is quite unlike being a physicist who has his/her entire life to prove.

Hence the achievment of Shakib, Tamim, and Mushfiq are so amazing. They come out despite the lack of the infrastructure. But even this argument is not full proof. All three have experience the best training Bangladesh could offer at that time. I honestly believe that the fact that Tamim has stalled at a pre-2010 stage (after peaking at 2010-11 season) is solely due to lack of guidance and infrastructure, and nothing else.

Instead of demanding that BCB change it's course, when we get involved with these sort of arguments that somehow the players are not motivated to get better, we unwittingly do more harm to our cause.
I see where you both guys are coming from but I have incline a little towards Subho. Allow me to explain.

Going by your example, let's say you want to become a world class Physicist but Bangladesh does not have the infrastructure, training centers, educators who can help you become one. But how do you justify yourself if you don't remember the three laws of sir Issac Newton which were taught to you by your "secondary master" when you were in grade 7 ? How do you justify yourself if you do your homework but don't apply what you have learnt in your exams or if you simply don't know how to follow instructions that the teacher drilled into your brain a thousand times ? The problem is in you buddy. The system may not be good enough for you to become the best but it has enough in place to be successful/competitive if one is dedicated enough, provided you do the basics right. Example: Shakib Al Hasan

Watching Bangladesh play these days and failing is not a matter of that they are inferior in skill to other teams but their understanding of the basics (Captain Fantastic Mushfiq) and attitude towards the game (Abdur Raj Razzak, Shohag Gazi, Nasir, Imrul etc)
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Old October 8, 2014, 10:12 PM
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Mufi bhai had a similar thread on this topic. I want to hear Ian and Richard's input on the players too since they know what goes on behind the scenes much more than us and how much blame should go on them.

From my view, top to bottom we are the either the worst or 2nd worst and that's reflected on the field. So that means a lot of blame goes on the board and also on the players. I disagree that SL, Pak and WI have equally inept boards. There might be some payment issues they have had which we hear about but they know how to develop their players in to world class players. All the players they produced didn't happen by accident. They might not be churning our world class players as quickly as England and Australia but they still produce very good players whereas we rarely produce any. Their domestic leagues are far better and more professional than ours.

That said our players also should be taking a lot blame as well. I remember Ian a long time back talked about how the pacers didn't come up to him for advice. Out of all the players in the WC squad, he said only SN, Rock and Mushy went the extra yard in practice. That's not a good sign if only 3 players out of 15 is impressing the coach with their work ethic. Here in the US, if even one of the players is not going the extra yard, they get kicked out. So that is a huge problem with us.

I think at the end of the day a lot has to fall on our lack of professionalism. The players and the board is just not doing enough to become a Test level side. The potential has always been there but it just hasn't been exercised at all.
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  #22  
Old October 8, 2014, 10:41 PM
jeesh jeesh is offline
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What Shubho said might sound harsh and hard to digest, but its the brutal truth.

Yes the infrastructure, the academies, the domestic competitions, the grounds everything is badly in need of fix. But our national team has good top coaches and support staff. At least with their mentoring, our guys should achieve a lot more than what they display. How do Afghanistan, Ireland do well-i dont think either of those two countries invest anything close to what we do on our cricket.

Simple example: Rubel Hossain, veteran of 49 ODI's, 20 Tests, yet you will get Under 19 players from other nations with more maturity. Why was he picked? Probably because of his pace, and skill, but in the head-sorry to say fairly empty, and lacks the attitude and values required to be a successful sportsman. Compare his story with Lasith Malinga who was literally picked off the beach. Malinga has come so far today because he has worked hard on developing his game. He has worked with numerous coaches-Ramanayake, Vaas. But he hasnt depended on any one of them to be spoon fed. He developed his own style, yorkers, slower deliveries. He got help on the way, but his adeptness in these was through the countless hours he has put on the nets.

Now why cant Rubel follow Malinga? Not sure Rubel is prepared to think like Malinga, or work hard. Tomorrow even if BCB appoint Troy Cooley or Craig McDermott, maybe we ll see temporary improvement in Rubel, but a month later it ll be back to normal erratic Rubel Hossain. Sadly players who do display willingness to learn like Nazmul Hossain never make it to the squad.
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  #23  
Old October 9, 2014, 12:44 AM
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al Furqaan al Furqaan is offline
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We won't reach our full potential unless we fix most of our ills. And that ain't likely. We will languish and every now and then some world class players will be produced despite the corrupt and inept system that they came from. Mushfiq, Shakib, Mashrafe, Tamim prime examples. Mash was cut short by injuries, Tamim is underachieving yet they are still 'good enough' at the highest level. Mushfiq and Shakib are continuously improving.

Its still to early to tell, but I have full faith Mominul, Anamul, and Taskin will join those 4. Maybe Mosaddek and Shadman too one day.

Overall I'm cautiously optimistic that we can reach 7th in the world rankings with the current core. To get beyond that we need to fix the mess in the BCB. Our population means we have no reason to not be able to achieve a top 4 rank one day.
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  #24  
Old October 9, 2014, 03:52 AM
Gowza Gowza is offline
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my hope is that mominul, anamul and taskin come through well and in combination with shakib, mushy, tamim and to a lesser extent mash they'll start to change the thought process of players in BD. i don't have much hope in the BCB making changes unless it gets a complete overhaul.
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  #25  
Old October 9, 2014, 11:49 AM
mafizraju mafizraju is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shubho
Re the above post, my argument may be disrespectful, but certainly not stupid. Allow me to explain:

There are other countries who produce and have produced better cricketers than we have despite equally inept cricket administration. I think all the Pakistani, Sri Lankan, West Indian and Zimbabwean greats we have seen over the years have emerged in spite of their respective cricket boards.

I refuse to believe that we do not have as many talented cricketers as they have, especially given our population of 160 million, which (mind you) dwarfs the populations of Sri Lanka, West Indies and Zimbabwe put together.

As I said in my original post, I think the players are just as inept as the administrators. They are equally culpable in my book. Barring a few exceptions, I believe that BD cricketers lack sufficient dedication to the game.
West Indies and Pakistan are bad comparison. Both have deep cricketing history. However the result of their board's ineptitude translates into the current crisis. And neither are in very good shape.

We tend to ignore the informal structure that exist in the country. The fact that both pakistan and westindies still producing players, are solely due to their informal structure. Their domestic cricket competition is still much better than ours.

Zimbabwe produced great players when their structure were in better shape. If you notice that Zimbabwean team largely is composed of same group of players they had ten years ago. That is good in terms of performance on the field. But it also tells us how short they are in new talents who would do better than the one he is replacing ( this is not too different than ours). Zimbabwe has not produced a single really world class player (who can get in to most teams of the world) since Flower brothers.

Now Srilankan case is interesting. Srilankan cricket structure still much superior than ours. In 1996 they were a surprise. That was they took the world by surprise with strategy and depth in the talents. That team was hugely dependent on Sanath Jayasuria, Arvind De Silva, and Ranatunga. We have not produced a single player of that quality. With the retirement of the senior players, Srilanka struggled for a bit (they got knocked out from first stage in 1999). They started to play better as the newer groups of players started to perform.

It seems to me that my conclusion stands. That we simply do not have infrastructure to consistently produce world class players. Blaming players' commitment is simply futile and completely misplaced.
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